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Stephanie Hurlburt @sehurlburt
, 14 tweets, 3 min read Read on Twitter
I did a negotiation breakdown for someone today and I thought it might help y’all.

So let’s do this:
So, the scenario:

They got a coder job fresh out of school at a small-ish company that didn’t pay too well. After almost a year, they realized they could do better at other places and no promotions were in sight. Time to move jobs.
They get 2 offers. Big corp & well funded startup. They negotiate with big corp first. They throw out $X, much higher than current salary. Big corp accepts happily. They go to the startup and say that’s what they were offered at big corp. Startup offers $X. They accept the offer.
But then they realized peers with similar experience are making much more. In fact they feel quite undervalued, but promotions/raises are resisted heavily. They should be making more at this level at this place. Where did they go wrong?

My breakdown/analysis:
Since big company accepted so happily and they already had good experience, big company wasn’t really sure where they may be at and all signs point to the fact that they considered them mid level. But then they heard $X— that’s on the slight upper end of what they pay new grads.
Well of course big corp won’t say no to spending less money.

Then the startup is told that was their offer, knows ranges at big corp, so they now think the value of their candidate is junior dev level, plummeting from what the first impression was. Maybe they’re not that good!
Now all the work they produce is automatically assumed to be a lower level, they have that clear bias, and it’s hard to raise the prices and set a new perceived value.

Well, crap. That’s no good.

My advice:
My advice:
- Work on your public perceived value. Don’t talk about college, don’t talk about dates, just talk about what you know. You CAN have income grow very fast.
- Talk to others about what they make, gather many data points. This is more effective than any negotiation tip because it builds an inherent confidence.
- But keep in mind many are underpaid or don’t negotiate well or have low perceived values— you want data points from folks who do know how to negotiate and are valued highly. May be outside of your network, so go network!
- Once you set a value, once people have that bias in their minds, it’s hard to reset. You may need to jump places. Don’t tell the new place what you make now.
- Perceived value is a marketing skill. Marketing skills make you money. Learn them.
- I put all my advice on how to network here: stripe.com/atlas/guides/n…

Go forth and make more money, friends. 💛
Oh, and this thread about B2B pricing can also apply to salary.

If you take one thing away from this, take away the lesson that value is NOT an objective thing. Even if they see your work every day!

Value is *perceived* and perception is fuzzy & biased. We are human.

Business people have jobs for a reason & I want you to learn those skills
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