While we wait, the fiscal note on the governor's original bill has some interesting information about other taxes in the 9 states without income taxes wvlegislature.gov/Fiscalnotes/FN…
The average sales tax rate in Florida is 7.08%. Among other tax base differences, sales tax applies on the lease of commercial real estate and on public utility services (e.g., electricity and water) provided to businesses
Florida also imposes a 7.44% gross receipts tax on all telecommunications services
Several excise taxes are much higher in Florida, including beer (167% higher), wine (125% higher), snuff and chewing tobacco (608% higher), cigarettes (11.6% higher) and motor fuel (18.9% highe
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is more than 2.5 times greater in Florida than in West Virginia.
commercial real estate taxes are roughly double in Florida and industrial real estate taxes are more than 60% higher in Florida
New Hampshire imposes higher general business taxes than West Virginia, including a business profits income tax of 7.7% on net profits from corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies and sole proprietors
In addition to the profits tax, the State imposes a 0.6% value added tax with wages paid accounting for a significant portion of the base. The State also imposes a flat 5% tax on dividends and interest earned by individuals
New Hampshire imposes 9% tax on meals and lodging and a 7% tax on telecommunications services.
Certain excise taxes are higher in New Hampshire, including beer (66.7% higher), cigarettes (48.3% higher), snuff, chewing tobacco, and cigars (442% higher), and e-cigarettes (up to 300% higher).
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with average an income of $87,000 is more than 3.4 times greater in New Hampshire than in West Virginia.
commercial real estate taxes are roughly double in New Hampshire and industrial real estate taxes are roughly 20% higher in New Hampshire
Tennessee imposes higher overall consumption taxes in comparison with West Virginia with some portion applicable to business inputs
Tennessee taxes food for home consumption at a lower average rate of 6.25%. The Tennessee tax base also includes digital goods, and certain public utility services purchased by businesses.
TN imposes higher general business taxes than WV, including a flat 6.5% business income tax on net profits of corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies, a 0.25% franchise tax on business net worth or value of property, and a business gross receipts tax
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is roughly 56% greater in Tennessee than in West Virginia
Alaska benefits significantly from an energy sector that is 2.9 times larger on a per capita basis than the energy sector in West Virginia. In addition, the State receives significant royalty income from its publicly owned mineral lands
Several excise taxes are much higher in Alaska, including beer (494% higher), wine (150% higher), snuff, chewing tobacco and cigars (525% higher) and cigarettes (66.7% higher)
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is more than 2.6 times greater in Alaska than in West Virginia
Nevada imposes two separate business taxes in lieu of a broad-based personal income tax. The Commerce Tax is a gross receipt-type tax with 27 different rates depending on business classification ranging from 0.051% to 0.331%.
Nevada also imposes a separate business payroll tax of 1.475% on business payroll in excess of $50,000 per quarter.
the average sales tax rate in Nevada is 8.23%. Among other tax base differences, Nevada taxes machinery used in manufacturing, equipment used in pollution control abatement and certain public utility services consumed by businesses.
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is roughly 60% higher in Nevada than in West Virginia.
commercial real estate taxes are roughly 25% higher in Nevada than in West Virginia.
the average sales tax rate in South Dakota is 6.4%. tax applies to most professional services and personal services, contracting services, advertising services, public utility services , groceries, manufacturing machinery and equipment, and digital goods provided to businesses.
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is 2.3 times greater in South Dakota than in West Virginia.
commercial real estate taxes are roughly 70% higher in South Dakota.
Texas imposes a modified gross receipts tax on businesses in lieu of a broad-based personal income tax. The Texas Gross Margins Tax applies to business gross receipts minus cost of goods sold or minus partial payroll with tax rates ranging between 0.331% and 0.75%.
the average sales tax rate in Texas is 8.19%
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is 3.5 times greater in Texas than in West Virginia.
commercial real estate taxes are roughly double in Texas and industrial real estate taxes are roughly 130% higher in Texas
Texas also imposes significant tangible personal property taxes on machinery, equipment and inventory.

(WV is trying to get rid of this tax too)
Washington State imposes a broad-based business gross receipts tax (i.e., Business and Occupation Tax) in lieu of a broad-based personal income tax.
the average sales tax rate in Washington is 9.23%
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is 2.7 times greater in Washington State than in West Virginia.
Wyoming benefits significantly from an energy sector that is 3.3 times bigger on a per capita basis than the energy sector in West Virginia. In addition, the State receives significant royalty income from its publicly owned mineral lands.
the average real estate tax on a home owned by a family with an average income of $87,000 is more than 35% higher in Wyoming than in West Virginia.
According to the fiscal note, WV has lower per capita state and local taxes than NH, AK, NV, SD, TX, WA, and WY
Does any of this sound good to WV?

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More from @OLearySW

6 Apr
Flashing back to 2017's extended special session. Included in that call - phasing out the income tax, raising the sales tax, and tiering the severance tax.

It didn't work then, and nothing has changed since governor.wv.gov/News/press-rel…
In 2017, Jim Justice asked us to "Remember Who Brung You To This Terrible Dance"

Who brung us this year? governor.wv.gov/News/press-rel…
I had forgot all about "mediator in chief" Justice sending the legislators to their rooms and going back and forth trying to sell his tax plan governor.wv.gov/News/press-rel…
Read 4 tweets
6 Apr
And it would still raise taxes on low and middle income households next year
Even with the income tax fully eliminated, the Senate plan would give the typical household in WV a net tax cut of only $147, or 0.34%.

Households in the top 1% would get a tax cut of $34,322, or 4.4%
Those right above 35,000 will actually see a tax increase, as they won't qualify for the sales tax rebate, will only see small savings from the income tax cut, and will get all of the tax increases.
Read 4 tweets
5 Apr
ICYMI: The Senate’s tax plan, just like the Governor’s, is another tax shift, with the savings from eliminating the income tax wiped out by regressive increases to sales and grocery taxes for most low and middle income West Virginians. wvpolicy.org/senate-income-… Image
None of the income tax plans proposed by the governor, House, or Senate, have been revenue neutral as promised, meaning substantial budget cuts will be necessary, and soon. Image
And we know where those cuts will happen: eliminating the Promise, defunding colleges and universities, ending health and education programs, and 20% across the board budget cuts, in addition to regressive tax increases are all on the table wvgazettemail.com/news/legislati…
Read 6 tweets
4 Feb
Unemployment claims remain high in West Virginia, as another 2,550 initial regular claims were filed last week, along with another 1,700 PUA claims dol.gov/ui/data.pdf
Continued claims rose to 23,990 for the week ending 1/23, up 2,477 from the week prior. Continued claims had dipped below 20,000 briefly in December, but have been rising ever since.
As I expected continued PUA claims jumped back up, now that uncertainty over the program's extension has passed. For the week ending 1/16 WV had 16,951 continued PUA claims, up from 8,535 the week prior.
Read 5 tweets
3 Feb
If the plan to eliminate the income tax is "revenue neutral" as Blair claims, then there would be no need to be "finding efficiencies in state government."
But since the plan is obviously not going to be revenue neutral (otherwise why do it?), here's what "finding efficiencies" might look like wvpolicy.org/how-do-you-pay…
"Finding efficiencies" is an odd euphemism for "eliminating all state funding for WVU and Marshall and ending the PROMISE scholarship" dragline.substack.com/p/leaked-docum…
Read 4 tweets
2 Feb
Last week I outlined what eliminating the the income tax in WV might look like, including a big increase in the sales tax, and major cuts to higher education and other public services.

It seemed over-the-top, but it turns out, that's what the plan is. dragline.substack.com/p/leaked-docum…
Under this plan, which is typical of plans to eliminate the income tax, would ask most West Virginians to pay more in taxes and get fewer services in return, provide less investment in education and health care, all in order to give a tax cut to the wealthiest in the state.
Read 4 tweets

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