The "I'll pay $10k for someone to add MP to BotW" thing is not so much funny as scary. It shows how little the average person knows about the cost and effort that goes into game development, which drives a lot of player discourse and pushback against devs.
We have industry associations who should be doing more work to educate the populace around what we do, and media could also be more helpful with this (although some journalists genuinely try). I think devs are generally quite open about how we work and the effort involved.
It also shows a complete lack of understanding for how IP works. Even if you were willing to spend $100M to add MP to BotW, you wouldn't be able to, because only Nintendo has the right to do that (or to permit someone to do it via a license of some kind).
We're fortunate to have an amazing player community around #thelongdark but even we see it at times -- "how hard could it be to add ___ to the game?". It's also often couched in anger, "Lazy devs, why don't they just make it an option?"
One of the absolute wildest fallacies that exists within player communities around games is that you can easily add MP to a game after the fact. This idea has persisted for decades. It's been debunked and discussed countless times in countless discussions, and yet...
Do devs a favour and don't signal boost this sort of thinking. It's disrespectful and can be very harmful. Try to allow for the fact that if you don't actually know how to do something, maybe it's harder (even a lot harder?) than you think.
The "war on experts" that social media tends to encourage is one of the worst things to come out of platforms like twitter, FB, etc. Just b/c you have a platform doesn't mean you know what the fuck you are talking about. Haven't we learned that yet?
So as to avoid just being a complainer and not a solver, let's see if we can't help frame the discussion in a more positive way by finding things in games that can be done for roughly $10k, or explaining what some typical features might cost from an implementation standpoint.
I'll start.

* $10k will get you between 5-7.5 minutes of original music from a good composer.
* $10k will cover the cost of translating about 50,000-75,000 words of text into one language (depending on the language).
* $10k might cover the cost of trademarking your game name in ~1-2 territories, depending on how many Classes you try to protect yourself in.
* $10k might cover the cost of a small number of relatively polished (better than sketches, but nothing near final) pieces of concept art.
Flipping it the other way around, creating a single region in #thelongdark costs about $300k+, considering design time, art, testing, etc. And this is only if the artists are using mostly existing assets. The cost goes way up if you're adding new custom structures, etc.
Each of our Episodes costs multiple millions of $ to develop. And we are a relatively low-cost game in comparison to something triple-A like BotW.
Without having given it too much thought, if someone came to me and said, "we want you to add MP to BotW", and we had Nintendo's blessing/support to do so, it would probably cost...$15M? To do it right. IF it were even possible given how the tech works and how the game was made.
(And that would assume Nintendo provided access to the engine, all their assets, engineering support, translators (I assume all their code comments are in Japanese so we can't read them), etc. And EVEN THEN I would not do it b/c we have no expertise in MP games and we'd fail.)
(Update: Sorry if you are trying to have a reasonable discussion with me about this thread; I can't even read my twitter right now. Also I don't have a Soundcloud, but you can find our soundtrack on Bandcamp if you like: hinterlandstudio.bandcamp.com/album/music-fo…)
(And by "can't even read" I don't mean the content is too maddening or whatever, I mean there's so much of it incoming that I can't even really read it. I'll check back in a couple of days when things slow down a bit...)

• • •

Missing some Tweet in this thread? You can try to force a refresh
 

Keep Current with Raphael van Lierop (He/Him)

Raphael van Lierop (He/Him) Profile picture

Stay in touch and get notified when new unrolls are available from this author!

Read all threads

This Thread may be Removed Anytime!

PDF

Twitter may remove this content at anytime! Save it as PDF for later use!

Try unrolling a thread yourself!

how to unroll video
  1. Follow @ThreadReaderApp to mention us!

  2. From a Twitter thread mention us with a keyword "unroll"
@threadreaderapp unroll

Practice here first or read more on our help page!

More from @RaphLife

Jul 7, 2021
To my knowledge, there is still no standard format for game scripts. I've written for games for about 20 yrs and I've seen dozens of different formats, from straight up Final Draft screenplays to bespoke Excel spreadsheets to .txt files.
(Don't make your writers write original stuff in spreadsheets, ok? It's horrible. Let them write in Word or .doc or whatever and then create import scripts that bring them into Excel/Sheets and add tags or whatever. Writers generally do not want to write in spreadsheets.)
Over the years I've developed a bit of my own taste for a format I like, and I've used it extensively when writing #thelongdark. It's not "THE WAY" or anything like that, just a way that works for me. I thought I'd share a but about it for anyone that's interested.
Read 67 tweets
Nov 19, 2020
We've been doing a lot of interviewing interviewing at @HinterlandGames lately and here are some general thoughts/observations that may or may not be useful to anyone who is currently looking for a job.
Some of this may be specific to our approach, but I suspect much of it would apply generally no matter which studio you are applying at.
There's a lot of verbiage available in the wider-spread tech industry about how you are interviewing a company as much as they are interviewing you, and that companies need to prove to candidates why they should join them.
Read 32 tweets
Mar 1, 2020
Sorry to those who are disappointed you can no longer play #thelongdark on GeForce Now. Nvidia didn't ask for our permission to put the game on the platform so we asked them to remove it. Please take your complaints to them, not us. Devs should control where their games exist.
They offered us a free graphics card as an apology, so maybe they'll offer you the same thing.
There's really nothing newsworthy or shocking about our decision here. The shocking part is people's reactions to it. Nvidia admitted they made a mistake releasing without our permission, apologized, asked us if we'd like to stay on the platform, and we said "not at the moment".
Read 8 tweets

Did Thread Reader help you today?

Support us! We are indie developers!


This site is made by just two indie developers on a laptop doing marketing, support and development! Read more about the story.

Become a Premium Member ($3/month or $30/year) and get exclusive features!

Become Premium

Too expensive? Make a small donation by buying us coffee ($5) or help with server cost ($10)

Donate via Paypal

Or Donate anonymously using crypto!

Ethereum

0xfe58350B80634f60Fa6Dc149a72b4DFbc17D341E copy

Bitcoin

3ATGMxNzCUFzxpMCHL5sWSt4DVtS8UqXpi copy

Thank you for your support!

Follow Us on Twitter!

:(