, 89 tweets, 12 min read Read on Twitter
1/ A Christian Reaction to Misesian Intersexual Relationship Theory (“MIRT”), Otherwise Known as the “Red Pill”
2/ The historic position of men has been upended by the achievements of feminism: the right to vote, abortion and contraceptives, no-fault divorce, and the economic independence of women. These developments—primarily the decoupling of sex and marriage—have undermined...
3/ ...traditional monogamous relationships. As compared to the past, the age of marriage is rising ever higher, the proportion of people getting married continues to fall (records are being broken in Japan and the UK), and fewer and fewer children are being born.
4/ Against this backdrop of revolutionary change in intersexual relations, the “Red Pill” (“RP”) was born. Like the “blue pill/red pill” scene from “The Matrix” (1999), RP advocates from internet forum discussions in the late 1990s insist: (1) the current narrative...
5/ ...of ideal heterosexual relations is detrimental to men; (2) that RP offers the true but painful reality; and that (3) deliverance is found though practicing ethical egoism as contained in series of axioms (roughly 9 to 25).
6/ An influential figure within the RP movement, Rollo Tomassi, defines it as “amoral praxeology.... the Chilton manual of intersexual dynamics.” Widely considered the “godfather” of RP, this analysis will assume that definition from a critical perspective.
7/ “Praxeology” is the study of human action, based on the notion that humans engage in purposeful behavior. Put differently, it’s the logic of action and the implications of preference, choice and means-end. The modern term was defined by French social philosopher...
8/ ...Alfred Espinas, but made famous by the Austrian school created by Ludwig von Mises.
9/ Since praxeology is logic—just applied to human choice—it is not empirical. Like math, praxeology posits: this is/must be so by definition. And, because observations cannot falsify logically derived theory, it is not scientific.
10/ Historically, praxeology is an outgrowth of utilitarian liberalism. Ludwig von Mises, perhaps the most famous praxeologist, wrote: “There is, however, no such thing as a perennial standard of what is just and what is unjust. Nature is alien to the idea of right...
11/ ...and wrong.… The notion of right and wrong is a human device.” Human Action, Ch. 27, Sec. 3.
12/ Mises further elaborates in Human Action: “All moral rules and human laws are means for the realization of definite ends. There is no method available for the appreciation of their goodness or badness other than to scrutinize their usefulness for the attainment...
13/ ...of the ends chosen and aimed at…. The notion of right and wrong is … a utilitarian precept.… Social utility is the only standard of justice.”
14/ For those reasons, RP theory is to sex as the Austrian School (from which it is derived) is to economics: it promotes a utilitarian method by which society (here, men) can arrive at optimal outcomes irrespective of empiricism or ethical and moral evaluations.
15/ Because of its logical connection to Ludwig von Mises and radical libertarianism, RP will now be referred to a more accurate label: “Misesian Intersexual Relationship Theory,” or “MIRT”.
16/ MIRT’s central axioms are contained in the following"Iron Rules of Tomassi": (1) frame is everything.... always control [it] but resist giving the impression that you are; (2) never ... reveal the number of women you’ve slept with or ... detail your sexual...
17/ ...experiences with ... a current lover; (3) sex is never worth the wait [for] any woman who makes you wait for [it]; (4) never ... live with a woman you aren’t married to or are not planning to marry in within 6 months; (5) never allow a woman to be in control...
18/ ...of [conception]; (6) women are utterly incapable of loving a man in the way that a man expects to be loved; (7) always seek a new relationship over attempting to reconstruct a failed relationship; (8) always let a woman figure out why she wont [have sex] with...
19/ ...you; and (9) never self-deprecate under any circumstance.
20/ James C. Weidmann (blogging on “Chateau Heartise”) provides an additional 16 axioms of MIRT as follows: (10) never say ‘I Love You’ first; (11) make her jealous; (12) make your mission, not your woman, your priority; (13) don’t play by her rules; (14) adhere to...
21/ ...the golden ratio [by giving] your woman of everything she gives you; (15) keep her guessing; (16) always keep two [women so that] there is another you can turn to for affection [and to] fortify your will and satisfy your manhood; (17) say you’re sorry only...
22/ ...when absolutely necessary; (18) connect with her emotions; (19) ignore her beauty; (20) be irrationally self-confident; (21) maximize your strengths, minimize your weaknesses; (22) err on the side of too much boldness, rather than too little; (23) [Make love...
23/ ...to] her good; (24) maintain your state control; and (25) never be afraid to lose her.
24/ Not all of those axioms are objectionable. Some promote beneficial self-improvement. Others are tactical, but the most problematic encourage a “virtue of selfishness” according to an Ayn Rand worldview, such as the following numbered axioms: 3 (ignores moral...
25/ ...agency in decision to have sex), 6 (mere justification to act selfishly and treat women as ends), 7 (ignores moral and ethical considerations for the “ought” of preserving marriage and raising children), 11 (ignores moral and ethical considerations), 12...
26/ ...(implicates “virtue of selfishness” egoism) 14 (ignores moral and ethical considerations), 16 (ends justify the means/ignores moral and ethical considerations), 25 (implicates “virtue of selfishness” egoism).
27/ In “The Virtue of Selfishness” (1964), Ayn Rand explained rational egoism as a Man holding his own life as his highest value, rationality as his highest virtue, and his happiness as the final purpose of his life. MIRT follows this ethic of egoism and is best...
28/ ...summarized by Mr. Tomassi: “There is no Alpha with a side of Beta, there is only the man who’s genuine concern is first for himself, the man who prepares and provisions for himself, the man who maintains Frame to the point of arrogance because that’s who he is...
29/ ...and what he genuinely merits. There is only the Man who improves his circumstance for his own benefit, and then, by association and merit, the benefit of those whom he loves and befriends.”
30/ Two moral dilemmas emerge from embracing MIRT: first as it applies to the collective and then as it applies to the individual.
31/ First, MIRT views the world as a mere collection of individuals. To paraphrase Margaret Thatcher, “there is no society.” Within that view, what matters is a set of rules. There is no appreciation for whether such actions are good or appropriate in the aggregate or...
32/ ...across the span of time. In extreme cases, MIRT is self-defeating because it is rational for an individual to maximize personal gain even though that makes things worse for the community. This is illustrated by the “tragedy of the commons” and “prisoner’s...
33/ ...dilemma” scenarios (real world examples: “vulture capitalism” destroying Sears, Toys“R”Us, etc...). Other such problems can be revealed by game theory, another area of weakness that MIRT shares with the Austrian School.
34/ In addition to the communal problems listed above, MIRT poses other moral dilemmas with regard to the relationship of a man to the other women in his life: his mother, sisters and daughters. For example, MIRT’s ethic of egoism indicates that a father should: (1)...
35/ ...accept his daughter being one of many other females concurrently appealing for the attention of a presumed “Alpha” male (this is MIRT’s recommended “Plate Theory”); that he should (2) accept his daughter “putting out” sexually for the presumed “Alpha” before a...
36/ ...commitment is had; and that he should (3) accept that the presumed “Alpha” will maintain “options” (maintain other relationships & abandon if it is “failed”). This same logic applies both to a man’s mother and his sisters.
37/ This reveals the second moral dilemma of MIRT in relation to the individual—the question of happiness or obedience? Put differently, love and sex involve choices. Choices are actions. Our actions express our values. And, according to the consistency principle,...
38/ ...people will change their attitudes, beliefs, perceptions and actions to achieve consistency with their actions (and vice-versa).
39/ Philosophically, this dilemma is expressed as whether to follow Nietzsche or Kant? That is: whether our values are ultimately centered upon God or Man? This is because the value claims in egoism (as fully expressed in MIRT) are ultimately incompatible with the...
40/ ...altruism and value claims of Judeo-Christianity. We can eventually embrace God (take the “Bread Pill”) or become nihilistic (take the “Black Pill”).
41/ The Black Pill: “Even to endure my seriousness, my passion, he must carry intellectual integrity to the verge of hardness….A new conscience for truths that have hitherto remained unheard….Reverence for self; love of self; absolute freedom of self....
42/ - Prologue to “The Antichrist,” by Friedrich W. Nietzsche.
43/ Nietzsche believed the majority of men prefer delusion to truth. For him, society was engaged in an endless struggle of weak against the strong, fit against the unfit, and quantity against quality. This theme animated his contempt and hatred towards democracy in...
44/ ...all its forms--Socialism, Puritanism and Christianity.
45/ Contempt for the old beliefs (as seen in Mr. Tomassi’s generalized objection to the “old books” or “old ideas”) is apparent in MIRT. Nietzsche saw Christian ethics (beneath its show of altruism and purported benefits) as a democratic effort to curb the egoism of...
46/ ...the strong and the progress of mankind. He writes: “We deny that God is God.... Such a religion as Christianity ... must be inevitably the deadly enemy of the ‘wisdom of this world,’ which is to say, of science—and it will give the name of good to whatever...
47/ ...means serve to poison, calumniate and cry down all intellectual discipline, all lucidity and strictness in matters of intellectual conscience, and all noble coolness and freedom of the mind. ‘Faith,’ as an imperative, vetoes science….” Id at 136.
48/ MIRT cannot abide the “weakening” strictures of moral commands. For Nietzsche, when the “natural consequences of an act are no longer ‘natural,’ but are regarded as produced by the ghostly creations of superstition—by “God,” by “spirits,” by “souls”—and reckoned...
49/ ...as merely “moral” consequences, as rewards, as punishments, as hints, as lessons, then the whole ground-work of knowledge is destroyed.” This is why the “greatest of crimes against humanity” was the “invention of sin,” which in “make[s] science, culture, and...
50/ ...every elevation and ennobling of man impossible.” Id at 141.
51/ MIRT cannot realize its objective to elevate a man to his full potential (the “male imperative”) with the handcuffs of “sin” and moral prohibition. “I repeat that sin, man’s self-desecration par excellence, was invented in order to make science, culture, and...
52/ ...every elevation and ennobling of man impossible; the priest rules through the invention of sin.”
53/ To fully embrace MIRT one must repudiate Christianity. “Christianity ... [is] the corruption of souls by means of the concepts of guilt, punishment and immortality.” Id at 171. He concludes: “I condemn Christianity; I bring against the Christian church the most...
54/ ...terrible of all the accusations that an accuser has ever had in his mouth… it seeks to work the ultimate corruption, the worst possible corruption.... The Christian church has left nothing untouched by its depravity; it has turned every value into...
55/ ...worthlessness, and every truth into a lie, and every integrity into baseness of soul. Parasitism as the only practice of the church; with its anæmic and “holy” ideals, sucking all the blood, all the love, all the hope out of life; the beyond as the will to...
56/ ...deny all reality; the cross as the distinguishing mark of the most subterranean conspiracy ever heard of,—against health, beauty, well-being, intellect, kindness of soul—against life itself....” Id at 180-181.
57/ This book was written shortly before Nietzsche’s nervous breakdown. A life decoupled from metaphysical truth is first disordered, then becomes hopeless. Nihilism inevitably leads to rage. Rage leads violence—towards oneself (suicide) or others. The antithesis of...
58/ ...this was Viktor Frankl’s great revelation in Man’s Search for Meaning: “For the first time in my life I saw the truth as it is set into song by so many poets, proclaimed as the final wisdom by so many thinkers. The truth - that Love is the ultimate and highest...
59/ ...goal to which man can aspire. Then I grasped the meaning of the greatest secret that human poetry and human thought and belief have to impart: The salvation of man is through love and in love.” In short, this timeless truth is what set apart the men who died...
60/ ...shortly after arriving in the Nazi concentration camps, versus those who persevered the longest (he, himself, was a survivor).
61/ Immanuel Kant represents the opposite of Nietzsche’s ideas: reason has both a practical (means-ends and moral choice) and theoretical function (ex: science). Kant did not equate moral reason with the calculative reason of the utilitarians or the egoists.
62/ He understood that practical reason has its proper place, but that means-ends calculations must be supported with a different type of reasoning—moral reasoning.
63/ Kant sought to build a foundation for moral principles to apply to all people in all times and cultures with a foundation grounded in the understanding and fidelity to the “categorical imperative” which is as follows: “Act according to the maxim that you would...
64/ ...wish all other rational people to follow, as if it were a universal law.” This concept—although similar to the “golden rule”--is more elaborate and grounded in rationality. For Kant, the categorical is a way of formulating the criteria by which any action can...
65/ ...pass the test of universality, impartiality, and rationality. On this basis we can evaluate actions and make moral judgments.
66/ The existence of God, freedom of the will, good vs. evil, immortality of the soul—were issues that Kant believed could be maintained on a rational basis. Put differently, we should act as if they were real, despite empirical evidence, because of their tremendous...
67/ ...importance for our practical and ethical lives (on this point, Jordan Peterson borrows much from Kant in his debates with atheist Sam Harris). Further, the highest good requires the postulation of immortality and the existence of God to preserve our motivation...
68/ ...to be moral from being undermined by the thought of the irrationality of attempting to do what morality commands us to do.
69/ Another way to define the CI is that we ought to act only on maxims that can be universalized without self-contradiction. Kant’s “Theory of the Good” is focused on intention and will. Morally praiseworthy acts are done out of a sense of duty rather than for the...
70/ ...consequences that are expected, particularly the consequences to self. Thus, the only thing “good” about the act is the “will.” That will is to do our duty. Therefore, our duty is to act in such a manner that we would want everyone else to act in a similar...
71/ ...manner in similar circumstances towards all other people.
72/ For Kant, moral evil in human beings is explained by their propensity to subordinate the moral law to inclination. It is only the determination of the will to prioritize self-love over morality that is to be called radical evil. The will has an “inscrutable”...
73/ ...freedom to choose between the subordination of self-love to the moral law and the converse. Consequently, the ethical choice facing the moral agent is either to subordinate all other maxims to the moral law, or to subordinate the moral law with every other...
74/ ...maxim to an egoistic alternative.
75/ Since MIRT’s axioms are ultimately based in egoism, they cannot provide the basis for a healthy and stable long-term marriage. Real love, as expressed in marriage, requires a sacrifice of natural instincts and a determined act of the will. J.R.R...
76/ Tolkien’s letter to his son expresses this deep truth:
77/ “Men are not [monogamous]. No good pretending. Men just ain’t, not by their animal nature. Monogamy … is for us men a piece of ‘revealed ethic,’ according to faith and not the flesh. The essence of a fallen world is that the best cannot be attained by free...
78/ ...enjoyment, or by what is called ‘self-realization’ (usually a nice name for self-indulgence... but by denial, by suffering. Faithfulness in Christian marriages entails that: great mortification.
79/ For a Christian man there is no escape. Marriage may help to sanctify and direct to its proper object his sexual desires; its grace may help him in the struggle; but the struggle remains. It will not satisfy him—as hunger may be kept off by regular meals.
80/ It will offer as many difficulties to the purity proper to that state as it provides easements.
81/ No man, however truly he loved his betrothed and bride as a young man, has lived faithful to her as a wife in mind and body without deliberate conscious exercise of the will, without self-denial. Too few are told that—even those brought up in ‘the Church’.
82/ Those outside seem seldom to have heard it.
83/ When the glamour wears off, or merely works a bit thin, they think that they have made a mistake, and that the real soul-mate is still to find. The real soul-mate too often proves to be the next sexually attractive person that comes along. Someone whom they might...
84/ ...indeed very profitably have married, if only—. Hence divorce, to provide the ‘if only’.
85/ And of course they are as a rule quite right: they did make a mistake. Only a very wise man at the end of his life could make a sound judgement concerning whom, amongst the total possible chances, he ought most profitably have married! Nearly all marriages, even...
86/ ...happy ones, are mistakes: in the sense that almost certainly (in a more perfect world, or even with a little more care in this very imperfect one) both partners might have found more suitable mates. But the ‘real soul-mate’ is the one you are actually married to.
87/ In this fallen world, we have as our only guides, prudence, wisdom (rare in youth, too late in age), a clean heart, and fidelity of will…”
88/ Successful marriages are possible. Embracing true masculinity and femininity is positive. True joy and happiness in marriage is possible but only if based upon mutual self-sacrifice. This is the ideal God intended and the blueprint we are to follow: husbands are...
89/ ...to love the same way Christ loved his bride, the Church; and just as the church is subject to Christ, so also wives ought to be to their husbands.
Missing some Tweet in this thread?
You can try to force a refresh.

Like this thread? Get email updates or save it to PDF!

Subscribe to MagnusStout
Profile picture

Get real-time email alerts when new unrolls are available from this author!

This content may be removed anytime!

Twitter may remove this content at anytime, convert it as a PDF, save and print for later use!

Try unrolling a thread yourself!

how to unroll video

1) Follow Thread Reader App on Twitter so you can easily mention us!

2) Go to a Twitter thread (series of Tweets by the same owner) and mention us with a keyword "unroll" @threadreaderapp unroll

You can practice here first or read more on our help page!

Follow Us on Twitter!

Did Thread Reader help you today?

Support us! We are indie developers!


This site is made by just three indie developers on a laptop doing marketing, support and development! Read more about the story.

Become a Premium Member ($3.00/month or $30.00/year) and get exclusive features!

Become Premium

Too expensive? Make a small donation by buying us coffee ($5) or help with server cost ($10)

Donate via Paypal Become our Patreon

Thank you for your support!