, 13 tweets, 4 min read Read on Twitter
Learn the difference between these words, for those concerned:

I'm
Am

Lose
Loose

@DrJoeAbah @segalink @akinalabi @iam_Davido @akaebube @AMADICHIMA

#thread
'I'm' is the same as 'I am', just as 'he's' for 'he is' or 'he has' (depending on the context); 'we've' for 'we have'. So, in the expression: 'I am', 'I' is the subject, the doer of the action and 'am' is the verb. Saying 'am hungry' is meaningless....
This is because you have not told us the person that is hungry. If you do not say: 'have eaten' for 'We've eaten/I've eaten' nor say 'is beautiful' for 'She's beautiful', then you shouldn't say 'am traveling' for 'I'm traveling'. The subject 'I' and the verb 'am' must go together
If using the short form 'I'm' is the problem, you can use the full version, 'I am' always. But you will sound too formal. Still, it's better so than to write 'am +1 today' or 'am a happy person.'
Now to the next pair.
The word 'lose' is used to show that one is no longer in possession of something. You can lose hope, lose money, lose sleep and so on. 'Lose' is a verb and can be used in the past tense.
For instance, 'I lost my sleep last night because of heat. I don't want to lose same tonight.' On the other hand, 'loose' is an adjective, it is used to describe the nature of things or people. Something that is loose is not fitting or firmly fixed in place.
You can use the double 'o' to identify something that is L-O-O-S-E. For example: 'The jeans is not my size; it is loose.' Teenagers can easily get loose these days' (having wrong sexual orientation).
In all honesty, it's embarrassing to hear a graduate say 'Am a Chelsea fan' (Apologies to Chelsea fans) or to write 'Don't loose guard because of a woman'. Yes, English is not our mother tongue but it is still our official language.
Don't be among those who have accepted the self-defeatist conclusion: 'No be grammar we go chop.' or 'Who English help?' Tomorrow is such a short time but quite unpredictable. Don't limit your tomorrow by limiting your language skills.
From today, please be cautious of your usage, if you're guilty. Practice and insist on the correct forms and you'll master them. Slow and steady, the snail reached the ark.

Omo, I don tire to dey type. Typing on the phone is such a herculean task! My first thread though.
Many people, from the comments, have pointed out other commonly confused words. We'll discuss them next time. Of course, English is a difficult language partly because of those words that sound alike.
'There' is used to indicate a place or location. For example: Keep the book there (maybe on top of a table, on a shelf, etc). John works there. We lived there many years ago. All these show location.

'Their' in contrast shows possession, what someone owns. E.g It is their book.
That is their problem. 'Their' is similar to 'our' (our brother); 'her' (her school); 'its' ( its tail).
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