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23 Feb
Plans to overhaul American energy will come before Congress in the next few months. What unfolds will set the course in America for the next decade—and quite possibly beyond. Thread 👇 econ.st/2ZSGk6N
Last week America rejoined the Paris agreement. But as one of the world's largest emitters of greenhouse gases, it must do much more econ.st/3bvuGnr
Joe Biden wants America's net greenhouse-gas emissions to reach zero by 2050 and the electricity sector to be emissions-free by 2035. Delaying action to 2030 would nearly double the cost of reaching these targets econ.st/3bvuGnr
Read 12 tweets
19 Jan
Today is Donald Trump's last full day in office. He has made The Economist's cover many times in the past five years. Our editors have picked some of the most notable. Take a look back at his presidency in this thread 👇 econ.st/38VQuZy
When Mr Trump announced his candidacy for the presidency in June 2015, many found it hard to take him seriously. But the possibility that he might win was not a joke. From September 5th 2015 econ.st/2XX20xk
When Mr Trump won the presidency, an era of uncertainty beckoned. From November 12th 2016 econ.st/2M2oWIU
Read 15 tweets
15 Jan
Today Wikipedia celebrates its 20th birthday. But how much do you really know about the crowdsourced encyclopedia? Test your knowledge (and no peeking ahead at the answers!) 👇
Wikipedia is the most-read reference work ever. How many page views does the site attract per month?
Read how the site, once treated as a bit of a joke, came to be taken seriously econ.st/2LKm3MT
Read 13 tweets
24 Dec 20
📮 As well as laughs—intentional and otherwise—Christmas newsletters provide a rich social history. A festive thread (1/10) economist.com/christmas-spec…
The oldest archived example of a Christmas newsletter was penned by Marie Harris in 1948, detailing her family’s move to a rambling old farmhouse in Oregon (2/10)
After the second world war, Christmas newsletters emerged as a medium on both sides of the Atlantic (3/10)
Read 10 tweets
25 Nov 20
What will 2021 hold for American politics? There are a few things to watch out for. Thread 👇 #TheWorldIn2021 (1/11) econ.st/33vdX0H
The Biden administration will take rapid steps to rebuild America’s Trump-bruised institutions, its economy and its foreign policy (2/11) econ.st/3nT7e8p
But the 2020 presidential election will not reset America's relations with China. The Biden team wants to see a fitter, smarter America pick fights with China more carefully—then train hard to win each one (3/11) econ.st/33eOFDB
Read 11 tweets
23 Nov 20
Covid-19 has changed what people value around the world. How has that affected prices in big cities? Thread (1/9)👇 econ.st/3kWDLZs Image
The index compares prices across nearly 140 items in 133 cities (2/9)
Paris, Hong Kong and Zurich are tied for first place. Living costs there are 3% higher than in New York, the index’s benchmark city (3/9) economist.com/graphic-detail…
Read 9 tweets
20 Nov 20
Britain’s government isn’t working well. But Boris Johnson’s party has the wrong ideas for how to fix it. Thread 👇 (1/9) econ.st/3kON2mb Image
A Conservative counter-revolution is underway against restraints imposed on ministers in the past 40 years. Those involved want to unchain Britain's executive, limiting judicial power and reforming Whitehall (2/9) econ.st/2KnHSAZ
Dominic Cummings, Boris Johnson's ousted chief adviser, was an architect of this transformation. He reckoned the British state was rotten and the only solution was to tear it down and start again. Instead, as @1843mag reports, he lost his job (3/9) econ.st/2UKQsf8
Read 9 tweets
3 Nov 20
Which races to watch, the role of postal votes and what happens if Donald Trump declares victory prematurely—our overview for election night. THREAD (1/11) econ.st/2HQyJQL
The state that matters most on Tuesday night is Florida. Joe Biden and Donald Trump are neck-and-neck there (2/11) econ.st/3kVjG6y
Other races to watch closely are: North Carolina, Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan (3/11)
Read 11 tweets
16 Oct 20
The persecution of the Uyghurs is a crime against humanity. The Economist and @1843mag spoke to Uyghurs whose lives have been torn apart. A thread: 👇 econ.trib.al/cozmUki
Documents seen by The Economist show that China’s campaign to crush the Uyghurs, a Muslim ethnic-minority group, has terrorised hundreds of thousands of children econ.trib.al/PSAQk9E
According to government records, in 2018 more than 9,500 children aged between 7 and 12 in Yarkand, a Uyghur-dominated county, at one point had one or both parents detained by the state econ.trib.al/VQGFPB6
Read 11 tweets
15 Oct 20
China's persecution of the Uyghurs is a crime against humanity. It is also the gravest example of a worldwide attack on human rights. Our cover this week econ.trib.al/C2MimPa
Official local-level reports, seen by The Economist, provide damning evidence that China's persecution of the Uyghurs has terrorised hundreds of thousands of children econ.trib.al/5DEMZMS
Thousands of miles from Xinjiang, Uyghurs still live in fear of the Chinese state econ.trib.al/MFbZ7l1 From
@1843mag
Read 4 tweets
1 Oct 20
Covid-19 has now killed one million people around the world. How has the pandemic progressed—and where is it headed? Thread 👇 (1/13) econ.trib.al/KMbIfI2
The number of people known to have been infected with covid-19 now stands at more than 33m. But the true tally of cases and deaths is likely to be higher (2/13) econ.trib.al/2KKABCF
A better, if still imperfect, sense of the scale of infections can be gleaned from “serosurveys”, which look for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in blood samples (3/13) econ.trib.al/KMbIfI2
Read 13 tweets
25 Sep 20
We have launched our forecasting models for America’s Senate and House races in November. A thread 👇 (1/10) econ.trib.al/57uJi1I
Our House and Senate models are updated daily as more data become available, and will conduct 4.7m simulated elections every day until the vote. Here’s how it works (2/10) econ.trib.al/gUuPh3R
Right now, our model thinks the Democrats are likely to win a majority in the Senate (3/10)
Read 10 tweets
8 Sep 20
Dementia affects more than 50m people globally, a number that is rising fast. The world is not ready to cope. Thread 👇(1/10) econ.trib.al/G1jWT84 Image
Some 82m people will have dementia by 2030 and 152m by 2050. Set against the size of the world’s population, these numbers may seem manageable. That is illusory (2/10) econ.trib.al/fRCauqu Image
Humane care for people with dementia will require vast numbers of people and huge sums of money—the WHO estimates an annual global cost of $2trn by 2030 (3/10) econ.trib.al/fRCauqu
Read 10 tweets
17 Jun 20
You use artificial intelligence (AI) every day, mostly without noticing. It's how you're reading this tweet. But is today's AI technology really that world-changing? Thread 👇 (1/10) econ.trib.al/aECLbIO
In recent years, there has been a new wave of investment and research into AI. According to one prediction, AI will add $16trn to the global economy by 2030 (2/10) econ.trib.al/aECLbIO
Yet for all its strengths, AI also has serious limitations. As this realisation spreads, enthusiasm for the technology is cooling (3/10) econ.trib.al/uVYuDqd
Read 10 tweets
22 Apr 20
We have made our regularly-updated excess-mortality tracker free to read. A thread👇 (1/9) econ.trib.al/Ie6MSY4
At the start of April we analysed mortality data from different regions in Italy, France and Spain. The increases in total mortality in some areas were more than twice the number of deaths officially attributed to covid-19 (2/9) econ.trib.al/JpFzBiw
In many countries the number of deaths in March is much higher than last year. How many of these fatalities could be attributed to covid-19? (3/9)
Read 9 tweets
25 Feb 20
"Mirror worlds"—new dimensions of human life based on and fuelled by data—are bringing about a distinct economy. How will it work? Thread 👇 (1/9) econ.st/38U8dxY
It is estimated that the world will generate about 90 zettabytes of data—19 trn DVDs worth—this year and next. That's more than all data produced since the advent of computers (2/9) econ.st/2wOOG45
Deciding ownership and value of this data is difficult. Some want to treat their data as personal property, while others envision democratically sharing data as a free resource (3/9) econ.st/2PodpCK
Read 9 tweets
7 Oct 19
The history of climate change explained in 6 charts from our climate briefing. A thread economist.com/briefing/2019/…
CO2 emissions across the world are (almost) off the charts
In 1900 burning fossil fuels produced about 2bn tonnes of carbon dioxide. Today, the number is nearly 20 times greater
Read 12 tweets
21 Feb 19
What would a no-deal Brexit mean? We’re looking at its impact on everything from cars to the economy, Ireland to immigration, universities to retailing. Thread 👇
Britain could lose special access to countries with which the EU has signed trade deals, such as Canada, Japan and Mexico. Efforts to secure new bilateral deals are stalling econ.st/2SRzzkx
A no-deal Brexit will cost Ireland almost 4% of GDP over five years, according to the IMF. It is still unclear how a hard border could be avoided econ.st/2SOyA4t
Read 7 tweets
22 Jan 19
Britain’s effort to leave the EU has become the mother of all messes. Here is the saga of the past few years, drawn out. Thread by @KALtoons ✏️1/8
January 2013, David Cameron states his intention renegotiate Britain's relationship with the European Union, and promises to hold an in-out referendum on EU membership 2/8
Nine months after Britons voted to leave the EU, the government triggered Article 50, starting the Brexit process 3/8
Read 8 tweets
24 Jul 18
A universal basic income, or UBI, is a regular, unconditional cash payment to every citizen instead of benefits provided only to some. This thread explores the arguments for and against #OpenFuture 1/15
As a benefit paid to all, a UBI removes the stigma of “being on benefits” and that can only be good for society, writes @NicolaSturgeon 2/15
A basic income would enhance freedom—people must be able to say no to oppressive and exploitative relationships, argues Guy Standing, an economist 3/15
Read 15 tweets