Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #Classical

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Thread: The Mausoleum of Diocletian, constructed during the Emperor’s lifetime to house his remains after death; strategically placed at the heart of his palace-fortress in Split, Croatia, c.305 AD. #Roman #archaeology #architecture #Croatia
The first emperor to voluntarily abdicate the throne, Diocletian enjoyed a short but peaceful retirement at his purpose-built palace where he famously tended to his vegetable gardens. He died in 311 and was laid to rest in an elaborate porphyry sarcophagus in his great mausoleum.
The Emperor's remains were desecrated during invasions of the 7th century and his sarcophagus destroyed. Ironically, considering Diocletian's Christian persecutions, his mausoleum was consecrated as a Cathedral in 653; with an exquisite Romanesque style bell tower added in 1100.
Read 16 tweets
John Maynard #Keynes was born on June 5, 1883, and died too early. Here's a few thoughts on why I keep circling back to him, & why his work forces 2 rethink the way we do & teach #economics, esp. #micro. I am sure this (partial) thread will upset someone: apologies in advance. 1/
#Keynes understood that #macroeconomics is about emergent properties: aggregate outcomes that don't make sense 2 the individuals populating the economy. The logic, e.g., of the #IncomeExpenditure model is that an economy can coordinate along any point on the 45-degree line.. 2/
and that, accordingly, we should expect economies to operate with slack. Then you have the #ParadoxofThrift and all that. He also talked about the #ParadoxofCosts when he discusses redistribution to lower income people who have higher propensity to consume... 3/
Read 14 tweets
“My name is here presented more to be understood than to be read” said once a #Roman senator.
For my #EarlyMedievalPills, let’s explore what monograms can tell us about changes in political culture & social communication between late antiquity & #Carolingian times.
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Monogrammatic culture has its roots in the #classical world. Producers used monograms to mark mass-produced objects such as pottery. We also see them on Hellenistic coins. However, they didn’t encode the name of the issuing authority, but functioned as control marks.
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Influenced by Hellenistic models, #Roman emperors adopted monograms on their coins. They were used to encode the emperor’s name thus becoming personal graphic devices that could also mark certain objects the trade of which was an imperial monopoly.
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Read 30 tweets

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