01. Another thread - this one about gratitude. Histories are built on original research, but also move along paths cleared by others. Because the academy rewards overstating novelty our many intellectual debts often go unacknowledged.
02. There's a wonderful body of work on the Southern Philippines under Spanish and American colonialism. It's produced by researchers from a range of disciplines and sub-fields, whose creative approaches and granular understandings of the region and its peoples are inspiring.
03. My book's release is a good opportunity to foreground the writings of these scholars. Some of them I know personally and others I've never met, but each (knowingly or unknowingly) helped me along the way. Here it goes, in no particular order:
04. Summing up Patricio Abinales' enormous impact on Mindanao studies in a single tweet is impossible. His first book, Making Mindanao, got me started on the subject. Begin with that and then read the rest: uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/making-m…
05. The late Donna Amoroso wrote primarily on colonial Malaya, but her article comparing British and American colonialisms in Southeast Asia provided an important template for thinking about the region transimperially. You can find it here: dukeupress.edu/the-american-c…
06. Joshua Gedacht has published widely on Mindanao and the Sulu Archipelago, recently co-editing a collection on coercive cosmopolitanism. He brilliantly situates the region within wider Islamic contexts. A recent chapter appears here: bloomsbury.com/us/american-an…
07. The richest recent work on Lumad identities and histories is by @oona_paredes. Her articles shaped my understandings of Mindanao's ethnocultural landscape and her book is the seminal text on Lumad encounters with Spanish colonialism: cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/978087727…
08. Michael Hawkins’ first book, Making Moros, reconceptualized military governance in the Moro Province. His new book, Semi-Civilized, looks at Moro-American interactions at the 1904 World's Fair: cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/978160909…
09. Few researchers have spent more time in or written more extensively on Mindanao than Midori Kawashima. I’m honestly not even sure where to begin because her contributions are so many. Perhaps take a look at her website: kawashimamidori.jp/research_activ…
10. Sacred Interests by @karinewalther is one of the very best studies of U.S. entanglements in the Islamic world. Her book brilliantly links together a century of diverse American interventions in Muslim spaces (including the Southern Philippines): uncpress.org/book/978146964…
11. Patricia Irene Dacudao’s articles and recent dissertation are the authoritative texts on the plantation complex in colonial Davao. If you want to learn about how capital and settlers remade Mindanao read her work. I’m very excited for her book: semanticscholar.org/paper/ABACA%3A…
12. …and likewise excited for Timothy Marr’s next book. A leading scholar on U.S.-Muslim cultural relations, Tim has produced the most thorough accounts we have of the Lebanese-American colonial official Najeeb Saleeby and Sultan Jamalul Kiram II of Sulu. lebanesestudies.ojs.chass.ncsu.edu/index.php/mash…
13. The eminent global historian William Clarence-Smith is also working on a large project connected to the Southern Philippines, to which he brings his encyclopaedic knowledge of Asian and African worlds.
14. An insightful essay he wrote on Moro-Middle East connections appears in this volume: global.oup.com/academic/produ…
15. Jeffrey Ayala Milligan's work taught me a lot about the educational systems in colonial Mindanao and Sulu. His 2005 book incorporates them into the larger story of struggles over schooling in the postcolonial Philippines: palgrave.com/gp/book/978981…
16. Four decades on, Peter Gowing’s publications remain key texts on U.S. colonial governance in the Southern Philippines. Reading Mandate in Moroland is a great way to get your mind around the structure of the Moro Province: amazon.co.uk/Mandate-Morola…
17. Northern debates over the future of Mindanao are adeptly handled by Nobutaka Suzuki, whose work probes the relationship between Filipino and Moro identities as an independent Philippines came was imagined and enacted: cambridge.org/core/journals/…
18. There is no better guide to the social and economic life of the “Sulu Zone” than the person who coined the term, James Francis Warren. And no better place to start than his now-classic work: nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/the-s…
19. Michael Salman’s study of American responses to slavery in the Philippines is crucial for understanding intersections between race, religion, and labor during the early years of U.S. imperial rule: ucpress.edu/book/978052024…
20. Thomas McKenna’s Muslim Rulers and Rebels is a close reading of Cotabato across the colonial / postcolonial divide and a remarkable study of Moro and Lumad groups negotiating the transition: ucpress.edu/book/978052021…
21. And, finally (for now): Samuel Tan has been working on Mindanao and Sulu longer than anybody – getting through his publication list is daunting! Check out this recent collection of essays: uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/the-musl…
22. I feel pre-emptively guilty about anyone I’ve missed, but hopefully this gives you a sense of amazing range of material being produced. There are four or five really great books in prep, and probably others I’m not yet aware of.
23. Point being: scholarship begets scholarship. Thanks to all the above and many others who guided me.

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More from @olaferr

15 Sep
01. Forgive me this last bit of self-promotion. My book, Civilizational Imperatives, is released today. It tells the story of the colonial encounter between Americans and the Moro peoples of the Southern Philippines, ranging from 1898 to the 1940s. This is the cover:
02. You can purchase the book from all the usual places, but I'd encourage you to support university presses and buy directly from Cornell. If you use the code 09FLYER you'll receive 30% off: cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/978150175…
03. For those unfamiliar with this iteration of U.S. imperialism, what follows is some (not-so-brief) backgrounding.
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