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Thread by @vabelle2010: "The NY Times did an article a while back about the lack of female agents in the higher ranks. Of the bureau’s 13,523 agents over all, 2,683, […]"

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The NY Times did an article a while back about the lack of female agents in the higher ranks. Of the bureau’s 13,523 agents over all, 2,683, or about 20 percent, are women.“There is a lack of women in leadership roles.”
“The big challenge we’ve been confronting over the last 2 years is, how do we get women & people of color” to join the F.B.I., Mr. Comey said last Sunday at a conference of police chiefs in San Diego. “That’s been our big trouble, & I’ve described it as a crisis.”
Comey needed to look at retention; not recruitment. How many women and people of color resign from the FBI. How many of these people file EEOs. Senator Grassley brought up the female whistleblowers & Comey refused to meet with us.
Now Wray has this obligation to the American people. F.B.I. officials say they cannot explain completely the step backward for women in leadership roles at the bureau, but they say retirements & the timing of openings are partly responsible.
This is bullshit. Look at the EEO complaints, resignations of women and ask those who don’t go into management why they don’t.
At the F.B.I., there have been many challenges for women. Female agents have repeatedly sued the F.B.I. for sexual harassment & discrimination.
This year, a former agent accused her male co-workers in the Denver office of behaving inappropriately & making disparaging comments. According to the lawsuit, a male agent was overheard talking about a female colleague: “I hope she quits. She can stay home in the kitchen.”
When I became an FBI special Agent in 1997, i said never fathomed that my career as a top counterterrorism agent would end due to sexual discrimination, and even worse leave me working for two years selling "blush and lipstick" at a Macy's make-up counter.
But that, of course, is exactly what happened.
Numerical articles have been done on my experience and I want to ensure the information is explain, when needed. So when I speak in the first person rather than from the view of the journalist, you will understand.
Gritz, who graduated from the FBI in 1997, investigated some of the world's most notorious terrorists and national security threats. In 2012 after she said she was harassed and her career threatened by senior FBI officials she filed an EEOC complaint for sexual discrimination.
Her case is still pending six years later...
Wray, she says, needs to access the number of current Equal Employment Opportunity Complaints being brought forth by FBI agents & look at "culture & retention."
She believes if the new director does this, he will see a pattern of cultural deterioration brought by some of the bureau's leaders.
"Stop looking at your recruitment. There are thousands & thousands of people that want to be FBI agents.Take a look at what some of the corporations have done out there, how they have embraced diversity, how they have changed their culture.
Take a good look at why women in the FBI are not moving up. They're saying there's a lack of candidates for higher positions and higher ranks. Ask why? “
It’s the culture of how females are treated. It’s not about recruitment but when women get up to GS14 & GS15 positions then a good majority of us become a target.”
In Gritz's 15th year with the bureau, the then GS-15 who was at the time detailed to the CIA, said she ended up in a battle for her job when she confronted leaders in the FBI & management, who she claimed were going after her & a African American coworker.
Both her & her African American coworker had been in the bureau for more than 15 years each.
In a complaint filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Commission, Gritz, 6 years later, is still pursuing in court.
she wrote FBI leaders treated her African American coworker "extremely disrespectfully, undermined his position & tried to get him out of the section as well.”
“They wanted the black male and the female out, we were the only two they were going after,” said Gritz, referring to the colleague she defended during her last year.
Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, who led the Defense Intelligence Agency, worked closely with Gritz to find terrorists overseas. He says it's a shame the FBI let go of someone with years of top national security experience.
"She was one of the really, to me, bright lights & shining stars early on that just kinda got it when it came to the kind of enemy that we were facing & the relationship that was necessary between law enforcement & the military
& I just thought she was really a real pro," Flynn says.
The Justice OIG noted in a 2005 review of FBI detailees working in the CTC's Bin Laden Unit, that the bureau "lacked clear guidance on the role & responsibilities of FBI detailees," which "led to inconsistent expectations about what they were supposed to be doing at the CTC."
"The Joint Duty detailee is significant because it came out of the intelligence failures of 9/11," said Gritz. "There were detailees at the CIA from the FBI who didn’t know who they reported to, who didn’t know what their responsibilities were for reporting and to rectify that.
That’s why the Office of Director at the National Intelligence came out with policies & guidelines that governed all these questions about detailees."
In 2015, Senator Patrick Toomey, a Republican from Gritz’s then home state of Pennsylvania sent an inquiry on Gritz’s behalf to the Office of Professional Responsibility [OPR] to inquire about the OPR claims against Gritz.
In the letter sent to Toomey & forwarded to the FBI, I laid out 24 policies and laws broken in my case alone, paying specific attention to the Joint Duty Detailee policies. The FBI did not address these, instead, AD Candice Will responded...
that I “voluntarily forfeited the opportunity to challenge the findings and conclusions set forth in the OPR's proposal letter."
Again, no mention of the laws & policies violated.
In Will's letter the FBI states, Gritz (1)"repeatedly failed to attend daily meetings after being directed to do so: This charge stems from an invalid order.
As per ODNI Memorandums & Guidance on Joint Duty Detailees, I was to attend the gaining agency meetings & my time, tasking, travel, etc., was directed by the gaining agency, the CIA.
I had discussed with my SES, in March 2012, that it was necessary for me to tailor my schedule to the needs of my department at the CIA. I notified him that if he had questions, he could get more answers from my CIA direct supervisor.
My SES boss (FBI) stated it was ok if I was not at all of the 7am meetings. I told my FBI SES that when I could operationally make it to the meetings, I would attend. I attended approximately 60% of the meetings when I was not traveling.
My FBI SES boss never coordinated with my direct CIA supervisor & by saying this meeting never took place. However, I saved the message I sent to another detailee telling him about my meeting with the FBI SES.
I also have emails between him & another male agent, my GS15 counterpart, discussing what they could get on me. One stated he was having a friend doing an offline OPR on me & would have a solid opinion by the end of the day.
One told the other they could throw time & attendance at me, the other responded with “Just stick with the plan.”
(2) engaged in time & attendance fraud:
The 9 hour time difference between South Asia, Yemen, Somalia & Washington D.C. would make for long nights for Gritz during her time at the CIA. Like many FBI agents working with overseas sources she would wait for calls on her blackberry
& many times it would be 1 a.m. or 2 p.m. on the East Coast. It was different being a detailee.
"You're working terrorism. You're working long hours. You're not only working in the office," she said. OPR did not accept the proof of my working outside the office.
OPR did not accept the numerous Top Secret emails I produced showing I was still in a government building when their records showed I was not. There was no way I could send these from home; I had to be in an FBI or CIA.
I regularly took phone calls throughout the night. That was not an exception, it was the norm.
FBI Agents get Availability Pay, due to the Law Enforcement Availability Pay Act. You have to be available 24/7. I was known by many people I worked with to be available 24/7. FBI OPR regularly violates the Law Enforcement Availability Pay Act among numerous other policies & laws
(3) sent an unprofessional e-mail to another government official," among several other complaints:
What other complaints? Isn’t this setting them up for my Affirmative Defense if they used “other complaints” to make their decision?
The email to another government official was a Yahoo to Hotmail email, personal & not on FBI systems. It was a personal to personal email.
Further, it was addressing that the other person had lied & I found out was an alleged adulterer. (I guess now we see the FBI is ok with adultery-Page & Strzok).
Also, this individual lied in his first statement to the FBI. He stated there was no relationship and he didn’t know why I was upset. After I showed the FBI numerous e-mails & text messages, which would be totally inappropriate to send to just another government official....
the FBI allowed the individual to change his statement. Does this sound familiar? It should when we look at McCabe allegedly having agents modify/change their interview 302’s in the recent years.
Six years later, I still wait for a judge to rule on one motion, filed 2 years ago. I also wait for someone to do the right thing @FBI @TheJusticeDept @JusticeOIG
I continue to hear from current agents/analysts, stories similar to mine. Many are employees working counterterrorism or counterintelligence. Note, these divisions are the strongholds of McCabe, Ghattas, Priestap, & Strzok.
How much does the elimination of personnel with 15+ years experience in national security matters affect the national security of our country? I would say plenty.
I can count 16 former agents or analysts, with at least 15 years apiece, I have spoken with in the last 2 days.  That is a total of 240 years of national security experience in just this group alone.
Many more are out there. OIG needs to look at who were pushed out by whom. It’s actually alarming.
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