Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #miltwitter

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Part 7 of my Running Gear series, today looking at track types. The series is looking at all the bits of tracked vehicle mobility and started here (bit.ly/30596QZ) if you want to follow the threads. Hope its interesting.
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science; I’m just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
Track comes in two flavours – single pin and double pin. Broadly speaking, double pin is the contemporary norm for most of the world, though there are plenty of single pin examples in service, especially in Russia where two pin is relatively new still
Read 16 tweets
Epilogue

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2 of 21:

Eight months ago, on an overcast Tuesday morning, Dr. John Bonin (@ArmyWarCollege) and the 18th Airborne Corps historian met in a building on @USAGCBPA named after J Lawton Collins to write this Twitter novel.
3 of 21:

Early on, we brought @Mother_Of_Tanks into the project.
Read 22 tweets
Chapter 15: The Blood of Multitudes
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During the past two weeks, we’ve released more than 1,000 tweets about this critical moment in our Army’s history. We’ve asked a lot of our audience and your engagement means the world to us.
3 of 18:

The period from 1953 to 1961 holds lessons about the psychology of power and the changing nature of global security. Many of those ideas were discussed at length by the #MilTwitter community in response to each #AtomicAgeArmy chapter.
Read 18 tweets
Chapter 14: American Bloodline
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Welcome back! We’re going to start with a little recap because we know some of this (or all of it) is new material for much of our audience and we want to make it easier to enjoy.
3 of 117

We’ve talked about the Army adopting the Pentomic concept in the late 1950s. The term “Pentomic Division” was used to represent the new structure, containing five subordinate units, with the purpose of maintaining functionality across domains.
Read 117 tweets
Part 6 of my Running Gear series, today looking at tracked suspension. The series is looking at all the bits of tracked vehicle mobility and started here (bit.ly/30596QZ) if you want to follow the threads. Hope its interesting.
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science; I’m just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
Whilst there have been many historic suspension designs, contemporary AFV almost exclusively use either torsion bar or hydro pneumatic (hydrogas) systems, so I'm looking at those here. Historic stuff perhaps another day!
Read 23 tweets
Part 4 of my Running Gear series, today looking at sprockets. The series is looking at all the bits of tracked vehicle mobility stuff and started here (bit.ly/30596QZ) if you want to follow the threads. Hope its interesting.
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science; I’m just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
The sprocket is the toothed wheel that transfers drive from the transmission and final drives to the track itself. Teeth on the sprocket engage with the track links at each end – holes in the body of the track for single-pin, and between the end connectors for double-pin.
Read 19 tweets
Part 3 of my running gear series, today looking at track return rollers. The series is looking at all the bits of a tracked vehicle mobility stuff and started here (bit.ly/30596QZ) if you want to follow the threads. Image
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science; I’m just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
Track can be supported or unsupported as it transits the top run. If supported, several track return rollers (or top rollers) are used. They prevent track bouncing/slapping and help to avoid lateral movements that could see a de-track incident via engagement with the track horns Image
Read 8 tweets
I can't let this story go. It's so bad. Here is what I know about the Vindman brothers from my limited interactions. They are Boy Scouts. Two incredibly decent professional soldiers who have served honorably...and continue to do so. Meanwhile the White House is desperate.
So, someone there calls up Lippman from Politico and says "hey...have you seen these tweets from the other Vindman? This is a story you should...you know...look into." So, he thinks he's got something hot. Retweets or articles that vaguely criticize the President and SECDEF.
He's positive he's got a scandal that's going to get LTC Vindman in trouble with the Army but he knows so little about our regulations that he doesn't realize Eugene is following it to the letter on his verified account with his real name and picture on it. The Army doesn't care!
Read 6 tweets
Part 2 of my Running Gear series, today looking at roadwheels. The series is looking at all the bits of a tracked vehicle mobility stuff and started here (bit.ly/30596QZ) if you want to follow the threads. Hope its interesting.
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science; I’m just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
An AFV is really a wheeled vehicle, it just brings its own road with it to run on. Roadwheels bear the weight of the vehicle and are the primary interface with the track and thus terrain
Read 14 tweets
1 of 54: Chapter 2: Russia Does it Herself
This story is part of a weeklong #MilTwitter conversation regarding the @USArmy during the Atomic Age (1954 - 1961).

@ColdWarPod @peterwsinger
3 of 54: Every day at 9AM and 2PM we will post new stories on this theme, with discussion, dialogue, and input from some of the coolest accounts on Twitter.
Read 54 tweets
1 of XVIII: The atomic bomb did more than end WWII. It ushered in a new way of thinking about military force and state power.
2 of XVIII: And, in 1949, when the Soviet Union successfully tested its own nuclear weapons, this new devastating capability split the world between two powers, the US and the USSR, with the ability to wipe out large swaths of civilizations.
3 of XVIII: Today we start a weeklong series of threads regarding the remaking of the @USArmy during this time, primarily focusing on the period between 1956 and 1961.
Read 19 tweets
What started as a brief thread on running gear rapidly got out of hand, so instead I’m doing a series of short threads on the major elements of tracked vehicle running gear design and the component parts, what variance there is and why. First a short introductory thread on tracks
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science; I’m just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
Continuous track dates to 1830s with one of the first patents being the ‘universal railway” invented by Sir George Cayley. In 1832 a tracked steam ploughing engine was built by British textile manufacturer John Heathcote and was moderately successful until it sank into a swamp.
Read 13 tweets
With the news of @DefenseSoucy teaming with @SupacatLtd for the UK, a few cool facts showing why CRT technology is awesome. (Note: this thread comes off a bit advertorial but its just that the tech is undeniably impressive and Soucy are the leaders in this field)
CRT for those new to the tech is Composite Rubber Track (“rubber band tracks” colloquially) and is an alternative to conventional steel segmented track. Consists of a single piece composite track, with new running gear components (roadhweels, idler, sprokcet etc)
Called composite for a reason, its not actually just a giant rubber band, but a continuously cased rubber band structure reinforced with a range of composite materials as well as longitudinal and lateral steel cords.
Read 22 tweets
Critical Dimensions, latest of my AFV design threads. Critical dimensions are those that define the overall size of the vehicle and constrain many other elements. This is a long one, and still doesn’t come close to covering it properly. I need a blog... #miltwitter #tanktwitter
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I don’t have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science, I’mim just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV design. With that out the way…
The core critical dimensions are the vehicle’s overall length, width and height. Broadly speaking you want the maximum width and length you can get to maximise volume, but the lowest height to minimise presented target to the enemy
Read 39 tweets
#miltwitter Before COVID, I planned to spend time w/my best friend this weekend. Arlington is closed, but I want to tell you about Michael Yury Tarlavsky.

“As long as we live, they too will live; for they are now are a part of us; as we remember them.” 1/
Mike commanded an ODA in 1/5 SFG. He was KIA on 12 AUG 2004 while leading a raid in Najaf against a JAM strongpoint. Mike was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. That is what he did—let me tell you who he was. 2/
Mike was born 46 yrs ago Sunday in Latvia— and immigrated to New Orleans when he was a young boy. He never said much about this time in his life, just mentioned once in passing that no one in his family spoke English when they arrived. We called him "CPT America." 3/
Read 18 tweets
A brief primer on mobility implications of track width. I'm doing a series of these following warm reception to earlier thread on drive sprocket location (bit.ly/3aUGGNP). Spoiler: wider is better, but some interesting physics on the way #miltwitter #tanktwitter Image
Usual disclaimer - this is Twitter, I dont have much space and so some things are simplified or omitted for simplicity. This is a hugely complex science, and im no expert, just giving a flavour of the considerations inherent in AFV mobility. With that out the way… Image
One of the greatest impacts on tracked vehicle mobility is contact area between track and surface. Increasing track length and width increases contact area, which defines your available thrust and generally decreases normal pressure and thus improves mobility as a generic concept Image
Read 16 tweets
More alternate ways to think about future armoured forces and the role of the tank within them. This time proposing reduced tank fleets due to the increasing capability of IFV-class armaments covering off most (and sometimes more) of what tanks bring #miltwitter
Previous discussion (bit.ly/2K5XntT) offered the notion, recently proposed by John Cockerill at January's IAV conference, that 105 mm is a capable round for the vast majority, if not all, secondary tank targets, so future forces could look at a hi/lo 130/105mm fleet mix
As before, acknowledging that tanks excel utilising their extreme overmatch in lethality over most opposing vehicles to rapidly break through and then exploit via high mobility. This remains a hugely valuable mission, and one that we will enduringly need tanks to execute
Read 13 tweets
Good Morning #miltwitter,
@danielmkim has given me permission to hijack #CookingForLieutenants and teach you how to make Sausage Gravy for Biscuits and Gravy
One of the best thing about being in the Military is being able to sample food outside what you grew up with. As a white boy from Western Colorado, we didn't do biscuits and gravy. I learned how to make proper gravy while Mess Cranking in the Wardroom #CookingForLieutenants
Onboard my first ship USS The Sullivans DDG-68. While cranking (KP for you Army types) I worked for CS2 Steen who was from a little town in Georgia that I can't remember. He showed me the way and the truth! #CookingForLieutenants
Read 12 tweets
THREAD. #miltwitter has been abuzz as of late with talks of haircuts, wayward LTs, and the TR. The TR frankly seems like a lifetime ago. Mike Nelson provided his succinct thoughts on judgement and leadership to the LT. 1/
@jimgolby @ahfdc and @lindsaypcohn have weighed in on the TR and the competing loyalties of commanders.
washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/… 2/
@JackieGSchneid had a great thread on the culture of equating hair length with discipline. 3/
Read 31 tweets
#miltwitter Because of my OIF experience, I now associate Muqtada al Sadr with Easter. Bear with me. I was a Company Commander at FOB Chosin in Iskandariyah during the rise of the Mahdi Army across large swaths of southern and central Iraq during April, 2004. 1/
FOB Chosin was constructed at the Musayib Power Plant—at this time, the biggest threat we faced were IEDs across the AO—and the rockets/mortars emanating from Jurf al Sakhr (below), which the nascent insurgency used to operate with impunity as it would take 45 minutes.... 2/
for a patrol to move through Musayib (below), cross the Euphrates, and arrive at the point of origin. We were also hampered in that we had a company detached to 1-505 PIR in Fallujah, and therefore did not have the combat power to allocate to Jurf. It was an economy of force. 3/
Read 22 tweets
A short intro to front vs rear drive on tracked vehicles, off the back of some debates about front and rear engine layouts on future fighting vehicles. I'm no expert, but hopefully lays out the basics for those interested. #miltwitter
Tracked vehicles have a sprocket (geared wheel) and an idler (smooth wheel). The sprocket is transferring drive to the track via obvious mechanical means. You can have the sprocket at the front or the back, and in general tanks use rear, IFV and variants thereof use front.
Broadly engine location constrains drive location as you want the simplest, shortest and most space efficient means to connect transmission to sprocket. That said there have been vehicles with engines not co-located, incl. WW2 favourites Sherman, PzIV and Tiger, amongst others
Read 14 tweets
Thoughts on tank gun calibre, and why a mix of 105 mm and 130 mm w/ATGW support might be a consideration for next gen AFV families. This is more offering alternative novel ideas for consideration than my own preference or opinion. #tanktwitter / #miltwitter
Most discussion around tanks focus on increasing penetration via more advanced ammunition natures for 120 and arguments around whether, and how, to integrate 130 or even 140 in a viable design. #MGCS, DLP and so on all looking at these issues.
Greater pen is certainly a key requirement - the primary role of a tank is exploitation via kinetic defeat of enemy tanks and complete overmatch of lesser AFV. In the direct fire gun vs armour race, armour is slightly ahead at present and 120 mm is close to its theoretical limits
Read 19 tweets
Military/veterans followers: as the incumbent J1 of #MilTwitter, I will be posting a short thread of Title 10 authorities under a national emergency. You will not like all of it. Please familiarize yourself with the basics anyway.
Thread of Title 10 authorities under a national emergency:
Let's get the big one out of the way first. If you are drawing retirement pay and a retired member, you are subject to recall to active duty status. No wiggle room. law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/10…
Thread of Title 10 authorities under a national emergency. "In time of war, or of national emergency [...] the President may suspend operation of any provision of law relating to promotion, involuntary retirement, or separation of commissioned officers." law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/10…
Read 6 tweets
THE END: A FINAL THREAD ON THE BATTLE OF THE BULGE

Tweet 1 of 21

The Battle of the Bulge (“The Ardennes Campaign”) ended on Jan 22, 1945. 75 years later, so too does this Twitter commemoration.
2 of 21: The German lines are now back to their initial jumping off point (pre-Dec 16, 1944) and in some cases even farther. Some of the Panzer forces were as far back as the Siegfried Line.
3 of 21: Hitler's last gamble in the West has ended in failure. The Third Reich is now in its death throes. In months, Hitler will die at his own hands, with his great empire in ruins around him.
Read 21 tweets

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