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Earlier this week I posted a thread on the 2018/19 financials for the Big Six Premier League clubs. Today I am going to look at the numbers for the Other 14 clubs #AFCB #BHAFC #BurnleyFC #CardiffCity #CPFC #EFC #FFC #HTAFC #LCFC #NUFC #SaintsFC #WatfordFC #WHUFC #WWFC
Obviously, there will be a significant impact on these numbers in the 2019/20 season (and probably 2020/21 as well) as a result of the COVID-19 lockdown, which has resulted in clubs earning much less revenue for a few months, but how did it look before the pandemic struck? ImageImage
Other 14 Premier League clubs generated £2.2 bln of revenue, but £2.6 bln of expenses (including £1.5 bln wages and £0.6 bln player amortisation) meant £393m operating loss. This was improved by £241m profit on player sales, offset by £35m interest, giving £188m loss before tax. Image
Read 35 tweets
Now that all the Premier League clubs have published their 2018/19 financials, we can compare the results, but we will do this a little differently by separating the analysis into two parts, as the numbers are so different for: (1) the Big Six clubs; and (2) the Other 14 clubs.
Today’s thread will focus on the 2018/19 financial results for the Big Six Premier League clubs #AFC #CFC #LFC #MCFC #MUFC #THFC. Clearly, there will be a significant impact on these numbers in 2019/20 following the COVID-19 lockdown, but how did it look before the pandemic?
Big 6 Premier League clubs generated £3.0 bln of revenue, but £3.1 bln of expenses (including £1.7 bln wages and £0.7 bln player amortisation) meant a £97m operating loss. This was improved by £193m profit on player sales, offset by £23m interest, giving £33m profit before tax.
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Newcastle United’s 2018/19 financial results cover a season when they finished 13th in the Premier League, 3 places lower than the previous year. Steve Bruce replaced Rafael Benitez as manager after the season ended. Some thoughts in the following thread #NUFC
#NUFC profit before tax improved by £18m from £23m to £41m, very largely due to profit on player sales surging from £4m to £25m, as revenue dropped £2m (1%) from £178m to £176m. There was minimal expense growth of just £1m. Post-tax profit increased from £19m to £35m.
The largest #NUFC revenue decrease was broadcasting, which fell £2.5m (2%) to £124m, mainly due to the worse finishing place in the league, though commercial was also down £0.5m (2%) to £28m. In contrast, match day rose £0.9m (4%) to £25m.
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Huddersfield Town - brace yourselves, we are drawing you ✍️

Suggestions needed please. 36 wonky Terriers to be doodled. Our attempt at Andy Booth shouldn't fill anybody with confidence.

RT's appreciated

P.S. we can't draw very well 💙🤍💙
Just horrible. Straight off the bad, a horrible, horrible picture.
Things have fallen apart in record time as for some reason we thought Andy Booth was Scottish for some reason so this entire endeavor is already ruined.
Read 33 tweets
I’ve prepared a few more of the financial fact sheets for selected football clubs. To be clear, this is not new information as such, but just a more succinct presentation of previous data. This thread covers #AVFC, #AFCB, #CardiffCity, #HTAFC, #NCFC, #SUFC, #WatfordFC and #WWFC.
#AVFC posted huge £69m net loss. Operating loss even higher at £115m, including £46m promotion payments, but £14m HS2 compensation. Offset by £36m stadium sale and £11m player sales. Revenue fall due to lower parachute payments. Debt-free after write-offs and equity conversion.
#AFCB lost money 2 years in a row, as revenue has fallen from £136m to £131m, while wage bill has grown from £72m to £111m. Little benefit from low player sales. Debt up to £100m, 9th highest in PL. Spent £150m on player purchases in last 2 years with transfer debt up to £81m.
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Sheffield United’s 2018/19 financial results covered a season when they finished second in the Championship, securing automatic promotion to mark a remarkable rise from League One to the Premier League in 3 years under Manager of the Year Chris Wilder. Some thoughts follow #SUFC
These accounts cover the final year of #SUFC co-ownership between Kevin McCabe and Prince Abdullah. Since then the High Court has ruled that McCabe must sell his 50% share to the Prince for £5m. As a result, the club will purchase the stadium and training facility for £43.5m.
#SUFC loss increased from £2m to £21m, reflecting the “exceptional cost of promotion to the Premier League”. Revenue rose 4% (£0.8m) to £21m, while profit on player sales was up £6m (69%) to £14m, but this was more than offset by £26m of cost growth.
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Burnley’s 2018/19 financial results covered a season when they finished 15th in the Premier League, securing a fourth consecutive season in the top flight, and competed in Europe for the first time in over 50 years. Some thoughts follow #BurnleyFC
#BurnleyFC profit before tax dropped from a club record £45m to £5m, mainly because profit on player sales fell £24m from £31m to £7m, though revenue was also slightly lower at £138m and expenses increased £15m. Profit after tax was down from £37m to £4m.
#BurnleyFC £1m (1%) revenue fall was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £7m (5%) decrease from £122m to £115m, due to lower prize money for finishing 15th (against 7th prior year). In contrast, commercial rose £4.6m (39%) to £16.5m and match day was up £0.7m (13%) to £6.3m.
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Huddersfield Town’s 2018/19 financial results accounts cover a season when they finished 20th in the Premier League, so were relegated after 2 years in the top flight. Manager David Wagner was replaced by Jan Siewert in January 2019. Some thoughts in the following thread #HTAFC
After these accounts closed, chairman Dean Hoyle sold a 75% controlling ownership stake to Pure Sports Consultancy Limited, a previous shirt sponsor, owned by lifelong #HTAFC fan Phil Hodgkinson. Danny Cowley was appointed manager in September, assisted by his brother Nicky.
#HTAFC profit before tax fell £26m from £30m to £4m, as revenue decreased £6m (5%) from £125m to £119m, profit on player sales halved from £6m to £3m and expenses rose £17m. After tax, prior season’s £26m profit was down to £3m, as the tax charge dropped from £4.1m to £0.5m. Image
Read 39 tweets
Fulham’s financial results for 2018/19 cover a season when they were relegated back to the Championship after just one year in the Premier League (finishing 19th). They dismissed two managers: Slavisa Jokanovic in November & Claudio Ranieri in February. Some thought follow #FFC
#FFC reduced their loss from £45m to £20m. However, the club still lost money, despite revenue rising £100m from £38m to £138m following promotion, as competing in the Premier League increased expenses by £63m, while profit on player sales fell £11m to £3m. Image
The main driver of the #FFC £100m revenue increase was broadcasting, which rose £87m from £22m to £109m, due to the significantly more lucrative Premier League TV deal, though commercial also grew £8m (88%) to £18m, while gate receipts were up £3.7m (53%) to £10.7m. Image
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AFC Bournemouth’s 2018/19 financial results covered a season when they finished 14th in the Premier League, securing a fifth consecutive year in the top flight. Some thoughts follow #AFCB
#AFCB loss before tax almost tripled from £11m to £32m, very largely due to higher staff costs and a small £4m (3%) drop in revenue from £135m to £131m, though profit on player sales rose slightly from £1.3m to £3.1m.
#AFCB £4m revenue fall largely due to broadcasting income dropping £3.6m (3%) to £116m, due to a lower finish in the league, though match day also fell £0.3m (6%) to £5.0m, partly offset by commercial rising £0.2m (2%) to £10.2m. Other income (player loans) up £2.8m to £8.0m.
Read 39 tweets
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2018/19 financial results covered a “successful” season, when they finished 7th in their first season back in the Premier League since 2012, reached the FA Cup semi-final and qualified for the Europa League. Some thoughts in the following thread #WWFC
Since being bought by Chinese investment group Fosun International in July 2016, #WWFC is a club transformed, helped by a close relationship with super-agent Jorge Mendes. Under charismatic manager Nuno Espirito Santo, Wolves can realistically compete for European qualification.
#WWFC swung from £57m loss before tax in the Championship to £20m profit in the Premier League, a £77m improvement, as revenue surged from £26m to a club record £172m and profit on player sales was up £4m to £12m, though costs also increased significantly in the top flight.
Read 40 tweets
Watford’s 2018/19 financial results covered a season that the club understandably described as “successful”, improving their position in the Premier League from 14th to 11th and reaching the FA Cup Final (beaten by #MCFC). Some thoughts in the following thread #WatfordFC
#WatfordFC made a £9.8m profit before tax, compared to a £31m loss in the prior year, as revenue rose £19m (15%) to a record £148m, and profit on player sales increased from £3m to £22m. Also boosted by a £4.5m settlement following Marco Silva’s acrimonious move to #EFC.
#WatfordFC £19m revenue growth was mainly due to a £15m (14%) increase in broadcasting to £124m, thanks to the higher Premier League finishing position and FA Cup run, while there were also rises in commercial, up £3m (28%) to £13.6m, and match day, up £1.3m (16%) to £9.2m.
Read 39 tweets
A previous thread explained the differences between a football club’s profit and loss account and its cash flow statement, as it is important to understand where the money has been spent. This thread will look at how this works for each of the 20 Premier League clubs in 2017/18.
#AFC went from £52m operating profit to £42m operating loss, due to lower revenue after failing to qualify for the Champions League, compounded by higher wages and player amortisation plus Wenger pay-off. However, £120m profit on player sales resulted in £70m profit before tax.
#AFC cash flow boosted by favourable £58m movement in working capital (increase in creditors). Spent £29m (net) on players (purchases £110m, sales £81m). Paid £20m for Emirates loan (£11m interest & £9m debt) plus £12m tax. Net cash inflow of £51m was highest in Premier League.
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One of the questions most frequently asked by football fans is “Where’s all the money gone?” The answer is only partly found in a club’s profit and loss account, so we need to also look at the cash flow statement to get the full picture. Some thoughts in the following thread.
A club’s profit and loss account is easy to understand, as it is basically revenue less expenses (mainly player wages), but this is an accounting profit based on the accruals concept, which can be very different from actual cash movements.
This is important, as the main reason that football clubs fail is cash flow problems. It does not matter how large your revenue is (or your profits are), if you do not have the cash to pay your players, suppliers or indeed the taxman, then you will find yourself in trouble.
Read 39 tweets
As the 2018/19 Premier League season approaches, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the impact of the new three-year TV deal on clubs’ revenue, particularly the changes in the distribution system for the overseas TV deals. Some thoughts in the following thread.
As a reminder, in 2018/19 each club received equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34m, overseas TV £43m and commercial income £5m. Each league position was worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live was worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
Therefore, each club received a total of £82m from equal payments with the only differences in Premier League TV distribution due to: (a) league position, ranging from #MCFC £38m to #HTAFC £2m; (b) live TV games, from #LFC £33m to £12m for #AFCB, #HTAFC, #SaintsFC and Watford.
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Although Derby County’s fans will be bitterly disappointed after losing to Aston Villa in the 2018/19 Championship play-off final, it might still be worth looking at their 2017/18 accounts to show how the club is trying to meet its financial challenges. Some thoughts follow #DCFC
#DCFC went from a £7.9m loss to £14.6m profit, mainly due to £40m from selling & leasing back Pride Park Stadium. Revenue was only up £0.6m (2%) to £29.6m, though this was the club’s highest in the Championship without parachute payments. Profit on player sales fell £12m to £4m.
Main reason for #DCFC revenue increase was an away FA Cup game at Manchester United, which meant match receipts were up £0.5m (5%) to £9.1m. Broadcasting also rose £0.2m (2%) to £8.1m, due to higher Premier League solidarity payment, but commercial was down £0.1m to £12.4m.
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With Aston Villa and Derby County facing each other in today’s Championship play-off final for promotion to the Premier League, let’s take a closer look at what has been described as the most lucrative match in world football. Some thoughts in the following thread #AVFC #DCFC
The Championship play-off winners will receive nearly £180m TV money over the next 3 seasons: at least £97m from the Premier League in 2019/20 (based on 20th place), then £78m parachute payments (2 years if relegated after one season in the PL) plus £5m EFL distribution.
The losers of the Championship play-off will receive around £20m over next 3 seasons: £13.5m Premier League solidarity payments (£4.5m a year) plus £6.9m EFL central distribution (£2.3m a year). So the difference between winning and losing this match is £160m (£180m less £20m).
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The Premier League has published its TV revenue for the 2018/19 season, ranging from £97m for #HTAFC to £152m for #LFC, who earned more than league winners #MCFC £151m, due to more matches broadcast live. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Each club receives equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34.4m, overseas TV £43.2m and commercial income £5.0m. Each league position is worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live is worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
#LFC Premier League TV money increased by £6.5m from £145.9m to £152.4m in 2018/19, due to a £3.6m higher merit payment (for finishing 2nd, compared to 4th the previous season) and £2.4m more from overseas TV deals. Benefited from most live TV games: 29 vs. #MCFC 26.
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Swansea City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a “difficult” season when they finished 18th, so were relegated to the Championship after 7 consecutive years in the Premier League. They had 3 managers: Paul Clement, Carlos Carvahal and Graham Potter. Some thoughts follow #Swans
#Swans made a loss before tax of £3.2m, compared to a prior year profit of £13.4m, representing a £16.6m deterioration, as revenue fell £1m from £128m to £127m, though profit on player sales was up £9m to £46m. After tax, the club went from a £13.0m profit to a £2.9m loss.
#Swans £1m revenue fall was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £4.7m (4%) decrease from £109.4m to £104.7m, due to less prize money for a lower league position. In contrast, commercial rose £3.8m (35%) from £10.7m to £14.5m, while match day was flat at £7.4m.
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Newcastle United’s 2017/18 financial results reflect their promotion after a single season in the Championship. Managing director Lee Charnley said, “A 10th placed finish in our first season back in the Premier League was a fantastic achievement.” Some thoughts follow #nufc
#NUFC promotion brought the club back to “a healthy financial position”, moving from £47m loss before tax to £23m profit, as revenue more than doubled from £86m to a record £178m and no repeat of prior year £32m exceptional costs: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts.
#NUFC £93m revenue growth very largely driven by broadcasting’s £79m increase to £126m, reflecting vastly higher TV money in the Premier League, while commercial also increased £13m (90%) to £28m, but match day flat at £24m. However, profit on player sales dropped £39m to £4m.
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I published a study last week on where Premier League clubs source their money and what they spend it on by reviewing the clubs’ cash flow statements over the last decade. Today I do a similar exercise on Championship clubs – where the picture is very different.
In the 10 years between 2008 and 2017 Championship clubs had over £2.8 bln of available cash with the vast majority of financing £2.5 bln coming from their owners (loans £1.9bln and shares £0.6 bln)
So an incredible 87% of Championship clubs’ cash came from owner financing with just 7% from operating activities. This is in stark contrast to the Premier League with 54% from operations and 42% from owners. There was also £41m from (net) player sales & £45m from bank balances.
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THREAD: 🏴 #PremierLeague strength of schedule breakdown 📊

We rank each side on how many points they can expect to pick up from the next six games using our xG model 👇
1. #ManCity – 14.3 xPoints
City will face sides with an average position of just above midtable over the next six games, looking at average of 2.38 xPoints per game.

#MCFC @City_Watch @City_Chief @SuperbiaProeIia @PicturedCity @City_Xtra @9320pod 👇
2. #LFC – 13.2 xPoints
Liverpool look set to continue their good start to the season. Despite facing #MUFC, we make the Reds’ trip to #WatfordFC their hardest fixture.

@AnfieldEdition @AnfieldHQ @TheRedmenTV @LFCData @anfieldonline @BassTunedToRed 👇
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Although the 2016/17 financial results for the Championship are now a season out-of-date, they are the most recent published by the clubs, so people might still be interested in the comparisons as the new season kicks-off. Some thoughts in the following thread.
In contrast to the Premier League, only 6 clubs in the Championship made money, led by #NFFC £32m & #BarnsleyFC £13m. In this very competitive division most clubs over-extend in a bid to reach the lucrative top flight. Largest losses at 2 promoted clubs: #NUFC £47m & #BHAFC £39m.
Some clubs’ figures impacted by significant exceptional items, so #NFFC (£40m) and #ReadingFC (£9m) were boosted by loan write-offs. In contrast, promotion bonuses adversely affected #HTAFC £12m, #NUFC £10m and #BHAFC £9m. Newcastle also booked £22m onerous contract provisions.
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Blackburn Rovers’ financial results for 2016/17 covered “a season to forget for #Rovers fans”, as the club was relegated from the Championship to League One with manager Owen Coyle replaced by Tony Mowbray. The good news is that they have immediately bounced back in 2017/18.
#Rovers loss worsened by £2.3m from £1.5m to £3.8m, mainly due to £7.1m (32%) reduction in revenue to £14.9m and £6.0m fall in profit on player sales to £10.4m, offset by cost cuts: wages £3.4m (13%) to £22.0m, other expenses £4.8m (51%) to £4.5m & player amortisation £1.8m.
Main reason for what #Rovers Finance Director Mike Cheston described as “a significant drop in income” was the loss of parachute payments £10.5m, though the blow was softened by £4.3m solidarity payments. Match day and commercial slightly declined, by £0.2m & £0.1m respectively.
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