@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure "[P]aid less"? Try working less, @NoahZukowski.

"[O]nce we control only for one variable—hours worked—and compare men and women both working 40-hours per week in 2017, more than one-third of the raw 18.2% pay gap reported by the BLS disappears" (fee.org/articles/a-new…).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure Did you know that “unmarried, childless women under 30 who live in cities” already out-earn men pursuant to @TIME Magazine (content.time.com/time/business/…), @usnews & World Report (usnews.com/debate-club/sh…), and @PolitiFact's @PunditFact (politifact.com/punditfact/sta…)?
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact "What’s especially interesting is that women working 35-39 hours per week [in 2017] earned 107% of men’s earnings for those weekly hours, i.e., there was a 7% gender earnings gap in favor of female workers for that cohort" (fee.org/articles/a-new…).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact The problem is that if you add up both the unpaid labor and paid labor, men work more total time than women creating a #GenderedLaborGap pursuant to the @BLS_gov's 2017 American Time Use Survey (bls.gov/news.release/a…) and @pewresearch data (pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018…).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch According to the @BLS_gov, "[o]n the days they worked, employed men worked 49 minutes more than employed women. … However, even among full-time workers (those usually working 35 hours or more per week), men worked more per day than women—8.4 hours, compared with 7.9 hours."
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Pursuant to @BLS_gov data in the American Time Use Survey, the average man is getting the equivalent of over 26½ (8-hour) days of experience more than the average woman is getting on the job (bls.gov/news.release/a…, p. 2).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Dividing the total hours worked into 8-hour workdays, using the @BLS_gov data from the American Time Use Survey, it's almost as if men (on average) are working 13 months a year to women's less than 12 months per year (bls.gov/news.release/a…, p. 2).

This adds up over time.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Now, looking only at full-time workers, pursuant to @BLS_gov data in the American Time Use Survey, the average man is getting the equivalent of over 16 (8-hour) days of experience more than the average woman is getting on the job (bls.gov/news.release/a…, p. 2).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Dividing the total hours worked into 8-hour workdays, using the @BLS_gov data from the American Time Use Survey, it's almost as if men (on average) are working nearly 12½ months a year to women's less than 12 (bls.gov/news.release/a…, p. 2).

Albeit slower, this adds up fast.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch American Time Use Survey (with 2017 as an example) shows that women on average are not spending enough more time with their kids, doing chores, or anything else to justify women's lack of time working.

On average, men just work more in America (considering both paid and unpaid).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Let's do the math:

Table 8A, column 1: Men: Women:
Household activities: 1.31 2.34
Caring for household: 1.01 1.85
Work-related activities: 5.46 3.37
==========
Total: 7.78 7.56
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Now comparing the men from Table 8B to the women from Table 8C (where the youngest child is under 6):

Women care for and help household members 2.08 more hours per day than men in the most extreme case presented by Table 8A, but men work 6.43 hours more per day than women.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Similarly, comparing the men from Table 8B to the women from Table 8C (where the youngest child is under 6), women do household activities for 1.91 more hours per day than men in the most extreme case presented by Table 8A, but, again, men work 6.43 hours more per day than women.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Let's do the math: Men: Women:
Household activities: 1.26 3.17
Caring for household: 1.42 3.36
Work-related activities: 6.57 0.00
==========
Total: 9.25 6.53

Equal, @NoahZukowski?
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch By comparing the men from Table 8B to the women from Table 8C (using the youngest child under 6 column), we see the situation where women are unemployed and spending the most time caring not only for the children but the whole family.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Other @BLS_gov data (see below) indicates that 61% of families have both parents employed (bls.gov/opub/ted/2017/…), but does not indicate whether the mothers are working full-time or part-time.

The American Time Use Survey does have an answer in Table 8B.

Let's check that out.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Let's do the math:

Table 8B, column 1: Men: Women:
Household activities: 1.23 1.90
Caring for household: 0.93 1.52
Work-related activities: 6.35 5.01
===========
Total: 8.51 8.43
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Maybe women are forced to stay home with their kids and that causes the gap. If true, women with no kids should be working the same amount as men in the workforce as there is no reason not to since there is no reason to be on call and no extra household or child care duties.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Let's do that math:

Table 8A, column 4: Men: Women:
Household activities: 1.54 2.21
Caring for household: 0.07 0.07
Work-related activities: 4.11 2.83
===========
Total: 5.72 5.11
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Consider just workers:

Table 8B, column 4: Men: Women:
Household activities: 1.34 1.80
Caring for household: 0.04 0.05
Work-related activities: 6.17 5.29
===========
Total: 7.55 7.14
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Whether you consider all currently childless folks (Table 8A) or just the ones working (Table 8B), women spend less time on paid labor and related activities and women spend less time working considering both unpaid domestic labor and paid labor added together. The pattern holds.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch Women being less productive than men (and that contributing to the pay gap) is apparently not news.

@LexyTopping writes "[m]en should work less and their employers and the government should help them to do so in order to close the gender pay gap" (google.com/amp/s/amp.theg…).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch @LexyTopping On page 5 of _The State of Pay: Demystifying the Gender Pay Gap_ (May 2018), Institute for Public Policy Research writes as part of their 3rd recommendation that "[c]hanging men’s working behaviour is a crucial component of closing the gender pay gap" (ippr.org/files/2018-05/…).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch @LexyTopping "To reduce the gender stratification of full and part-time roles, and reduce the maternity penalty, employers could… introduce dedicated, paid paternity leave…, to advertise roles as flexible by default, and to encourage men to partake in job share arrangements." Id., p. 5.
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch @LexyTopping The @IPPR continues stating that the pay gap "doesn’t take into account any of the drivers of different pay levels, such as age, qualifications, experience or seniority, or type of work" (ippr.org/files/2018-05/…, p. 6).
@NoahZukowski @PotipharJo @CodeLaure @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact @BLS_gov @pewresearch @LexyTopping @IPPR "As such, a firm-level gender pay gap does not indicate discriminatory practices, and is not unlawful" (ippr.org/files/2018-05/…, p. 6).

Is reasonably expecting (and getting) more pay than men (on average) despite working less than men (on average) a privilege, @NoahZukowski?

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More from @MSS3RosaFerreum

20 Sep
@Mementos1234 @TruismsT @jesswana @PotipharJo @rascallycake @MisterMarilyn @jk_rowling It was taken down, unfortunately. However, there are two alternate sources. This will have my page number cites correct (academic.oup.com/qje/article-ab…) and This one will not (nber.org/papers/w19023), but it is free.
@Mementos1234 @TruismsT @jesswana @PotipharJo @rascallycake @MisterMarilyn @jk_rowling "[W]hen the wife earns more than the husband, the likelihood of divorce increases by about 6[%]… [and s]ince 12[%] of couples in the sample get divorced, this … implies that having the wife earn more than the husband increases the likelihood of divorce by 50[%]" (free, p. 25).
@Mementos1234 @TruismsT @jesswana @PotipharJo @rascallycake @MisterMarilyn @jk_rowling "[T]he data suggest that married women may sometimes stay out of the labor force so as to avoid a situation where they would become the primary breadwinner" (nber.org/papers/w19023.… or free, p. 596).

It appears that there was some slight editing between the versions.
Read 4 tweets
15 Sep
@PadmaLakshmi @NewYorker …but does the data support that she would be taking on more responsibility than he would?

There is a #GenderedLaborGap, but It is probably not what you think it is, @PadmaLakshmi.

Let's look at the data!
@PadmaLakshmi @NewYorker If you add up both the unpaid labor and paid labor, on average, men work more total time than women creating a #GenderedLaborGap pursuant to the @BLS_gov's 2017 American Time Use Survey (bls.gov/news.release/a…) and @pewresearch data (pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018…).
@PadmaLakshmi @NewYorker @BLS_gov @pewresearch American Time Use Survey (with 2017 as an example) shows that women on average are not spending enough more time with their kids, doing chores, or anything else to justify women's lack of time working.

On average, men just work more in America (considering both paid and unpaid).
Read 17 tweets
12 Sep
@caitskirby Part of the issue is there are two disabled communities that have vastly different needs (but they do overlap creating confusion).

The one I represent professionally has work-preclusive impairments; the other community is trying to not be discriminated against in the workplace.
@caitskirby The one trying to get into the workplace without being discriminated against pushes for "differently-abled," "handicapable," and so on as "disabled" implies they can't do the work that they want to have the opportunity to do (and they can actually do with little accommodation).
@caitskirby Those with work-preclusive disabilities are actively harmed by this can-do rhetoric because politicians and the public-at-large haven't figured out that there are 2 very different though slightly overlapping disabled populations.

What's the harm experienced?
Read 8 tweets
25 Aug
@StoneyGuardian @KenFGalaxy @Judith_Char @yuppy2501 More to the point, the @FBI indicated that false rape accusations are 400% greater than for other crimes (ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u…).

However, let us turn to the work of scholars and what those scholars found reviewing the literature, shall we?
@StoneyGuardian @KenFGalaxy @Judith_Char @yuppy2501 @FBI Consider Philip N.S. Rumney, "False Allegations of Rape," 65 _Cambridge Law Journal_ 128 (2006) (available: eprints.uwe.ac.uk/6478/1/Downloa…) who reviewed a number of the studies that are often cited in these discussions. This is NOT a metastudy, but it is a law review article.
@StoneyGuardian @KenFGalaxy @Judith_Char @yuppy2501 @FBI Since I don't really expect you to do much footwork, @KenFGalaxy, here are the studies that Mr. Rumney considered that the false rape allegation percentage found by each (from Table 1 from 65 Cambridge Law Journal 136–137):
Read 30 tweets
25 Aug
@lillaambrus @UN_Women I understand my chart quite well. Let's go through it piece by piece. My understanding is based upon well-correlated data and I am not the first one to make this observation.

I would be interested in what books you would recommend to see if there is conflicting information.
@lillaambrus @UN_Women To start, “unmarried, childless women under 30 who live in cities” already out-earn men pursuant to @TIME Magazine (content.time.com/time/business/…), @usnews & World Report (usnews.com/debate-club/sh…), and @PolitiFact's @PunditFact (politifact.com/punditfact/sta…).
@lillaambrus @UN_Women @TIME @usnews @PolitiFact @PunditFact "What’s especially interesting is that women working 35-39 hours per week [in 2017] earned 107% of men’s earnings for those weekly hours, i.e., there was a 7% gender earnings gap in favor of female workers for that cohort" (fee.org/articles/a-new…).
Read 29 tweets
24 Aug
@UN_Women Not in the United States of America 🇺🇸 according to the United States Department of Labor (@USDOL).

Upon what, @UN_Women, are you basing your claim () that "[w]omen do 3 times as much unpaid care and domestic work as men"?

Citation is needed!
@UN_Women @USDOL The problem is that if you add up both the unpaid domestic labor and paid labor, men work more total time than women creating a #GenderedLaborGap pursuant to the @BLS_gov's 2017 American Time Use Survey (bls.gov/news.release/a…) and @pewresearch data (pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018…).
@UN_Women @USDOL @BLS_gov @pewresearch The #genderpaygap parallels the #GenderedLaborGap.

"[O]nce we control only for one variable—hours worked—and compare men and women both working 40-hours per week in 2017, more than one-third of the raw 18.2% pay gap reported by the BLS disappears" (fee.org/articles/a-new…).
Read 25 tweets

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