Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #HTAFC

Most recents (15)

A previous thread explained the differences between a football club’s profit and loss account and its cash flow statement, as it is important to understand where the money has been spent. This thread will look at how this works for each of the 20 Premier League clubs in 2017/18.
#AFC went from £52m operating profit to £42m operating loss, due to lower revenue after failing to qualify for the Champions League, compounded by higher wages and player amortisation plus Wenger pay-off. However, £120m profit on player sales resulted in £70m profit before tax.
#AFC cash flow boosted by favourable £58m movement in working capital (increase in creditors). Spent £29m (net) on players (purchases £110m, sales £81m). Paid £20m for Emirates loan (£11m interest & £9m debt) plus £12m tax. Net cash inflow of £51m was highest in Premier League.
Read 42 tweets
One of the questions most frequently asked by football fans is “Where’s all the money gone?” The answer is only partly found in a club’s profit and loss account, so we need to also look at the cash flow statement to get the full picture. Some thoughts in the following thread.
A club’s profit and loss account is easy to understand, as it is basically revenue less expenses (mainly player wages), but this is an accounting profit based on the accruals concept, which can be very different from actual cash movements.
This is important, as the main reason that football clubs fail is cash flow problems. It does not matter how large your revenue is (or your profits are), if you do not have the cash to pay your players, suppliers or indeed the taxman, then you will find yourself in trouble.
Read 39 tweets
As the 2018/19 Premier League season approaches, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the impact of the new three-year TV deal on clubs’ revenue, particularly the changes in the distribution system for the overseas TV deals. Some thoughts in the following thread.
As a reminder, in 2018/19 each club received equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34m, overseas TV £43m and commercial income £5m. Each league position was worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live was worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
Therefore, each club received a total of £82m from equal payments with the only differences in Premier League TV distribution due to: (a) league position, ranging from #MCFC £38m to #HTAFC £2m; (b) live TV games, from #LFC £33m to £12m for #AFCB, #HTAFC, #SaintsFC and Watford.
Read 26 tweets
Although Derby County’s fans will be bitterly disappointed after losing to Aston Villa in the 2018/19 Championship play-off final, it might still be worth looking at their 2017/18 accounts to show how the club is trying to meet its financial challenges. Some thoughts follow #DCFC
#DCFC went from a £7.9m loss to £14.6m profit, mainly due to £40m from selling & leasing back Pride Park Stadium. Revenue was only up £0.6m (2%) to £29.6m, though this was the club’s highest in the Championship without parachute payments. Profit on player sales fell £12m to £4m.
Main reason for #DCFC revenue increase was an away FA Cup game at Manchester United, which meant match receipts were up £0.5m (5%) to £9.1m. Broadcasting also rose £0.2m (2%) to £8.1m, due to higher Premier League solidarity payment, but commercial was down £0.1m to £12.4m.
Read 46 tweets
With Aston Villa and Derby County facing each other in today’s Championship play-off final for promotion to the Premier League, let’s take a closer look at what has been described as the most lucrative match in world football. Some thoughts in the following thread #AVFC #DCFC
The Championship play-off winners will receive nearly £180m TV money over the next 3 seasons: at least £97m from the Premier League in 2019/20 (based on 20th place), then £78m parachute payments (2 years if relegated after one season in the PL) plus £5m EFL distribution.
The losers of the Championship play-off will receive around £20m over next 3 seasons: £13.5m Premier League solidarity payments (£4.5m a year) plus £6.9m EFL central distribution (£2.3m a year). So the difference between winning and losing this match is £160m (£180m less £20m).
Read 15 tweets
The Premier League has published its TV revenue for the 2018/19 season, ranging from £97m for #HTAFC to £152m for #LFC, who earned more than league winners #MCFC £151m, due to more matches broadcast live. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Each club receives equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34.4m, overseas TV £43.2m and commercial income £5.0m. Each league position is worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live is worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
#LFC Premier League TV money increased by £6.5m from £145.9m to £152.4m in 2018/19, due to a £3.6m higher merit payment (for finishing 2nd, compared to 4th the previous season) and £2.4m more from overseas TV deals. Benefited from most live TV games: 29 vs. #MCFC 26.
Read 14 tweets
Swansea City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a “difficult” season when they finished 18th, so were relegated to the Championship after 7 consecutive years in the Premier League. They had 3 managers: Paul Clement, Carlos Carvahal and Graham Potter. Some thoughts follow #Swans
#Swans made a loss before tax of £3.2m, compared to a prior year profit of £13.4m, representing a £16.6m deterioration, as revenue fell £1m from £128m to £127m, though profit on player sales was up £9m to £46m. After tax, the club went from a £13.0m profit to a £2.9m loss.
#Swans £1m revenue fall was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £4.7m (4%) decrease from £109.4m to £104.7m, due to less prize money for a lower league position. In contrast, commercial rose £3.8m (35%) from £10.7m to £14.5m, while match day was flat at £7.4m.
Read 44 tweets
Newcastle United’s 2017/18 financial results reflect their promotion after a single season in the Championship. Managing director Lee Charnley said, “A 10th placed finish in our first season back in the Premier League was a fantastic achievement.” Some thoughts follow #nufc
#NUFC promotion brought the club back to “a healthy financial position”, moving from £47m loss before tax to £23m profit, as revenue more than doubled from £86m to a record £178m and no repeat of prior year £32m exceptional costs: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts.
#NUFC £93m revenue growth very largely driven by broadcasting’s £79m increase to £126m, reflecting vastly higher TV money in the Premier League, while commercial also increased £13m (90%) to £28m, but match day flat at £24m. However, profit on player sales dropped £39m to £4m.
Read 48 tweets
Huddersfield Town banter season - a thread:

#htafc
Pre season, changing the badge on our kits from our club badge to this monstrosity... #htafc
Having our pitch ruined by @LittleMix which wasn’t fixed before our first Premier League game of the season v Chelsea #htafc
Read 18 tweets
I published a study last week on where Premier League clubs source their money and what they spend it on by reviewing the clubs’ cash flow statements over the last decade. Today I do a similar exercise on Championship clubs – where the picture is very different.
In the 10 years between 2008 and 2017 Championship clubs had over £2.8 bln of available cash with the vast majority of financing £2.5 bln coming from their owners (loans £1.9bln and shares £0.6 bln)
So an incredible 87% of Championship clubs’ cash came from owner financing with just 7% from operating activities. This is in stark contrast to the Premier League with 54% from operations and 42% from owners. There was also £41m from (net) player sales & £45m from bank balances.
Read 22 tweets
THREAD: 🏴 #PremierLeague strength of schedule breakdown 📊

We rank each side on how many points they can expect to pick up from the next six games using our xG model 👇
1. #ManCity – 14.3 xPoints
City will face sides with an average position of just above midtable over the next six games, looking at average of 2.38 xPoints per game.

#MCFC @City_Watch @City_Chief @SuperbiaProeIia @PicturedCity @City_Xtra @9320pod 👇
2. #LFC – 13.2 xPoints
Liverpool look set to continue their good start to the season. Despite facing #MUFC, we make the Reds’ trip to #WatfordFC their hardest fixture.

@AnfieldEdition @AnfieldHQ @TheRedmenTV @LFCData @anfieldonline @BassTunedToRed 👇
Read 21 tweets
This is unprecedented even for me. Currently lying 8th in the Premier League with #HTAFC at the end of OCTOBER having scored just 4 goals. Through to the 5th round of the League Cup having not scored a goal. #Deeeeeefence #BrickWall #FM18 #FMM18
It’s now December and we’re still the lowest scorers in the league (12) but a string of great results and more clean sheets takes us into the European places.
I'm not entirely sure what's happening. I'm Huddersfield fucking Town & I'm lying 6th in the Premier League in Feb 2020 having only scored 18 goals & conceding just 9. With 40 points in the bag I've likely secured my PL safety, now for the charge to Europe. #FM18 #FootballManager
Read 19 tweets
Although the 2016/17 financial results for the Championship are now a season out-of-date, they are the most recent published by the clubs, so people might still be interested in the comparisons as the new season kicks-off. Some thoughts in the following thread.
In contrast to the Premier League, only 6 clubs in the Championship made money, led by #NFFC £32m & #BarnsleyFC £13m. In this very competitive division most clubs over-extend in a bid to reach the lucrative top flight. Largest losses at 2 promoted clubs: #NUFC £47m & #BHAFC £39m.
Some clubs’ figures impacted by significant exceptional items, so #NFFC (£40m) and #ReadingFC (£9m) were boosted by loan write-offs. In contrast, promotion bonuses adversely affected #HTAFC £12m, #NUFC £10m and #BHAFC £9m. Newcastle also booked £22m onerous contract provisions.
Read 26 tweets
Blackburn Rovers’ financial results for 2016/17 covered “a season to forget for #Rovers fans”, as the club was relegated from the Championship to League One with manager Owen Coyle replaced by Tony Mowbray. The good news is that they have immediately bounced back in 2017/18.
#Rovers loss worsened by £2.3m from £1.5m to £3.8m, mainly due to £7.1m (32%) reduction in revenue to £14.9m and £6.0m fall in profit on player sales to £10.4m, offset by cost cuts: wages £3.4m (13%) to £22.0m, other expenses £4.8m (51%) to £4.5m & player amortisation £1.8m.
Main reason for what #Rovers Finance Director Mike Cheston described as “a significant drop in income” was the loss of parachute payments £10.5m, though the blow was softened by £4.3m solidarity payments. Match day and commercial slightly declined, by £0.2m & £0.1m respectively.
Read 35 tweets
Newcastle United recently published financial results for the 2016/17 season, when they won the Championship to secure immediate promotion back to the Premier League after relegation from the top flight in 2015/16. Some thoughts in the following thread #NUFC
#NUFC relegation “had a huge impact on the club’s financial results”, moving from pre-tax £4.2m profit to £46.7m loss, as revenue dropped by almost a third from £126m to £86m, though loss inflated by £32m exceptional items: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts provision.
Main reason for #NUFC £40m revenue decrease was £25m reduction in broadcasting, due to lower TV money in Championship, though commercial and match day also fell £13.6m and £1.3m respectively. Largely offset by £39m increase in profit on player sales from £3m to £42m.
Read 44 tweets

Related hashtags

Did Thread Reader help you today?

Support us! We are indie developers!


This site is made by just three indie developers on a laptop doing marketing, support and development! Read more about the story.

Become a Premium Member ($3.00/month or $30.00/year) and get exclusive features!

Become Premium

Too expensive? Make a small donation by buying us coffee ($5) or help with server cost ($10)

Donate via Paypal Become our Patreon

Thank you for your support!