Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #justinianicplague

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Start updating your #BlackDeath lectures, folks! Hannah Barker has just released a pre-print of her eye-popping, paradigm-shifting study: "Laying the Corpses to Rest: Grain, Embargoes, and Yersinia pestis in the Black Sea, 1346-1348," scholar.google.com/scholar_url?ur… #GlobalMiddleAges
I'll be tweeting some significant findings from this paper over the next several days, as we build up to next week's "Mother of All Pandemics" session sponsored by the @MedievalAcademy (medievalacademy.org/general/custom…). Today, just fn. 3, on Issyk Kul.
fn. 3: "Since Lake Issyk Kul is located near a plague reservoir, this outbreak may have no causal connection with the Second Pandemic." Okay, so what's Issyk Kul, and what has it ever played any role in #BlackDeath narratives?
Read 21 tweets
Okay, since @KevinMKruse now seems to have given his imprimatur to this piece in the @washingtonpost today about #nCoV2019 & past plagues, it seems time for a mini-thread about #medhist & hot takes. #epitwitter: you might want to listen in on this, as it effects you, too.
@KevinMKruse @washingtonpost The @washingtonpost piece by Eisenberg et al. makes 3 main points: 1) that the #BlackDeath (the #plague pandemic usually dated to the mid-14thC) is the most commonly invoked analogy when people think of epidemics; 2) that not all "plague" epidemics/pandemics were alike; and 3) ..
@KevinMKruse @washingtonpost ... that there's an "outbreak narrative" that "we replay .. as a script with each new outbreak — whether real or fictional." First, some background on what #histmed (History of Medicine) is: it's probably pretty much as you would assume from its name. The field of history that ..
Read 17 tweets
I keep seeing this come up so I'm going to address it:

#Huns #Xiongnu #Migration #JustinianicPlague

bbc.com/news/science-e…
First of all, here's the actual article from Nature:

nature.com/articles/s4158…
The study focused on genome sequencing of 137 individuals on the Eurasian steppes divided into five extremely broad, genetically defined phases: 3000-2100 BC, 2100-1200 BC, 1200-200 BC, 200BC-600 AD, and 600-1500 AD. The second to last of which is just broadly called "Hunnic."
Read 18 tweets

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