Omar Wasow Profile picture
Asst Prof, Pomona Politics. I study protests, statistics & race: 1/ Agenda Seeding https://t.co/HQAGSfqMM9 2/ Race as a Bundle of Sticks https://t.co/PuFZmnnVcH
Joshua Cypess Profile picture PSBlaw Profile picture Sandra Jo Streeter Profile picture Puneet Kollipara Profile picture Jodi Jacobson 🩸🦷 #BlackLivesMatter Profile picture 8 added to My Authors
29 Jul
~27% of African Americans in Texas are vaccinated. CDC suggests national numbers are similarly low despite a 3X rate of hospitalization due to Covid compared to Whites and a 2X rate of death. Where is the reporting that goes deeper than “Tuskegee” to make sense of the disparity?
Medical anthropologists conducted 200 in-depth interviews and found ”Our participant testimony shows that many unvaccinated people are not ‘vaccine hesitant’ but rather ’vaccine impeded.’” theconversation.com/us-black-and-l…
”Christina, in San Diego, cannot get vaccinated, she said, because she has no one to care for her babies should she fall ill with side effects. Her husband, similarly, can’t take time off from his job – ’It doesn’t work that way.’” theconversation.com/us-black-and-l…
Read 12 tweets
27 Jul
A good way to understand Trump’s coalition through a cross-national lens: @Pavithra_Suri explains how in India ”status politics enables anti-redistributive coalitions. Poor and wealthy voters unite to defend status interests, and protect institutions key to maintaining status.”
Two implications of @Pavithra_Suri’s analysis: 1/ egalitarian-oriented pushes will tend to generate hierarchy restoring counter-mobilizations. 2/ Egalitarian-oriented coalitions should think more about how to affirm some forms of symbolic status compatible with rest of agenda.
.@TheoLandsman rightly raises concern that it’s ”Hard to know in the moment which symbols are benign and which are culturally toxic.” The Olympics might offer one example of a form of reasonably benign nationalism that can unify without dangerous spillovers.
Read 6 tweets
25 Jul
Bob Moses helped inspire my father to travel from Los Angeles to Mississippi to fight for voting rights. Moses also helped train a generation of activists on how to use bottom-up, strategic civil disobedience to fight for human rights. My dad just texted me: ”A great man.” RIP.
In 1964, Bob Moses was a ”shy, bespectacled math teacher” who guided Freedom Summer, ”busing hundreds of college students into backwoods Mississippi to register black voters. ‘The purpose,’ Moses says, ’was to break open Mississippi as a closed society.‘” nytimes.com/1993/02/21/mag…
In early 1990s I met Bob Moses through The Algebra Project.

Moses said, ”The question we asked then was: What are the skills people have to master to open the doors to citizenship? Now math literacy holds the key.”

That work helped inspire how I teach. nytimes.com/1993/02/21/mag…
Read 11 tweets
22 Jul
“Kelli Dillon was sterilized without her knowledge in a California prison in *2001*.” npr.org/2021/07/21/101…
”In the early-to-mid 1900s, California forcibly sterilized tens of thousands of women and men as part of a eugenics program. The state banned forced sterilizations in 1979 but, between 2006 & 2010, still sterilized ~150 incarcerated women without required state approvals.”
”Kelli Dillon was 24 years old when she underwent an abdominal surgery and a simple procedure to address some possible cysts. Afterwards, she began to experience many strange symptoms which she finally learned were symptoms of menopause…” npr.org/2021/07/21/101…
Read 6 tweets
20 Jul
California developer planned 18 new homes for low-income families. Original build cost specced at $414K per apt. However, ”political, economic and bureaucratic forces converged.” Project shrunk in size by nearly half and build cost swelled to 1.1M per apt. latimes.com/homeless-housi…
”California has the nation’s highest poverty rate when housing and other living expenses are factored in. Rising rents and skyrocketing home prices are a growing threat to the state, widening income equality and eroding economic mobility.” latimes.com/opinion/story/…
”California poverty rates are due to high rent costs. Under rule that rent shouldn’t exceed 30% of income, KPCC reports minimum wage workers should pay ~$546 in rent. Yet, a two-bedroom apartment in the most populated areas of CA costs more than $1,500.” unitedwayla.org/en/news-resour…
Read 10 tweets
17 Jul
How did a sleepy Salvadoran beach town come to be known as ”Bitcoin Beach”?

”An anonymous US donor gave a small local charity $100,000 to be distributed directly to residents of El Zonte with the aim of kickstarting a local bitcoin economy.”

Listen: latimes.com/podcasts/story…
”Two years after a $100,000 donation, El Zonte is known as Bitcoin Beach — one of the only places on the planet where people can use cryptocurrency for routine transactions such as buying groceries or paying bills — and bitcoin fever has swept the nation.” latimes.com/world-nation/s…
When older people weren’t interested in bitcoin, ”they started to pay teenagers in bitcoin to work as lifeguards or pick up trash along the shore. It gave out bitcoin to students who earned good grades in school and to families weathering the pandemic.” latimes.com/world-nation/s…
Read 7 tweets
16 Jul
Study ”analyzed body camera footage from more than 100 police officers and found a subtle but clear pattern: During traffic stops, officers spoke to Black men in a less respectful and less friendly tone than they did to white men.” latimes.com/science/story/…
”Compared with white residents, Black community members were 57% less likely to hear the officer use words such as ‘sir,’ ‘ma’am’ and ‘thank you’ and 61% more likely to hear words such as ‘dude’ and ‘bro’ and commands such as ‘hands on the wheel.’” latimes.com/science/story/…
”On a scale of 1 to 6, the average score of officer tone toward white drivers was 3.72 (slightly positive) while average score toward black drivers was 3.5 (neither positive nor negative). ‘They’re not huge…but there are differences that can be detected.” latimes.com/science/story/…
Read 7 tweets
14 Jul
In 1964, my father went to Mississippi to register voters as part of Freedom Summer. Though he made it home, others like Goodman, Cheney and Schwerner were murdered. Today, @NPR interviewed my father & me about how the fight for voting rights continues. npr.org/2021/07/14/101…
To this day, I can’t look at the photos of Andrew Goodman, James Cheney and Michael Schwerner without getting choked up. The national Republican assault on voting rights is not just about policy or politics, for me it’s deeply personal.
My whole life I’ve had a profound sense of gratitude to the civil rights activists of my parents era for their persevering fight to ensure a kind of intergenerational inheritance: an America that might finally live up to its promise of being a true multiracial democracy.
Read 7 tweets
12 Jul
Political violence typically describes events like assassinations. Across US, though, we’re seeing tactics like violent threats, constant harassment and dangerous disinformation used to chase election officials and educators out of office. What to call this kind of intimidation?
Study finds ”17% of local election officials in US have faced threats because of their job and 32% have ‘felt unsafe because of their job as a local election official.’” The efforts apparently aim to ”get officials to resign or even flip an election.” vox.com/22533994/trump…
”Ms. Moritz is one casualty of a year in which election officials were repeatedly threatened, scapegoated and left exhausted — all while managing a historically bitter presidential vote during a pandemic.” nytimes.com/2021/07/02/us/…
Read 14 tweets
10 Jul
After 20 years, Biden said of Afghanistan “it’s time to end the forever war.”

After 50 years of ”war on drugs” though, Biden is still keen to fight.

The irony?

The US drug war fuels the illicit market that has put billions into the Taliban insurgency. newyorker.com/magazine/2007/…
In 2007, ”Afghanistan now supplies more than 92% of world’s opium. More than half the country’s annual GDP, some $3.1 billion, is believed to come from drug trade, and narcotics officials believe that part of the money is funding the Taliban insurgency.” newyorker.com/magazine/2007/…
In 2014, ”Afghan opium cultivation hits record high, fueling Taliban insurgency. A $7.6 billion US counternarcotics effort has failed, and hopes of reversing poppy growth have dimmed.” america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/…
Read 7 tweets
10 Jul
Study of Black and Latino adults with asthma found that during the pandemic, ”The number of attacks the participants suffered at home really was dropping. It fell by 40 percent after the onset of the pandemic.” Why? theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Study didn’t find a link with air pollution. ”People who normally worked outside home, however, had bigger decreases in asthma attacks than those who worked at home (65% vs 23%), perhaps because they weren’t being exposed to viruses and irritants at work.” theatlantic.com/health/archive…
”It’s long been routine for doctors to question parents of kids with asthma about dust mites or cockroaches or smoking in the home…the unstated implication when you’re asking about triggers like that is that those are causes of your child’s asthma.” theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Read 4 tweets
4 Jul
In July of 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered one of the greatest speeches in US history. Today it’s often presented in abridged form, though, and skips what seems like a long-winded introduction. If you read the intro closely, however, there’s an ingenious structure. THREAD👇🏽
Douglass begins the speech quite conventionally with self-deprecating remarks and then shifts to honoring his audience & the exceptional accomplishment of the American people. July 4th, he says “is what the Passover was to the emancipated people of God.” 2/
In Douglass’ opening narrative, the colonists are courageous and England is despotic. “Feeling themselves harshly and unjustly treated by the home government, your fathers, like men of honesty, and men of spirit, earnestly sought redress.” 3/
Read 21 tweets
29 Jun
The rise of ‘the squad’ “has fed a perception among some Democrats that the party’s left flank is disproportionately Black, Hispanic and Asian American.

But the opposite is true, as the Pew data makes clear.”
nytimes.com/2021/06/29/bri…
“Black people talk about politics in more practical and everyday terms,” said @hakeemjefferson , an assistant professor at Stanford who studies the political views of Black people. “The median Black voter is not AOC and is actually closer to Eric Adams.” nytimes.com/2021/06/26/us/…
For statistical minorities with a long history of maltreatment by the majority, voting is first and foremost an act of self-preservation but it is also an act that demands acute awareness of the limits of what the majority will support.
Read 5 tweets
26 Jun
“Early 20th-century engineers thought reinforced concrete structures would last a very long time – perhaps 1,000 years. In reality, their life span is more like 50-100 years, and sometimes less. Deterioration can begin in as little as 10 years.” theconversation.com/the-problem-wi…
“Coastal Florida’s hurricanes, storm surges and the corrosive salty air can penetrate concrete and rust the rebar and steel beams inside.” nytimes.com/2021/06/26/us/…
“When embedded in concrete, steel is hidden but secretly active. Moisture entering through tiny cracks creates an electrochemical reaction. The rebar forms a ‘battery’ that powers the transformation of iron into rust.” theconversation.com/the-problem-wi…
Read 10 tweets
19 Jun
I hope for all of us delta variant doesn’t produce another deadly wave. Polarization of Covid already means some partisans opt-out of vaccination and opt-in to higher rates of infection. If trend continues, we may witness a strange new form of self-imposed, low-grade politicide.
“The delta variant may pose a triple threat. It’s far more contagious than any other variant recorded to date. It appears to be more deadly to those infected, and it appears to cause more infections among people with immunity than many other variants.” washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/…
Read 11 tweets
16 Jun
The current panic over ”critical race theory” is mostly an elite project of think tanks, elected officials and media figures to gin-up fear. That said, it’s also useful to consider why there’s an appetite for anti-”CRT” in part of the mass public.👇🏽
Put simply, a lot of Americans—mostly White, older, politically moderate or conservative—appear to harbor a significant fear of what post-Floyd ”racial reckoning” means for them. Could you get fired for saying the wrong thing? Are your kids being taught their race is ”evil”? 2/
To be clear, these are not entirely unfounded concerns. Data scientist David Shor was baselessly accused of “anti-Blackness” simply for tweeting about my research on 1960s protests. Days later he was out of a job. 3/ nymag.com/intelligencer/…
Read 17 tweets
14 Jun
The way to understand the panic over critical race theory is as a reactionary counter-mobilization. After George Floyd’s murder & ensuing wave of protests, a focus on racism in America took on new urgency. Fearmongering over CRT is largely a project to delegitimize that movement.
It’s important to distinguish between a debate and a panic. Robust debates about scholarship, curriculum & pedagogy are routine in the academy and in American society more generally. That one idea poses a mortal danger to the national fabric is akin to a modern Red Scare. 2/
There are, of course, reasonable critiques of critical race theory just as there are of any set of ideas. The ”CRT” discussed in GOP legislatures and on rightwing talk shows, though, is a bogeyman. It’s politically useful hysteria. 3/ HT @TheStateofBall Image
Read 17 tweets
13 Jun
Racial division defines much of our national politics yet NY mayoral contest has seen relatively little divisive rhetoric. Why? Some of it is just NY but ranked choice voting likely helps, too. Each candidate must win competitors ethnic blocs which discourages appeals to bigotry.
Ranked choice voting and other alternatives also encourage more diverse pools. One study found ”California cities which adopted RCV saw an increase in percentage of candidates of color and increases in probability of women & women of color winning office.” fairvote.org/research_rcvre…
FairVote study on RCV: ”Candidates of color see strongest gains in districts with majority of voters of color… This suggests candidates are earning votes outside of their own racial and ethnic groups and building broad support across their districts.” fairvote.org/report_rcv_ben…
Read 6 tweets
12 Jun
Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s anti-vax crusade hits a new low. Misinformation ”documentary” invokes real history of medical racism to persuade African Americans ”the same thing that happened in the 1930s during the eugenics movement” is happening now with Covid. npr.org/sections/healt…
”The film draws a line from the real and disturbing history of racism and atrocities in the medical field—such as the Tuskegee syphilis study—to interviews with anti-vaccine activists who warn communities of color to be suspicious of modern-day vaccines.” npr.org/sections/healt…
Medical historian Naomi Rogers says ”the film uses many of the ideas that she holds ‘passionately, like health disparities, fighting racism in health, working against discrimination, and it’s been twisted for the purposes of this anti-vax movement.‘” npr.org/sections/healt…
Read 4 tweets
8 Jun
Now picture what car exhaust does to your lungs.
“New study estimates air pollution from burning fossil fuels caused 8.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2018 alone. That’s almost one out of every five deaths that year.“ yaleclimateconnections.org/2021/04/air-po…
”Racial-ethnic minorities in the United States are exposed to disproportionately high levels of ambient fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5), the largest environmental cause of human mortality.” via @awgaffney advances.sciencemag.org/content/7/18/e…
Read 7 tweets
7 Jun
In Portland, ”housing projects are 20 times more likely than other projects to face design appeals.” sightline.org/2021/06/04/por…
”Why do some projects draw more opposition, and more legal challenges, than others? A national survey found a clear trend. The closer a proposed apartment building is to the place a homeowner lives, the likelier they are to oppose its existence.” sightline.org/2021/06/04/por…
Housing equity is often defined solely in terms of rich and poor but we should also think of equity in terms of current residents vs future residents. NIMBY opposition to new development limits opportunity and social mobility for potential newcomers. nytimes.com/2016/07/04/bus…
Read 10 tweets