This is going viral because of the comic relief. But I want to be clear that parents are being put in an impossible situation now and it will derail entire careers, especially for moms. Some thoughts... #SciMomJourneys
Moms in science are used to juggling parent and work duties. Here's a time I gave public comment at the @EPA with my one-month-old while I was on maternity leave. blog.ucsusa.org/gretchen-goldm…
The pandemic is exacerbating inequities and struggles that parents--especially moms and especially moms of color--have long felt. Our entire support network has been ripped from under us. Here's something I wrote in @sciam with @500womensci: blogs.scientificamerican.com/voices/scienti…
Parents shouldn't be gaslit into thinking they can hack their way out of this. We can create a facade of professional Zoom backgrounds but the problem is much bigger and it shouldn't be on us to fix it.
Our political leaders, our institutions, our employers must step up and ensure that parents in STEM and other fields aren't taking career penalties. Here's a set of recommendations for employers I wrote with @500womensci: static1.squarespace.com/static/582cce4…
In the meantime, shout out to my fellow moms getting it done, with or without the support we need.

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More from @GretchenTG

19 May
New @UCSUSA analysis: The public is hearing less from CDC scientists and more from the White House than in past infectious disease outbreaks. And it is costing the public. Here's some key finding from @anita_desikan's and my new work. ucsusa.org/resources/let-…
First, you might expect more communication for bigger outbreaks, but that hasn't been the case. Even though COVID cases have far outnumbered past epidemics, we've only heard as much from the CDC as we did on SARS (which only had 8 US cases)
All those White House-led COVID briefings? Those aren't normal. Historically, CDC-led briefings have been the primary source of crisis communication during epidemics. Instead, under the Trump administration, CDC expertise is taking a back seat to White House communications.
Read 7 tweets
23 Apr
We couldn't predict #COVID19, but CDC scientists did predict a pandemic and our lack of preparedness. My new @PLOSONE paper with @UCSJacob has important findings that inform decisionmakers actions now. Here's some key points from our paper released today. journals.plos.org/plosone/articl…
In 2018, we worked with @IowaStateU to ask 63,000 scientists at the @CDCgov, @USEPA, @Interior and other federal science agencies about scientific integrity. We learned a lot that could have predicted the many science policy challenges the nation now faces.
More than any other agency, CDC respondents reported White House interference as a top barrier to science-based decisions—an alarming finding in the midst of a global pandemic where CDC scientists’ ability to conduct science is an immediate matter of life and death.
Read 17 tweets
4 Mar
They tried to bury the EPA science rule by releasing it late Super Tuesday. Little did they know, I am a science policy nerd willing to dive deep into their lengthy nonsensical proposals in short order. My take on EPA's new "transparency" rule: blog.ucsusa.org/gretchen-goldm…
The supplemental proposal makes the rule even worse. The original draft was vague. It is now crystal clear that this rule will devastate the EPA's ability to conduct and use science on everything from air pollution protections, to water quality standards, to pesticide regulation.
The scientific community has voiced again and again concerns about the rule's unnecessary and dangerous restrictions on EPA's use of health studies. The new proposal does nothing to address these concerns about protecting the privacy of health data.
Read 8 tweets
26 Sep 19
This is big. It's never been done before. And I'm excited to share it with you today. We are pushing back on the sidelining of air pollution science at the EPA in a monumental way. A THREAD theguardian.com/environment/20…
On October 10-11, we will be bringing together the very group of science advisers that EPA leaders disbanded a year ago--to the day--to ensure independent science advice informs the particulate pollution standard. blog.ucsusa.org/gretchen-goldm…
20 members of the disbanded Particulate Matter Review Panel will come together on October 11 to discuss the science and policy around particulate matter and public health, and make recommendations to the EPA, even though its leaders tried to stop it.
Read 11 tweets
11 Sep 19
If you find yourself newly interested in NOAA, scientific integrity, and how decisionmakers are held accountable for following the science-based missions of agencies. Here's some background. There are reasons #sharpiegate is playing out this way.
Before 2011, most federal agencies didn't have much in terms of scientific integrity protections for staff. The Bush II administration laid bare this glaring vulnerability, with abuses of science across the government from ideological and financial forces ucsusa.org/our-work/cente…
As a result, @UCSUSA and others in the scientific community insisted scientific integrity be a priority under the Obama administration and that the policies be strong. By the end of the Obama administration some 28 agencies had scientific integrity policies on the books.
Read 13 tweets
7 Sep 19
This might look like another layer of #SharpieGate, but NOAA leadership trading scientific integrity for political appeasement is a much bigger deal and one that threatens the safety of the nation.
Employees of @NWS work around the clock, in every corner of the country, to keep the nation safe from hurricanes, tornadoes, heatwaves, and floodwaters. Communication with the public is a crucial part of that work.
@NWS @NWSBirmingham meteorologists were doing this vital job when @NOAA leaders betrayed them. Adding to the disappointment, this is the same Birmingham office that won national awards for their tireless work to save lives during the historic 2011 tornado outbreak.
Read 10 tweets

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