Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #nbcnewsthreads

Most recents (24)

In rural Nevada, a one-room schoolhouse has educated generations of residents since the early 1950s.

@anitasnews reports from the village of Duckwater. nbcnews.to/2qljciw (1/6)
@anitasnews Only 16 students attend the Duckwater School, an updated version of a frontier days relic: the one-room schoolhouse. The students at the school, range from pre-K to 8th grade. (2/6)
@anitasnews Lyn Huston, 53, the sole teacher at Duckwater also receives help from 2 aides who work with the students in small groups.

One aide doubles as the school’s bus driver, while the other is also the custodian. (3/6)
Read 6 tweets
Many of the Syrian Kurdish refugees rushing to escape the Turkish-led incursion into Syria are carrying all they could grab as well as a sense of outrage at US troops they say abandoned them.

@MattMcBradley reports from a refugee camp in Iraq.

nbcnews.to/33FjCPi (1/5)
@MattMcBradley “America has betrayed the Kurds,” says Rania, 20, from Qamishli, a city along the Turkish border that took heavy Turkish artillery shelling during the early days of the incursion last week. “We worked hand in hand, but no longer. Now there is no future for Syria.” (2/5)
@MattMcBradley Rania was among more than 800 mostly Kurdish Syrians who arrived at Bardarash camp in northern Iraq on Wednesday, fleeing fresh fighting whose ferocity caught civilians, aid agencies, Kurdish fighters and even many US soldiers by surprise. (3/5)
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David Lieth has farmed about 600 acres near this southwest Iowa town for more than 30 years, but he won’t harvest a single ear of corn this year because flooding on the Missouri River covered his fields and didn’t allow him to plant any seed. nbcnews.to/2OJmbeK (1/8)
On an early September morning, Lieth and a roomful of farmers gathered at the local USDA office to find out how much money they would receive for the crops that never made it out of their grain bins and to consumers. (2/8)
“There is some science I do believe we can look at but to setup a new government agency or more government regulation? I’m still wondering if that’s feasible,” Lieth says before the meeting. “I think we can be stewards best by ourselves.” (3/8)
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Rep. Van Drew, a dentist known on Capitol Hill for his snappy suits and pocket squares, is one of just 7 House Democrats holding back support for the impeachment inquiry, earning him praise from the president and protests from progressives. nbcnews.to/2MCagNh (1/4)
97% of House Democrats are now on board with the inquiry leaving a small rump of opposition that seems to dwindle by the day as holdouts defect to the majority.

Van Drew’s district covering the southern tip of NJ sided for Pres. Trump over Hillary Clinton 51-46% in 2016. (2/4)
As Van Drew sees it, impeachment is a pointless, divisive exercise that will poison the well of bipartisanship and prevent Congress from taking up more important issues, like prescription drug prices and infrastructure. (3/4)
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When Ilana Beloborodov, 17, was creating her sign for last month's youth-led climate strike in Boston, she knew she wanted to come up with a slogan other teens would understand.
So she turned to the language of TikTok. nbcnews.to/2BalbIN (1/7)
After spending the morning mulling what reference she'd use, she landed on the phrase "e-girl" — a term for the colorful yet goth-inspired teens on the short-form video app.

Her final product read, “The only e-girl that matters is the earth.” nbcnews.to/2BalbIN (2/7)
Beloborodov is one of a number of teens on TikTok who are making funny videos about politics, the environment and current events.

When she posted a video of the strike and her sign to the app, it exploded with more than 187,000 views. nbcnews.to/2BalbIN (3/7)
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The Trump admin. announced in June that it would move two USDA research agencies from Washington, DC, to Kansas City within 3 months.

The sudden announcement led hundreds of employees to resign or retire early, leaving the two institutions gutted.
nbcnews.to/2LZeejK (1/7)
More than a dozen scientists and experts who are currently or were formerly employed by multiple federal agencies tell @NBCNews the effective dismantling of these two agencies is the most illustrative of the admin.’s intentions: to remove or neuter evidence-based research. (2/7)
Of the 547 employees in the two agencies, only 61 have made the move to Kansas City.

Despite the USDA’s insistence that they are hiring at a rapid clip, many remain skeptical that the two agencies will ever recover.

nbcnews.to/2LZeejK (3/7)
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Nearly a year after Jamal Khashoggi was murdered, his fiancée Hatice Cengiz continues to demand that Saudi Arabia be held accountable. nbcnews.to/2nBGPCb (1/5)
"Saudi Arabia was put under massive pressure thanks to international media coverage," says Cengiz.

"But at the end of the day, all of these efforts did not persuade world leaders to sanction Saudi Arabia. That is so sad.” (2/5)
With the first anniversary of his death approaching on Wednesday, Oct. 2, Cengiz came to New York — where heads of state gathered for the U.N. General Assembly — to demand accountability for Saudi Arabia. (3/5)
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A mother’s loss made her an anti-vaccination star. But vaccines didn’t kill her baby.

Reporting by @brandyzadrozny. nbcnews.com/tech/social-me… (1/7)
@BrandyZadrozny A baby named Evee became a poster child of the anti-vaccination movement. One billboard featuring Evee says "healthy babies don't just die." Her mom blamed vaccines.

But a 911 call and autopsy obtained by @NBCNews shows Evee suffocated while co-sleeping. (2/7)
@BrandyZadrozny @NBCNews The day after Evee died — before the medical examiner had issued any findings — her mother Catelin Clobes poured out her heartbreak and confusion on Facebook.

"This feeling of pain is indescribable," she wrote next to a video of Evee laughing that attracted 3,000 comments. (3/7)
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SPECIAL REPORT: The doctor’s diagnosis: Child abuse. It wasn’t — but CPS took the baby anyway.

An investigation by @NBCNews and @HoustonChron:
nbcnews.to/2AtapwW (1/12)
@HoustonChron The investigation reveals a legal and medical system that sometimes struggles to differentiate accidental injuries from abuse, particularly in cases involving children too young to describe what happened to them. (2/12)
@HoustonChron Physicians intent on protecting the most vulnerable in some instances have overstated the reliability of their findings, using terms such as “100 percent” and “certain” to describe conclusions that usually cannot be proven with absolute confidence. (3/12)
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A letter by a top adviser to Education Sec. Betsy DeVos reveals how the department has prioritized student loan servicers over student borrowers, consumer advocates say.

Reporting by @erikjhortiz. nbcnews.to/2kJFvvP (1/8)
@erikjhortiz The advocates say the Education Dept. is declining to turn over information to law enforcement in multiple states investigating student loan servicers, some accused of illegally exploiting borrowers. (2/8)
"After nearly a year of hiding the truth, Sec. DeVos' Dept. of Education finally admitted that it is interfering with law enforcement in order to protect predatory student loan servicers ... instead of making sure student loan borrowers get treated fairly," Sen. Murray says (3/8)
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More than a week after Hurricane Dorian flattened the neighborhood known as the Mudd in the Abaco Islands, efforts have shifted to recovering the remains of those killed, with teams marking homes with the letter “D” for the deceased inside. nbcnews.to/34GBytZ (1/6)
“In this location we have not found any rescues, it has been all recoveries,” says Rutledge Rogers, a Florida firefighter, who was assisting with recovery efforts.

“All the intelligence that we’ve been getting is that this is the area that did get hit the hardest.” (2/6)
The number of confirmed dead rose to 50 on Monday, with 42 of those deaths occurring in the Abaco Islands, but fears remained that the number would continue to rise.

It’s unclear how many people remain missing. (3/6)
Read 6 tweets
For at least the past 3 years, more police officers across the nation have died by suicide than in the line of duty. nbcnews.com/news/us-news/p… (1/8)
One night in 2006, Lt. Ed Rediske slumped in a chair. It was easier for him to imagine ending his life than it was to ask for help: "I didn't feel like I could cope."
Weeks earlier, an armed man killed two Fairfax Co. officers. One was a friend. (2/8)
"The biggest issue is finding a way to get officers who are feeling troubled to come forward," says John Violanti, a professor at Univ. of Buffalo.
"You couple that issue with our societal stigma of mental illness, that if you're mentally ill you're defective in some way." (3/8)
Read 8 tweets
For at least the past 3 years, more police officers across the nation have died by suicide than in the line of duty. nbcnews.to/2m675nm (1/8)
One night in 2006, Lt. Ed Rediske slumped in a chair. It was easier for him to imagine ending his life than it was to ask for help: "I didn't feel like I could cope."

Weeks earlier, an armed man killed two Fairfax Co. officers. One was a friend. (2/8)
"The biggest issue is finding a way to get officers who are feeling troubled to come forward," says John Violanti, a professor at Univ. of Buffalo.

"You couple that issue with our societal stigma of mental illness, that if you're mentally ill you're defective in some way." (3/8)
Read 8 tweets
More than 100 rural hospitals have closed in the US since 2010 and another 430 are at risk of closing, which a new study says could have life-or-death implications for rural communities.

Reporting by @PhilMcCausland: nbcnews.com/news/us-news/r… (1/5)
@PhilMcCausland Researchers examined 92 rural hospital closings in California from 1995 to 2011. They found that while the closings of urban hospitals had no impact on their surrounding communities, rural closings caused their populations to see mortality rates rise 5.9%. (2/5)
@PhilMcCausland “Rural closings increase travel times for patients, and lead to outmigration of health care professionals post-closure, severely dismembering patient access to care and exacerbating social disparities in health outcomes,” researchers write in their study. (3/5)
Read 5 tweets
More Republican women than ever are planning to run for office.

"They're tired of being quiet, and they know they have a lot to give," says Patti Russo, who's helped run the Women's Campaign School at Yale University for more than two decades. nbcnews.to/326AdKZ (1/5)
Valerie Ramirez Mukherjee of Illinois, an investment manager who is pro-choice, pro-gay rights and concerned about climate change, is running for a seat in Congress straight away: "We need to have new role models in the party." (2/5)
Anne Smith, who left a foreign affairs job with the federal government and now cares for her 20-month-old twins, is plotting a run for a seat in the Virginia General Assembly: The GOP is "losing women voters, and it doesn't seem to be doing anything about it." (3/5)
Read 5 tweets
At reproductive health clinics across the US, many leaders say they were faced with an impossible choice as recipients of grants from Title X, the federal family planning program that provides affordable birth control. nbcnews.to/2Z9H750 (1/7)
They could follow a new Trump admin. rule that bars Title X grantees from referring patients to abortion providers, or they could refuse to comply, giving up millions in annual funding. (2/7)
The funds Title X grantees receive pay for reproductive services for millions of women, for everything from pregnancy tests to cervical cancer screenings. nbcnews.to/2Z9H750 (3/7)
Read 7 tweets
By the numbers, there is no bigger advocate of President Trump on Facebook than The Epoch Times. But despite its growing reach, little is publicly known about the precise ownership, origins or influences of the nonprofit news outlet. nbcnews.to/2Ze7v99 (1/8)
The Epoch Times has spent more than $1.5 million on pro-Trump advertisements in the last 6 months — more than any organization outside of the Trump campaign.

High engagement has made it a Trump family favorite and a key component of the president's re-election campaign. (2/8)
At the same time, its network of news sites and YouTube channels has made it a powerful conduit for conspiracy theories, including anti-vaccination propaganda and QAnon, to reach the main stream. nbcnews.to/2Ze7v99 (3/8)
Read 8 tweets
By the numbers, there is no bigger advocate of President Trump on Facebook than The Epoch Times. But despite its growing reach, little is publicly known about the precise ownership, origins or influences of the nonprofit news outlet. nbcnews.to/2Ze7v99 (1/8)
The Epoch Times has spent more than $1.5 million on pro-Trump advertisements in the last 6 months — more than any organization outside of the Trump campaign.

High engagement has made it a Trump family favorite and a key component of the president's re-election campaign. (2/8)
At the same time, its network of news sites and YouTube channels has made it a powerful conduit for conspiracy theories, including anti-vaccination propaganda and QAnon, to reach the main stream. nbcnews.to/2Ze7v99 (3/8)
Read 8 tweets
Hurricane Maria destroyed 85% of coffee farm harvests when it ravaged the island in September 2017, says Puerto Rico’s secretary of agriculture.

Right before the storm, farmers were expecting the best harvest in 10 years, he says.

nbcnews.to/2Z6toHw (1/7)
“To see all of the work, effort and money that you put in, just gone in a couple of hours, it was tough,” says coffee farmer Iris Jeannette, adding that she lost over 20,000 trees and more than $100,000 in labor and investments. nbcnews.to/2Z6toHw (2/7)
Coffee plants take longer than other crops to recover. After Maria, the Hispanic Federation, a nonprofit advocacy organization, decided to create a 5-year coffee initiative, in collaboration with Lin-Manuel Miranda’s family to help revitalize the island's coffee sector. (3/7)
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A majority of US states issue marriage licenses to teens as young as 16 or 17, and a handful allow children as young as 14 to marry.

13 states have no age limit.

Just 2 states ban the practice of child marriage outright.

Story by @DartDClark: nbcnews.to/2H3yQoh (1/8)
@DartDClark Legal loopholes have allowed the marriages to continue, lawmakers and activists say.

Experts say such marriages typically ensnare young girls under pressure from parents or predatory adults. Studies show marrying young places social, educational & economic strains on youth (2/8)
@DartDClark “You have to be 21 to drink. You have to be 16 to operate a car. Why on earth are the ages lower to enter into a lifelong commitment such as marriage? It does not make any sense,” says Genevieve Meyer, who was forced into marriage at 15 years old. nbcnews.to/2H3yQoh (3/8)
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Kashmir has for decades been at the center of a violent tug-of-war between India and Pakistan, two nuclear-armed neighbors partitioned by the British and given independence in 1947. nbcnews.to/2KEgsmN (1/7)
Both countries claim all of Kashmir but each only governs part of it after fighting wars and countless skirmishes over the decades. (2/7)
The part that India controls, the state of Jammu and Kashmir, has grappled with a violent insurgency since the 80s. The separatists in this Muslim-majority region see the control by Hindu-majority India as an illegitimate occupation. nbcnews.to/2KEgsmN (3/7)
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Russia-linked Twitter accounts have been spreading videos of confrontations between white people and minorities to stoke racial tensions in America, according to Clemson University researchers. (1/6) nbcnews.to/2yMqvRl
The accounts frame the content as explicit discrimination, use emotionally-loaded language, and give calls to action, including encouraging people to publish the participants’ personal information — a strategy known as “doxxing.” (2/6)
Some common patterns followed by these Russian-linked Twitter accounts included giving the objects of the outrage alliterative nicknames, like “Taco Truck Tammy” or “Basketball Becky,” or giving a call to action, like “Twitter, do your thing.” (3/6) nbcnews.to/2yMqvRl
Read 6 tweets
If climate change is left unchecked, rising temperatures, extreme weather and land degradation could trigger a global food crisis, according to a new UN report. nbcnews.to/2MappHF (1/6)
If average global temperatures rise 2°C over the pre-industrial average — something previous reports have suggested could happen by the end of the century — the risk of food supply instabilities “are projected to be very high,” the report says. (2/6)
A key way food production could be affected is extreme weather events, which can disrupt crops or growing seasons.
Scientists are already seeing some of this play out. Much of the Midwest saw heavy rain and floods this spring, which delayed farmers' planting. (3/6)
Read 6 tweets
.@maddow looks at the history of landmark cases in which victims of violence by white supremacists acquired money or assets from the groups that victimized them, shutting them down. (1/8) on.msnbc.com/2MFc6i9
@maddow “The title to that 7,000 square foot national Ku Klux Klan headquarters in Tuscaloosa, Alabama…the ownership of that headquarters was signed over to Michael Donald’s mother.” - @maddow says of 1981 murder of black man by white supremacists (2/8) on.msnbc.com/2MFc6i9
@maddow “That case did set a precedent that was used by other victims of Klan violence, and other victims of white nationalist, white supremacist, neo-Nazi violence.” - @maddow (3/8) on.msnbc.com/2MFc6i9
Read 8 tweets

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