Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #Abbasid

Most recents (7)

1/ Fun fact from today’s Islamic History lecture @UniofOxford: the Khazars, a nomadic people from the S. Russian steppe, converted to #Judaism in ca. 9th. Here, a Khazar coin based on an Islamic model swaps “#Muhammad is the Messenger of God” for “#Moses is the Messenger of God”!
2/ Specifically, the Khazar king and his court are said to have converted. This model of top-down religious change happened all over the late antique and medieval worlds, but is most commonly associated with #Christianity and #Islam (not #Judaism!)
3/ The other great example of state conversion to #Judaism is the kingdom of Himyar in S. Arabia. The conversion was so thorough that after 380, pagan inscriptions disappear, replaced by inscriptions with Hebrew/Aramaic words (shalom, amen, kanisat) & names (Isaac, Judah, Joseph)
Read 7 tweets
I decided to rewrite the thread on the Seal of Muḥammad to focus on the seal itself, and not the seal as part of the black shahāda flag, on which I have a proper thread. First of all, let's start with the actual design of the #seal on the #prophet's signet ring.
The most common and popular reading of the engraving today is "Allāh Rasūl Muḥammad", an #Arabic linguistic construction which places the subject after the object similar to the famous verse in the Qur'anic Fāṭir: 28: "Innamā yakhshā Allāha min ʿibādihi al-ʿulamāʾu."
Supporters of this theory argue that one should always position #God's divine name(s) in a superior position when writing a text, as did the prophet do when writing his letters. They state that only the top position befits the Divine Being, therefore starting with Allāh.
Read 21 tweets
Something special today. I found some old notes on the different theological schools existent within Sunni #Islam. Since there's a lot of confusion on this matter, I'll share them with you guys. It's a very brief and very simplified description, so nothing complex really.
There are three main ways to approach the Islamic creed (ʿaqīda):
1) Through literalist textualism
2) Through the bāṭin (inner esoteric meanings)
3) Through speculative rationalism

It's important to note that these three ways mostly coexisted within the Islamic world.
The 1st is used by the school of al-athariyya (from #Arabic أثر - tradition/transmission). They approach the #Islamic creed through a literary reading of the relevatory texts, focusing on its ẓāhir (apparent) meaning. The texts are the sole authorities in matters of belief/law.
Read 11 tweets
A short [THREAD] on the symbolism of some of the #IS media, most notably Dābiq and al-Aʿmāq. Might be a bit late, but this is indispensable for an account like mine, and offers a great view on the use of eschatological imagery by such groups.
All throughout #history, #Muslim groups on the rise tried to intertwine their cause with the prophetic eschatological narrations on the ultimate victory of the righteous group (al-ṭāʾifa al-manṣūra) who precede the coming of the Mehdī and the Messias.
A most notable example is the recurring interpretation of the black banners from the East as a sign of the victorious army, more specifically by the #Abbasid revolutionaries and modern-day armed Muslim groups. Dābiq and al-Aʿmāq belong in that same line of thought.
Read 10 tweets
Like announced, I'll start a thread on the symbolism of the (in)famous black & white banner in #Islam. This comprehensive thread will explore its historical origins and cover a list of its contemporary users from a neutral #academic point of view. Not for the faint of heart. 😄
As a political leader & head of a growing religious community, the #prophet Muḥammad used to fly a banner (liwāʾ) and a flag (rāya). The difference? According to the #dictionary, a banner is "a long piece of cloth" while a flag is "a piece of cloth that represents a group."
The Companion Ibn al-ʿArabī was quoted in Fatḥ al-Bārī (6/147) as saying: "A banner is what is tied to the side of a spear to rally around, while a flag is that which is planted and left to be waved by the wind."
Read 77 tweets
Alright, so the esteemed @ArmoryBazaar posted some pictures of coins found in Idlib - Syria. I would like to make a thread out of this, for future coins. I will post my take on these coins, but I'm very much interested in other opinions.
The two small copper coins (picture 2 & 3) are in my opinion #Umayyad copper fals. The inscription features Islamic texts, most definitely the Islamic shahada. That indicates they're from the later Umayyad period. I would say 8th century.
It's really possible that the last coin is much older that the other coins. It still features a cross and human imagery, indicating Byzantine influences. This kind of coins were used in early Umayyad times, when the caliphs still imitated #Byzantine en #Persian coinage.
Read 70 tweets
These Moroccan coins feature the so-called Seal of Solomon, often depicted as a hexagram, similar to the Star of David. The coins are dated respectively 1271 A.H. (1855) and 1290 A.H. (1873/4), minted by king 'Abd al-Raḥmān and his successor, Muḥammad IV of #Morocco.
The Seal of Solomon is the signet ring attributed to the Abrahamic king/prophet Solomon. It is said that Solomon used this ring to control the spirits and animals. The design as a hexagram is often depicted on medieval #Islamic banners, coins, drinking-cups or in mosques.
According to the Catalan Atlas (1375), the two Anatolian beyliks of respectively Karaman and Candar featured a Seal of Solomon on their flags. The symbol was popular among the Turkish beyliks, and was later used by the #Ottomans in their mosque decorations.
Read 70 tweets

Related hashtags

Did Thread Reader help you today?

Support us! We are indie developers!


This site is made by just two indie developers on a laptop doing marketing, support and development! Read more about the story.

Become a Premium Member ($3.00/month or $30.00/year) and get exclusive features!

Become Premium

Too expensive? Make a small donation by buying us coffee ($5) or help with server cost ($10)

Donate via Paypal Become our Patreon

Thank you for your support!