Graeme Wood Profile picture
13 Jan, 4 tweets, 1 min read
You had me at "Production of enough [Moderna] doses to vaccinate the entire world within a year would cost less than $4 billion" nytimes.com/2021/01/12/opi…
It is unsettling that there is any doubt that such an investment would be worthwhile
When I hear “$4-billion for Moderna vaccines for the whole world within a year” I think “Uhh… how much for the whole world in a month?"
If I were a country in need of good PR, I would put out a statement by noon today promising to fund mRNA vaccine for everyone on earth.

$4-billion is 0.8% of the GDP of Venezuela
0.5% of Saudi Arabia
0.9% of Iran
0.02% of USA

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More from @gcaw

23 Dec 20
Trump really likes war criminals. Lots of people have been convicted of crimes, and very few are war criminals. But war criminals—bad ones, even by the standards of the category—keep getting pardons.
Maybe you’ve lost the ability to be shocked at the terrible crimes Trump pardoned. Recover that shock by remembering the crimes he *didn’t* pardon, many of them not terrible at all! Minor oversights, victimless crimes, slip-ups. He chose these ones instead
For an example of the kind of crimes that a president *could* pardon, read @jon_rauch’s @TheAtlantic piece from 2007: theatlantic.com/magazine/archi… How far down the list of potential pardon recipients would you have to go, before you pardoned someone who shot a young mom in the street?
Read 4 tweets
14 Dec 20
Rarely have I enjoyed browsing a spreadsheet more than I enjoyed this list of celebrities whom the Trump administrated vetted for participation in a public vaccination campaign: oversight.house.gov/sites/democrat…
The only fully vetted celebrity who said yes was Dennis Quaid. A great actor, but I wonder how many people think “any injectable substance good enough for Dennis Quaid is good enough for my children” oversight.house.gov/sites/democrat…
Scott Baio is thought to appeal to the “elderly” demographic. Ouch
Read 9 tweets
27 Nov 20
According to this article, Kylie Moore-Gilbert was arrested and held hostage by Iran—then swapped for three bumbling Iranian assassins imprisoned in Thailand—because she had an Israeli boyfriend. smh.com.au/politics/feder…
A reminder: Iran’s a fascinating country, fun to visit, but you don’t get to choose what aspect of your extended biography will or will not be used as an excuse to hold you in solitary confinement for years at a time and trade you for the freedom of murderers
Gilbert-Moore’s ordeal was longer than usual. Other cases aren’t reported—and there is the separate category of Iranians of dual nationality imprisoned unjustly for ties overseas. E.g., @FaribaRoland. If you knew how often this happened, your desire to visit Iran would diminish
Read 7 tweets
2 Sep 20
I read “In Defense of Looting” (after legally acquiring a copy). My review in @TheAtlantic: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
To my partial surprise, the book is only tangentially about looting. Mostly it’s a defense of violence, arguing that nonviolence, in the form associated with (for example) Martin Luther King, is a tool of white supremacist cisheteropatriarchy
The book’s argument: the US was conceived in racist, patriarchal sin. The concept of “property” is illegitimate and produces and perpetuates those evils. Loot and take up arms to fix the problem. That’s what works—not nonviolence—and by the way it is beautiful
Read 6 tweets
5 May 20
A French-Algerian fishmonger, 42, showed up with #COVID19 at an ER in Paris on December 27—about two weeks after the first cases presented in hospitals in Wuhan. The fishmonger had not traveled overseas since a trip to Algeria in August.

sciencedirect.com/science/articl…!
This French case arrived *12 days* before the case in Thailand previously thought to be the first outside China. who.int/news-room/deta…
The fishmonger probably contracted #COVID19 around Dec 20. I would very much like to know where his strain sits on the virus's family tree….
Read 4 tweets
24 Apr 20
In March, 43.5% of workers on a South Korean call center floor were infected with #COVID19. Look how the cases cluster in a packed indoor space, and spare others not in the same space.

This is the Broad Street pump map for the 21st century
wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/26… (via @zeynep)
This is the 11th floor. Notice that everyone uses the same elevator bank, but infections cluster anyway.

96% of infections in the building were on this floor.

This suggests certain inferences about the danger of transmission on shared surfaces and in elevators.
The main accelerant appears to be sitting in a closed space, huffing other people’s air for an extended period.

Now I’m wondering about South Korean elevator etiquette. What were these colleagues in a call center bullpen doing that they wouldn’t also do in an elevator?
Read 6 tweets

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