Z and I were both tired and on edge tonight. There was some definite tension going on, that was building as Z got ready to go to bed. Then, I decided to change my attitude, and I put my energy into being silly instead of angry.
I became over the top silly, and she couldn’t help but start laughing and being silly in return. We ended up ending the night in a positive manner that lifted both of our spirits. You would be surprised at the relief YOU get as a parent, when you put anger away.
Now, I promise you this: I do not always make the right choice. I don’t always win against my own challenges, and I make mistakes in how I handle things. But, this is an important reminder…
You are allowed to be proud of your parenting achievements. When you kept calm, refused to act in anger, and made a choice that everyone felt good about - good for you. Be proud, and keeping finding new ways to make yourself proud!
Unlearning toxic parenting is hard. It’s really hard. But, every time you do, it pays off. And, when I say “you”, I mean me, because I am there,too. Every single day is an opportunity to learn to be better. I don’t always take that opportunity, but I do what I can.
As we work to make a happier future for our children; we make a happier future for ourselves. Love you, good night.

• • •

Missing some Tweet in this thread? You can try to force a refresh
 

Keep Current with Brandi Thompson

Brandi Thompson Profile picture

Stay in touch and get notified when new unrolls are available from this author!

Read all threads

This Thread may be Removed Anytime!

PDF

Twitter may remove this content at anytime! Save it as PDF for later use!

Try unrolling a thread yourself!

how to unroll video
  1. Follow @ThreadReaderApp to mention us!

  2. From a Twitter thread mention us with a keyword "unroll"
@threadreaderapp unroll

Practice here first or read more on our help page!

More from @awesomebrandi

1 Oct
Even at my MOST FIT, I was still disabled. I just didn't know it, and instead I constantly overdid it, causing myself MORE pain, and dismissing my own valid disability issues. Instead of seeking help for the pain I was experiencing, I told myself I just needed to be tougher.
I would look at other people who could run daily, or do tough, hour long workouts daily. I never could do that. No matter how 'fit' I was, I would still experience pain and fatigue. Basically, my body would force me into recovery days, and I would feel awful.
And, of course, in the times I DID try bringing it up, doctors would tell me nothing was wrong. When I was pregnant with O, I started having these issues with my left middle toe. I STILL HAVE THEM! Almost 9 years later!
Read 8 tweets
19 Sep
So, what IF someone who self-diagnosed as Autistic was wrong? What exactly is going to happen? It's not like 'officially' diagnosed Autistic people are being showered with endless support and acceptance, so what exactly is a self-diagnosed person harming? NOTHING.
People who realize they are Autistic do it because they've been searching for something. They've been trying to understand themselves, why they see the world the way they do and looking for community. Why is that a bad thing? Why is someone feeling at home in their skin, bad?
It's NOT bad, but what people don't like is that self-diagnosis puts the power in the hands of the people, instead of the elite few. People don't WANT disabled people to have their own power. People want to continue to control and deny disabled people.
Read 9 tweets
17 Sep
I was misdiagnosed as bipolar as a teenager, heavily medicated, forced into hospitals and harmful 'professionals' which left me with serious trauma and never actually helped me feel better with any of my challenges.
It wasn't until realizing I was Autistic and ADHD, and then being on ADHD medication, that really changed my life. I have been on SO MANY medications for 'mental illness' and nothing has worked like ADHD medication has.
Doctors, professionals, etc are NOT immune to bias. The DSM has been modified many times, and still needs further modification. There is a big difference in what people understand about the brain vs the body. Science is ALWAYS a work in progress.
Read 16 tweets
17 Sep
So, O was not happy with me last night after an encounter right before I was going to put him to bed. So, he went to my spouse and wanted HIM to put him to bed. He was trying to pull him up the stairs to do bedtime instead of me.
I am sorry he was annoyed with me for the necessary thing that happened, and we have already had our moment, but I loved seeing him express himself and his wants, and we switched kids for bedtime. Like, even if he was mad at me at the time, he's allowed, and he expressed it.
Sometimes my kids are going to get mad at me. They aren't always going to agree with me. That's allowed. They are human and they're allowed to disagree with their parents. They're allowed to disagree with other adults, too.
Read 4 tweets
16 Sep
If you aren't a nonspeaking Autistic, you simply cannot understand what it is like to be one. I am Autistic & I will never FULLY understand what it's like to have such a strong body/mind mismatch like what my son has. We have a lot of commonalities, but we aren't the SAME.
It has been a journey to try and understand. Like, I always knew he was this amazing fire inside, and he's certainly proven it, but it doesn't mean I know what it's like for him to live with his body and brain every single day.
And, I'm not trying to vilify it, but I know he's expressed he just doesn't know why his body reacts in certain ways at times. I know he gets frustrated when he cannot express himself the way he wants to at times. That's why I am really trying to give him as much as I can.
Read 10 tweets
14 Sep
I live in this really weird in between spot that not a lot of people live in. I grew up in extreme poverty, and now I am middle class. I live in a 'nice' neighborhood in a 'nice' house, that we happened to get a killer deal on at the time.
I normally feel like I don't belong here. I am still the poor girl that I grew up as, inside. Yet, I spend time with people who have money, and even if they had less growing up, not many people can relate to what I went through and how that trauma affected me.
It's hard for me to feel comfortable with people who've never experienced oppression of some sort. That's why pretty much all my friends are traumatized, disabled or both. Plus, a lot of immigrants and BIPOC. Those people are the people I feel safe with.
Read 10 tweets

Did Thread Reader help you today?

Support us! We are indie developers!


This site is made by just two indie developers on a laptop doing marketing, support and development! Read more about the story.

Become a Premium Member ($3/month or $30/year) and get exclusive features!

Become Premium

Too expensive? Make a small donation by buying us coffee ($5) or help with server cost ($10)

Donate via Paypal Become our Patreon

Thank you for your support!

Follow Us on Twitter!

:(