Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #mcfc

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Manchester United are the first Premier League club to publish 2018/19 financial results, covering a disappointing season when they finished sixth in the league and were eliminated in the Champions League quarter-finals by Barcelona. Some thoughts in the following thread #MUFC
#MUFC profit before tax was up slightly from £26m to £27m, as revenue rose £37m (6%) to a record £627m, but the wage bill also increased £36m (12%) to £332m. After tax club went from £38m loss to £19m profit, as prior year was impacted by non-cash write-off due to US tax reform.
#MUFC first English club above £600m revenue. Almost all growth was in broadcasting, up £37m (18%) to £241m, due to Champions League participation (and new rights agreement). Commercial and match day flat at £275m and £111m respectively. Profit on player sales £8m higher at £26m.
Read 45 tweets
A previous thread explained the differences between a football club’s profit and loss account and its cash flow statement, as it is important to understand where the money has been spent. This thread will look at how this works for each of the 20 Premier League clubs in 2017/18.
#AFC went from £52m operating profit to £42m operating loss, due to lower revenue after failing to qualify for the Champions League, compounded by higher wages and player amortisation plus Wenger pay-off. However, £120m profit on player sales resulted in £70m profit before tax.
#AFC cash flow boosted by favourable £58m movement in working capital (increase in creditors). Spent £29m (net) on players (purchases £110m, sales £81m). Paid £20m for Emirates loan (£11m interest & £9m debt) plus £12m tax. Net cash inflow of £51m was highest in Premier League.
Read 42 tweets
One of the questions most frequently asked by football fans is “Where’s all the money gone?” The answer is only partly found in a club’s profit and loss account, so we need to also look at the cash flow statement to get the full picture. Some thoughts in the following thread.
A club’s profit and loss account is easy to understand, as it is basically revenue less expenses (mainly player wages), but this is an accounting profit based on the accruals concept, which can be very different from actual cash movements.
This is important, as the main reason that football clubs fail is cash flow problems. It does not matter how large your revenue is (or your profits are), if you do not have the cash to pay your players, suppliers or indeed the taxman, then you will find yourself in trouble.
Read 39 tweets
Given the importance of broadcasting income to football clubs, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the differences between the Big 5 European leagues, both in terms of the money received and the distribution methods. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Most of the Premier League TV money is distributed equally: 50% of the domestic deal, overseas deals and commercial revenue. Merit payment (25% of domestic) is based on league position, while facility fees (25% of domestic) are based on number of times club shown live on TV.
As a result, #LFC actually earned most TV money from the Premier League in 2018/19 with £152m, despite finishing behind #MCFC £151m in the league, as they were broadcast live on 3 more occasions than City. The three relegated clubs averaged around £100m.
Read 25 tweets
We get every Premier League player to sit down on camera and say how they want their name pronounced - and there’s LOADS I did wrong. So here’s a thread so you don’t make the same mistakes I did!
First of all - Norwich City’s Teemu Pukki. His first name is actually pronounced ‘TAY-mu’ #ncfc
How about Chelsea’s #USMNT star Christian Pulisic? His surname is ‘puh-LISS-ick’, no Eastern European style ‘itch’ on the end #CFC
Read 11 tweets
There is much talk about the so-called “Big Six” pulling away from the rest of the Premier League financially, but is this actually true? This thread looks at this question from the perspective of revenue, wages and total player costs #AFC #CFC #LFC #MCFC #MUFC #THFC
For the purpose of this analysis, we will take the 7th highest club in terms of revenue and wages for each season between 2010 and 2018. This means that the 7th placed club is not always the same. For example, for the last 4 seasons’ revenue this was #EFC, #LCFC, #WHUFC & #NUFC.
The highest revenue in the 2018 Premier League was #MUFC £590m, followed by #MCFC £503m, #LFC £455m, #CFC £448m, #AFC £389m, #THFC £379m and #EFC £189m. The highest growth since 2010 came at #MCFC with £378m (or 300%).
Read 20 tweets
Football is finally back. Premier League Predictions thread: #PL
20. Steve Bruce is just such an underwhelming appointment. ASM and Joelinton have a lot of potential but relying on them this early in their PL careers seems a risk. If Newcastle do stay up, I have a feeling they’ll get Arab owners soon. The fans would deserve it. #NUFC
19 Crystal Palace. Without Batshuayi and AWB a gaping hole in the team has been left. Relying on a Ayew and Camarasa (he’s decent) isn’t the brightest decision. What kind of mood will Zaha be in? This and Hodgsons experience may be the last hope for Palace. #CPFC
Read 22 tweets
In preparation for the upcoming 2018/19 Premier League season, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the transfer spend over the last decade, including the growing impact on debt. The analysis is split between 3 periods: last 3 years, last 5 years and last 10 years.
The transfer fees spend is taken from the clubs’ cash flow statements, as this is the only completely accurate source of data. However, it is worth noting that this does not always represent the full cost of transfers, due to the (increasing) use of stage payments.
In the very few cases where a cash flow statement was not available, e.g. if a club only published abbreviated accounts while they were in lower leagues, I have taken data for those years from the Transfermarkt website.
Read 24 tweets
As the 2018/19 Premier League season approaches, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the impact of the new three-year TV deal on clubs’ revenue, particularly the changes in the distribution system for the overseas TV deals. Some thoughts in the following thread.
As a reminder, in 2018/19 each club received equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34m, overseas TV £43m and commercial income £5m. Each league position was worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live was worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
Therefore, each club received a total of £82m from equal payments with the only differences in Premier League TV distribution due to: (a) league position, ranging from #MCFC £38m to #HTAFC £2m; (b) live TV games, from #LFC £33m to £12m for #AFCB, #HTAFC, #SaintsFC and Watford.
Read 26 tweets
As Arsenal fans nervously await the outcome of this summer’s transfer window, I thought it might be interesting to look at why the club is facing more financial challenges these days. Some thoughts in the following thread #afcb
On the face of it, #AFC are doing fine, having reported profits for 16 consecutive years, adding up to a grand total of £393m, averaging £25m a year. Furthermore, Arsenal’s profits in the last two years were a healthy £70m in 2017/18 and £45m in 2016/17.
In fact, #AFC £70m profit before tax in 2017/18 (the most recent published accounts) was actually the fifth highest ever registered in the Premier League, though it is worth noting that this was comfortably surpassed by two rivals that season: #THFC £139m and #LFC £125m.
Read 40 tweets
After Saturday’s final, the estimates for this season’s Champions League revenue for Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur can be updated. We can also look at the incredible amounts of TV income earned by English clubs in 2018/19. Some analysis in the following thread #LFC #THFC
#LFC earned an additional €4m for winning the competition (for the sixth time), bringing their total to €111m (£98m), while #THFC remain at €102m (£90m). As a reminder, #MUFC and #MCFC received €93m (£83m) and €93m (82m) respectively.
#LFC 2018/19 Champions League revenue of €111m (£98m) is €30m (£26m) higher than €81m (£72m) they earned in 2017/18, having won the trophy against “only” reaching the final. It includes: participation €15.3m, prize money €60.0m, UEFA coefficient €23.3m & TV pool €12.7m.
Read 16 tweets
After last night’s Europa League final, the estimates for this season’s Europa League revenue for Arsenal and Chelsea can be updated #CFC earned an additional €4m for winning the competition, bringing their total to €44m (£39m), while #AFC remain at €36m (£32m).
However, #CFC 2018/19 Europa League revenue of €44m (£39m) is €21m (£19m) lower than the €65m (£58m) they earned in the 2017/18 Champions League. It includes: participation €2.9m, prize money €18.3m, UEFA coefficient €3.4m & TV pool €19.1m.
Despite reaching the final, #AFC 2018/19 revenue of €36m (£32m) is €2m (£1m) lower than the €38m (£33m) they earned for getting to the semi-final in 2017/18. It includes: participation €2.9m, prize money €14.3m, UEFA coefficient €3.4m and TV pool €15.6m.
Read 9 tweets
The Premier League has published its TV revenue for the 2018/19 season, ranging from £97m for #HTAFC to £152m for #LFC, who earned more than league winners #MCFC £151m, due to more matches broadcast live. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Each club receives equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34.4m, overseas TV £43.2m and commercial income £5.0m. Each league position is worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live is worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
#LFC Premier League TV money increased by £6.5m from £145.9m to £152.4m in 2018/19, due to a £3.6m higher merit payment (for finishing 2nd, compared to 4th the previous season) and £2.4m more from overseas TV deals. Benefited from most live TV games: 29 vs. #MCFC 26.
Read 14 tweets
Last week I estimated how much English clubs would earn from the 2018/19 Champions League. Today I take a look at this season’s Europa League revenue for Arsenal and Chelsea #AFC #CFC
Although total Europa League revenue has significantly increased (by 40%) in 2018/19, two points are worth noting: (a) this is lower than the 54% Champions League increase; (b) the impact of the new UEFA coefficient (though only 15% of total distribution, compared to 30% in CL).
As a result, both #AFC and #CFC are estimated to earn less than last year. #CFC is obvious, as they were in the Champions League in 2017/18, but #AFC is due to the impact of UEFA coefficient & TV pool. As it stands (prior year in brackets):

#AFC €36m (€38m)
#CFC €40m (€65m)
Read 16 tweets
Following their incredible exploits this week, Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur have reached the Champions League final, so we can now update our estimate of how much English clubs will earn from the 2018/19 competition #LFC #THFC #MCFC #MUFC
Due to the significant increase (around 50%) in Champions League revenue in 2018/19, all English clubs will earn much more than prior season (2017/18 comparatives in brackets). As it stands:

#LFC €107m (€81m)
#THFC €102m (€61m)
#MCFC €93m (€64m)
#MUFC €93m (€40m)
#LFC Champions League revenue is €107m for reaching the final, up from €81m last season.

Includes: participation €15m, prize money €56m, UEFA coefficient €23m and TV pool €13m.

If they win the final, they will earn an additional €4m, bringing their total to €111m.
Read 11 tweets
Swansea City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a “difficult” season when they finished 18th, so were relegated to the Championship after 7 consecutive years in the Premier League. They had 3 managers: Paul Clement, Carlos Carvahal and Graham Potter. Some thoughts follow #Swans
#Swans made a loss before tax of £3.2m, compared to a prior year profit of £13.4m, representing a £16.6m deterioration, as revenue fell £1m from £128m to £127m, though profit on player sales was up £9m to £46m. After tax, the club went from a £13.0m profit to a £2.9m loss.
#Swans £1m revenue fall was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £4.7m (4%) decrease from £109.4m to £104.7m, due to less prize money for a lower league position. In contrast, commercial rose £3.8m (35%) from £10.7m to £14.5m, while match day was flat at £7.4m.
Read 44 tweets
Now that we have reached the semi-final stage of the 2018/19 Champions League, we can estimate how much English clubs will earn from this competition. This is not completely straightforward, due to changes in the distribution method, but let’s have a go in the following thread.
First of all, the total amount distributed to clubs in the 2018/19 Champions League has increased by 54% (€681m) from €1.269 bln to €1.950 bln. This is now split: participation €488m (25%), performance €585m (30%), TV pool €292m (15%) and coefficient rankings €585m (30%).
In 2018/19 each of the 32 clubs that qualified for the Champions League group stage get €15.25m plus €2.7m for a win & €900k for a draw. Additional prize money for each further stage reached: last 16 €9.5m, quarter-final €10.5m, semi-final €12m, final €15m & winners €19m.
Read 21 tweets
Newcastle United’s 2017/18 financial results reflect their promotion after a single season in the Championship. Managing director Lee Charnley said, “A 10th placed finish in our first season back in the Premier League was a fantastic achievement.” Some thoughts follow #nufc
#NUFC promotion brought the club back to “a healthy financial position”, moving from £47m loss before tax to £23m profit, as revenue more than doubled from £86m to a record £178m and no repeat of prior year £32m exceptional costs: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts.
#NUFC £93m revenue growth very largely driven by broadcasting’s £79m increase to £126m, reflecting vastly higher TV money in the Premier League, while commercial also increased £13m (90%) to £28m, but match day flat at £24m. However, profit on player sales dropped £39m to £4m.
Read 48 tweets
Crystal Palace’s 2017/18 financial results covered their 5th consecutive season in the Premier League, when they finished “in a very creditable” 11th place. Roy Hodgson replaced Frank De Boer as manager in September 2017. Some thoughts in the following thread #CPFC
#CPFC posted a £35.5m loss before tax, compared to an £11.8m profit the prior year, mainly due to profit on player sales falling £32m to just £2m, though revenue grew £7.6m (5%) from £142.7m to a club record £150.3m. Loss after tax was £33.4m, thanks to a £2.1m tax credit.
#CPFC £8m revenue growth was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £4m (4%) increase from £117m to £121m, mainly due to increased prize money for finishing 11th, while commercial also increased £3.1m (21%) from £15.2m to £18.3m and match day was up £0.3m (2%) to £10.9m.
Read 38 tweets
As the Champions League and Europa League reach the quarter-final stage, I took a quick look at the latest available revenue and wages data for those clubs still in the competition. Some brief comparisons in the following thread.
Three clubs in the Champions League quarter-finals have over half a billion pounds revenue, led by Barcelona £612m, followed by the two Manchester clubs, #MUFC £590m and #MCFC £500m. Other English clubs: #LFC £455m and #THFC £379m. Lowest revenue by far at Ajax £81m & Porto £94m.
Barcelona £431m have by far the highest wage bill (even after excluding other sports), followed by #MUFC £296m. #LFC £264m and #MCFC £260m are closely matched, way ahead of the other English club #THFC £148m. Porto and Ajax only £75m and £47m respectively.
Read 6 tweets
Tottenham Hotspur’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 3rd in the Premier League and reached the last 16 of the Champions League and the FA Cup semi-finals. Home games played at Wembley, while new stadium was being developed. Some thoughts follow #THFC
#THFC profit before tax improved by £87m from £52m to £139m, as revenue rose by £71m (23%) to £381m and profit on player sales was up £33m to £73m. New club records for both revenue and profit. Profit after tax “only” increased by £77m from £36m to £113m.
All three #THFC revenue streams increased: commercial rose £33m (43%) from £76m to £109m; match day was up £26m (57%) from £45m to £71m, due to the larger capacity at Wembley; while broadcasting was £13m (7%) higher at £201m, due to advancing further in the Champions League.
Read 47 tweets
Paris Saint-Germain’s 2017/18 financial results cover a season when they won every domestic completion, including Ligue 1 for the 5th time in 6 years, but were eliminated by eventual winners Real Madrid in the Champions League last 16. Some thoughts in the following thread #PSG
#PSG were acquired in 2011 by Qatar Sports Investments (QSI), a subsidiary of Qatar's sovereign wealth fund Qatar Investment Authority (QIA), making the club by far the richest in France and one of the wealthiest in the world. Nasser Al-Khelaifi is the club’s chairman and CEO.
Pre-tax #PSG went from a €19m loss to a €40m profit, a €59m improvement. Revenue (DNCG definition) rose €54m (11%) from €503m to a record high of €557m, while profit on player sales shot up €132m to €145m. This was partially offset by significant cost growth.
Read 48 tweets
Southampton’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 17th in the Premier League and reached the FA Cup semi-finals, much worse than previous season (8th place in PL, competed in the Europa League and got to the EFL Cup final). Some thoughts follow #SaintsFC
Although #SaintsFC directors described the season as “disappointing”, they were “pleased to report another year of positive financial performance.” This was the first season under the ownership of Lander Sports (UK), controlled by Chinese businessman Jisheng Gao.
#SaintsFC pre-tax profit fell from £42m to £35m, as revenue dropped 16% (£30m) to £153m, due to the poor performance on the pitch, though this was largely offset by profit on player sales increasing by £27m to £69m. Profit after tax was down from £34m to £29m.
Read 38 tweets
On a train and I can’t do the work I wanted to because of WiFi issues so...

One like = one random #MCFC player from the past that I still think about from time to time for absolutely no reason - good or bad.

(Succinct, I know)
(You might wanna mute this, assuming it actually gets any likes...)
Djamel Belmadi was brought in on loan for half a season under Kevin Keegan purely because he was mates with Ali Benarbia. Think he scored once against Fulham in the final season at Maine Road.
Read 75 tweets

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