Cassandra Stubbs Profile picture
Day job: ending the death penalty with the ACLU Capital Punishment Project. Mom, sometimes runner, midwesterner living in the south. Views are all my own.
13 Jan
1/ The execution of #LisaMontgomery would have been unjust at any time, but the fact that it was allowed to go forward last night wasn’t just tragic —it was a staggering violation of our constitution and values.
2/Lisa suffered horrific sexual violence and torture and deserved our mercy, not a punishment judged immoral by most of the world.
3/ In these last distorted days of Trump’s failed presidency, with impeachment proceedings underway and elected leaders from both parties speaking out about the failed coup, Trump didn’t even bother to respond to her clemency petition.
Read 12 tweets
12 Jan
DOJ's continued pursuant of federal executions this week is morally indefensible. The ABA, AMA, and retired Indiana
corrections officials have all asked Rosen to postpone because we know the executions are likely to act as superspreaders of COVID-19. aclu.org/other/federal-…
Each of the three executions set this week highlight the need to abolish, not carry out, executions. #LisaMontgomery suffered unimaginable trauma and violence, leading to her mental illness. Today she lacks a rational understanding of her execution. huffpost.com/entry/lisa-mon…
#CoreyJohnson has intellectual disability. He is one of four Black men President Trump is trying to execute in the period between when he lost his election and leaves office. nytimes.com/2021/01/11/opi…
Read 4 tweets
5 Jun 20
Today, the North Carolina Supreme Court ruled that the NC legislature could not retroactively repeal the Racial Justice Act for #deathrow prisoners who had filed claims. This is a big deal, and here’s why. (1/)
With today’s ruling, everyone on death row in North Carolina who filed a claim under the Racial Justice Act will have the opportunity to prove racial bias in their cases. Anyone who proves racial bias will be removed from death row and resentenced to life without parole. (2/)
It means that North Carolina can keep the promise it made when it passed the RJA in 2009 to no longer tolerate racial discrimination in death penalty cases. (3/)
Read 14 tweets