Jemar Tisby Profile picture
Author • PhD Candidate • President @thewitnessbcc • NYTimes Bestseller #ColorofCompromise: https://t.co/hrosaj1rcd • Inquiries: https://t.co/EeIVhufALq
Brian (just one more book) Christensen Profile picture 1 added to My Authors
8 Jul 20
“CRT” is the latest label used to discredit those working for racial justice. Recognize it as a deflection from substantive issues of justice. Then turn the conversation toward the real threat to Christianity in this country: White Christian Nationalism
.@AlsoACarpenter has done thorough takedowns of those who want to use CRT as an epithet. Also see posts in @faithfullymag
For more on White Christian Nationalism read @ndrewwhitehead and @socofthesacred’s book

Taking America Back for God: Christian Nationalism in the United States amazon.com/dp/0190057882/…
Read 6 tweets
26 Jun 20
What stands out in this piece is how sincere people of faith (any of us) can be sincerely wrong. McEnany seems truly convinced she is doing righteous work, but has she ever understood Christianity apart from a culture wars, Religious Right perspective?
theatlantic.com/politics/archi…
What's so difficult about piercing the ideological bubble of the Religious Right is they see all opposition as perspecution and read that into their interpretation of the Bible. They think all the pushback is a sign they're taking the narrow path and suffering as Christ did.
Changing someone's mind is even more difficult when their job relies on stubbornly clinging to erroneous and bigoted beliefs. Exponentially more difficult when you get praise for those views. It's your platform and to give it up would mean giving up influence and Identity.
Read 4 tweets
12 Jun 20
While several states and cities attempt to remove Confederate iconography, let's remember a place that is often overlooked in these conversations...Arkansas.
Look at the flag. Nothing to do with the Confederacy right? Riiight. A little history...
Arkansas did not have an official state flag until 1913 when the Pine Bluff chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution co-sponsored a flag design competition. Willie Hocker's design (left) won, but they added the state name to the final design.
The blue diamond represents Arkansas as the only diamond-producing state in the U.S. The 25 stars mean that AR was the 25th state. The three stars stand for, among other things, each nation that ruled Arkansas: France, Spain, and the U.S.
Read 8 tweets
5 May 20
Not again. Not another Black man, human being, image-bearer of God murdered as a blood sacrifice to the idol of white supremacy. Not caught on video again so his family has to relive the trauma, amplified by a million views and opinions. Not again. Yet again.
#AhmaudArbery
If you’re outraged by the murder, then you need to see the connections. Connections to apoplexy of some about the #1619Project that dares to put white supremacy, racism and chattel slavery as a fundamental and foundational to the American project.
You need to connect this murder, and countless others, to voter suppression, gerrymandering and numerous other tactics designed to deprive Black people of our right to shape this nation’s laws and policies into ones that will protect our lives.
Read 5 tweets
23 Apr 20
While racial and ethnic diversity has become trendy among some in the U.S. Christian church, consider this finding by sociologist Michael Emerson:
70% of all multiracial churches in the U.S. are led by white pastors.
This statistic goes along with another of Emerson's findings:
In multiracial churches where white people are in the majority, the people of color conform more to white norms than the other way around. They have to adopt white ways of thinking and doing.
When it comes to racial diversity in many white evangelical circles the thinking is "they" (i.e. people of color) should come to "us" (white people). Seldom do many seriously entertain the option of going to church comprised of and led by people of color.
Read 7 tweets
23 Dec 19
There’s another threat to Christian Witness besides unbending allegiance to Tr*mp. It’s the attempt by many Christians to appear nonpartisan. I get it. Both major parties have major issues. But prioritizing nonpartisanship leads to: 1) false equivalencies and 2) passivity.
Neither party can make a totalizong claim of being “the Christian party.” But what we’re facing right now is not the traditional set of partisan policy differences. It’s a choice between preserving basic tenets of democracy and submitting to demagoguery. These aren’t the same.
Trying to appear nonpartisan tends to make people passive, too. They don’t want to look like they’re in favor of one party or another so they stay silent or on the sidelines instead of taking firm stances for justice regardless of the party that promotes it.
Read 4 tweets
26 Jun 19
"Christian nationalism operates as a unique and independent ideology that can influence political actions by calling forth a defense of mythological narratives about America’s distinctively Christian heritage and future."
academic.oup.com/socrel/article…
Christian nationalism is a pervasive set of beliefs and ideals that merge American and Christian group memberships...that helped shape the political actions of Americans who viewed a Trump presidency as a defense of the country’s perceived Christian heritage..."
"this brand of religious nationalism appears to be unmoored from traditional Christian ideals and morality, and also tends toward authoritarian figures and righteous indignation."
Read 6 tweets
20 Jun 19
A few more thoughts on James O. Eastland, the Senator from Mississippi of whom Joe Biden (in an effort to highlight political "civility") said, “He never called me ‘boy,’ he always called me ‘son.’”...
Photo: @nytimes
Eastland was literally born on a plantation in Sunflower County. His family employed sharecroppers, the economically exploitative system that took over after the abolition of slavery (Happy be-lated #Juneteenth).
Photo: James O. Eastland Collection, Univ. of Mississippi
He entered the Senate in 1942 and, yes, he was a Democrat. But a southern one--a Dixiecrat. There were intra-party differences, mainly along regional lines and Eastland represented the segregationist section.
Read 8 tweets
20 Apr 19
Lots of well-meaning white Christians ask, “How can our church become more diverse?” But that puts all the emphasis on what happens for a coule hours on a single day of the week. To see integrated churches on Sunday you must live an integrated life Monday through Saturday.
That said, there are still all kinds of reasons for ethnic specific churches from language to refuge from racism. And it’s important to see racial justice as a holistic pursuit, not just something that changes the diversity aesthetic of majority-white churches on Sunday morning.
*couple
Read 3 tweets
18 Apr 18
Is this what the Republican Party stands for and wants to be known for in the 21st century? Taking $250,000 from Memphis as a punitive act for removing representations of racism is simply puerile. 1/x apnews.com/17ec9774415240…
There is plenty to be angry about in our country right now, but the bald bigotry on display by Republicans in the Tennessee legislature is simply galling. The majority of Memphis residents are black. This budget cut and the demographics of that city are not unrelated. 2/x
Remember that legislators have been so recalcitrant about removing Confederate monuments, that Memphis officials had to sell the property to a private business which then removed the monuments under cover of night. 3/x
Read 8 tweets
22 Sep 17
I think we need to be careful of how we respond when people say #Imtired about racism, especially in the church...#thread
Sometimes when you say #Imtired, people wrongly think you’re giving up on the work of building interracial/ethnic relationships altogether
To say #Imtired because of racism does not mean you have abandoned the project of working toward the beloved community. It means it’s hard.
Read 10 tweets