Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #WHUFC

Most recents (19)

Borussia Dortmund 2018/19 accounts cover their first season with Lucien Favre as manager when they finished second behind Bayern Munich in the Bundesliga and reached the Champions League last 16. Some thoughts in the following thread #BVB
#BVB profit before tax decreased €13m from €35m to €22m (profit after tax €17m), despite revenue rising €60m (19%) from €317m to €377m, as profit on player sales fell €49m from €126m to €77m and total expenses were up €26m, but net interest payable was €3m lower.
All #BVB revenue streams increased, though the largest growth by far was in broadcasting, up €45m (37%) to €167m. In addition, commercial rose €9m (6%) to €157m, match operations €2m (6%) to €45m and other operating income €4m to €8m.
Read 40 tweets
A previous thread explained the differences between a football club’s profit and loss account and its cash flow statement, as it is important to understand where the money has been spent. This thread will look at how this works for each of the 20 Premier League clubs in 2017/18.
#AFC went from £52m operating profit to £42m operating loss, due to lower revenue after failing to qualify for the Champions League, compounded by higher wages and player amortisation plus Wenger pay-off. However, £120m profit on player sales resulted in £70m profit before tax.
#AFC cash flow boosted by favourable £58m movement in working capital (increase in creditors). Spent £29m (net) on players (purchases £110m, sales £81m). Paid £20m for Emirates loan (£11m interest & £9m debt) plus £12m tax. Net cash inflow of £51m was highest in Premier League.
Read 42 tweets
One of the questions most frequently asked by football fans is “Where’s all the money gone?” The answer is only partly found in a club’s profit and loss account, so we need to also look at the cash flow statement to get the full picture. Some thoughts in the following thread.
A club’s profit and loss account is easy to understand, as it is basically revenue less expenses (mainly player wages), but this is an accounting profit based on the accruals concept, which can be very different from actual cash movements.
This is important, as the main reason that football clubs fail is cash flow problems. It does not matter how large your revenue is (or your profits are), if you do not have the cash to pay your players, suppliers or indeed the taxman, then you will find yourself in trouble.
Read 39 tweets
We get every Premier League player to sit down on camera and say how they want their name pronounced - and there’s LOADS I did wrong. So here’s a thread so you don’t make the same mistakes I did!
First of all - Norwich City’s Teemu Pukki. His first name is actually pronounced ‘TAY-mu’ #ncfc
How about Chelsea’s #USMNT star Christian Pulisic? His surname is ‘puh-LISS-ick’, no Eastern European style ‘itch’ on the end #CFC
Read 11 tweets
There is much talk about the so-called “Big Six” pulling away from the rest of the Premier League financially, but is this actually true? This thread looks at this question from the perspective of revenue, wages and total player costs #AFC #CFC #LFC #MCFC #MUFC #THFC
For the purpose of this analysis, we will take the 7th highest club in terms of revenue and wages for each season between 2010 and 2018. This means that the 7th placed club is not always the same. For example, for the last 4 seasons’ revenue this was #EFC, #LCFC, #WHUFC & #NUFC.
The highest revenue in the 2018 Premier League was #MUFC £590m, followed by #MCFC £503m, #LFC £455m, #CFC £448m, #AFC £389m, #THFC £379m and #EFC £189m. The highest growth since 2010 came at #MCFC with £378m (or 300%).
Read 20 tweets
Newcastle United’s 2017/18 financial results reflect their promotion after a single season in the Championship. Managing director Lee Charnley said, “A 10th placed finish in our first season back in the Premier League was a fantastic achievement.” Some thoughts follow #nufc
#NUFC promotion brought the club back to “a healthy financial position”, moving from £47m loss before tax to £23m profit, as revenue more than doubled from £86m to a record £178m and no repeat of prior year £32m exceptional costs: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts.
#NUFC £93m revenue growth very largely driven by broadcasting’s £79m increase to £126m, reflecting vastly higher TV money in the Premier League, while commercial also increased £13m (90%) to £28m, but match day flat at £24m. However, profit on player sales dropped £39m to £4m.
Read 48 tweets
Leicester City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 9th in the Premier League and reached the quarter-finals in both domestic cups. Claude Puel replaced Craig Shakespeare as manager in October. Some thoughts in the following thread #LCFC
#LCFC profit before tax significantly decreased from a record £92m to £2m (profit after tax down from £80m to £1m), as revenue fell by around a third (£74m) from £233m to £159m, because there was no repeat of the unprecedented 2016/17 Champions League participation.
The #LCFC revenue decline was driven by broadcasting income’s £67m (35%) decrease to £124m, mainly due to £70m from the Champions League in the prior season. For much the same reason, gate receipts fell £4m (22%) to £13m, while commercial income was also £4m (15%) lower at £22m.
Read 39 tweets
Liverpool’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 4th in the Premier League and returned to European competition with a bang by reaching the Champions League final, where they were defeated by Real Madrid. Some thoughts in the following thread #LFC
#LFC profit before tax increased from £40m to £125m, as profit on player sales surged £86m to £124m and the impressive Champions League run helped drive revenue up £91m (25%) to a record £455m. Profit after tax improved from £39m to £106m.
All three #LFC revenue streams increased: broadcasting was a substantial £66m (43%) higher at £220m, due to Champions League participation; match day climbed £7m (10%) to £81m, while commercial rose £18m (13%) to £154m, also largely linked to European success.
Read 47 tweets
Deloitte have published the 22nd edition of their annual Football Money League, which ranks the world’s leading football clubs by revenue, this time covering the 2017/18 season. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Real Madrid £665m reclaimed top spot, while Barcelona £612m made it a Spanish “one-two” – the first clubs to break the £600m barrier. #MUFC £590m fell to 3rd, having been 1st last year. Bayern Munich £557m and #MCFC £503m retained 4th & 5th places, while PSG £480m were up to 6th.
There are no fewer than six English clubs in the top ten, including #LFC £455m, #CFC £448m, #AFC £389m and #THFC £379m (overtaking Juventus). Roma, Milan and #NUFC were new entrants to the top 20, replacing #LCFC, #SaintsFC and Napoli.
Read 31 tweets
Arsenal’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 6th in the Premier League, while reaching the Europa League semi-finals. Manager Arsène Wenger was replaced by Unai Emery, while Stan Kroenke took full ownership. Some thoughts in the following thread #AFC
#AFC profit before tax increased from £45m to £70m, despite revenue falling £35m (8%) to £388m, mainly due to participating in Europa League rather than more lucrative Champions League, as profit on player sales surged £113m to £120m. Profit after tax improved from £35m to £57m.
All #AFC revenue streams decreased: broadcasting was £19m (9%) lower at £180m, mainly due to lower Europa League distributions; commercial dropped £10m (9%) to £107m; match day declined £1m (1%) to £99m; while player loans fell £5m to £2m.
Read 47 tweets
Chelsea’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 5th in the Premier League, thus qualifying for the Europa League, and defeated #MUFC to win the FA Cup. Manager Antonio Conte replaced by Maurizio Sarri in July. Some thoughts in the following thread #CFC
#CFC profit before tax increased from £16m to £67m, as revenue rose by £82m (23%) to a record £433m, primarily due to the club’s return to European competition, and profit on player sales was up £44m to £113m. Profit after tax improved from £15m to £62m.
All #CFC revenue streams increased: broadcasting was £42m (26%) higher at £204m, due to Champions League; match day climbed £8m (13%) to £74m, largely for the same reason; while commercial rose £32m (24%) to £165m, mainly from the new Nike kit deal.
Read 43 tweets
West Ham’s 2017/18 financial results covered their second season at the new London Stadium, which the club described as “difficult”, despite finishing a “satisfactory” 13th in the Premier League, as managers Slaven Bilic and David Moyes both left. Some thoughts follow #WHUFC
#WHUFC profit before tax reduced by £25m from £43m to £18m, as revenue fell by £8m (4%) to £175m, though profit on player sales was up £2m to £30m. Despite the revenue decline, wages increased by £12m (12%) to £107m, but player amortisation dropped £4m (10%) to £41m.
All #WHUFC revenue streams decreased: match receipts were £4.1m (14%) lower at £24.5m, due to no Europa League; while commercial fell £3m (9%) to £32m, mainly due to one-offs in the previous year; and broadcasting was slightly lower at £119m, due to lower Premier League place.
Read 39 tweets
THREAD: 🏴 #PremierLeague strength of schedule breakdown 📊

We rank each side on how many points they can expect to pick up from the next six games using our xG model 👇
1. #ManCity – 14.3 xPoints
City will face sides with an average position of just above midtable over the next six games, looking at average of 2.38 xPoints per game.

#MCFC @City_Watch @City_Chief @SuperbiaProeIia @PicturedCity @City_Xtra @9320pod 👇
2. #LFC – 13.2 xPoints
Liverpool look set to continue their good start to the season. Despite facing #MUFC, we make the Reds’ trip to #WatfordFC their hardest fixture.

@AnfieldEdition @AnfieldHQ @TheRedmenTV @LFCData @anfieldonline @BassTunedToRed 👇
Read 21 tweets
Manchester United are the second Premier League club after #MCFC to publish 2017/18 financial results, covering a season when they were runners-up in the league and FA Cup, but were eliminated by Sevilla in the Champions League last 16. Some thoughts in the following thread #MUFC
#MUFC profit before tax down from £57m to £26m, mainly due to higher player costs, as wage bill shot up £32m and player amortisation rose £14m, while revenue only up £9m. Tax bill increased from £17m to £63m as a change in US corporate tax rate led to a £49m non-cash write-off.
#MUFC revenue only grew £9m (2%). Only meaningful increase was broadcasting, up £10m (5%) to £204m. Commercial income was basically flat at £276m, while match day dropped £2m (2%) to £110m. Profit on player sales rose £7m to £18m.
Read 39 tweets
Ten years after Sheikh Mansour acquired the club, Manchester City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they won the Premier League in some style, won the League Cup and reached the Champions League quarter-finals. Some thoughts in the following thread #MCFC
#MCFC profit before tax up from £0.1m (£1.1m after tax) to £10.4m, as previous season was adversely impacted by change in year-end resulting in an extra month’s costs with minimal revenue uplift. Revenue rose £27m (6%) to £500.5m, only second English club above £0.5 bln.
All #MCFC revenue streams up: commercial income rose £14m (7%) to £232m; broadcasting increased £8m (4%) to £212m; and match day was £5m (9%) higher at £57m. Profit on player sales was up £4m to £39m.
Read 37 tweets
Although the 2016/17 financial results for the Premier League are now a season out-of-date, they are still the most recent published by the clubs, so I thought some comparisons might be interesting as we head into the 2017/18 season. Thread follows.
Thanks to a combination of the PL TV deal and FFP wage controls, almost all clubs are now profitable with only #SAFC reporting a loss. #LCFC led the way with £92m profit before tax, the highest ever made in the Premier League, followed by #THFC £58m, #MUFC £57m and #AFC £45m.
Profit on player sales is an increasingly important element in driving the improved profitability of some Premier League clubs. In 2016/17 highest profits were made by Chelsea £69m (Oscar to Shanghai SIPG), Everton £52m (Stones to #MCFC) and Southampton £42m (Mané to #LFC).
Read 28 tweets
Tottenham Hotspur’s 2016/17 financial results covered the club’s last season at the old White Hart Lane, when they finished 2nd in the Premier League, played in the Champions League and reached the FA Cup semi-finals. Some thoughts in the following thread #THFC
#THFC profit before tax improved by £20m from £38m to £58m with revenue rising by 46% (£97m) to a record £306m and profit on player sales up £13m to £40m. Profit after tax “only” increased by £8m from £33m to £41m, as tax charge was £11m higher at £17m.
#THFC revenue growth was largely due to broadcasting rising £78m (71%) to £188m, driven by the new Premier League TV deal and Champions League bringing in twice as much as the Europa League. Commercial increased £14m (24%) to £73m, while match day was up £5m (11%) to £45m.
Read 42 tweets
Liverpool’s 2016/17 financial results included their highest ever revenue, despite not playing in Europe, though they finished 4th in the Premier League and reached the semi-finals of the EFL Cup. Some thoughts in the following thread #LFC
#LFC converted £20m loss before tax to £40m profit with revenue growing by 21% (£62m) to a record £364m, though profit on player sales was down £4m at £38m (mainly Christian Benteke, Jordon Ibe, Joe Allen & Martin Skrtel), as no repeat of Raheem Sterling’s big money sale to City.
#LFC revenue was driven by the new Premier League TV deal, though partly offset by no Europa League money, with a net increase in broadcasting income of £31m to £154m. The expanded Main Stand saw match day rise £11m to £74m, while commercial was up £21m to £136m.
Read 37 tweets
West Ham’s 2016/17 financial results covered their first season in the new London Stadium. Despite dropping to 11th place in the Premier League, they reported record revenue and profit. Some thoughts in the following thread #WHUFC
#WHUFC improved the bottom line by £48m, as they converted a £5m loss to £43m profit with revenue growing by 29% (£41m) to £183m. Profit on player sales was up £24m, mainly due to transfers of Dimitri Payet to Marseille and James Tomkins to Crystal Palace.
#WHUFC revenue growth was driven by the new Premier League TV deal with a net increase in broadcasting income of £33m (38%) to £119m. Commercial income also rose by £7m (25%) to £35m, while match receipts were £2m (6%) higher in the new stadium at £29m.
Read 33 tweets

Related hashtags

Did Thread Reader help you today?

Support us! We are indie developers!


This site is made by just three indie developers on a laptop doing marketing, support and development! Read more about the story.

Become a Premium Member ($3.00/month or $30.00/year) and get exclusive features!

Become Premium

Too expensive? Make a small donation by buying us coffee ($5) or help with server cost ($10)

Donate via Paypal Become our Patreon

Thank you for your support!