Elinor Karlsson Profile picture
Immigrant. Scientist & artist. Prof at UMass Med & Broad Institute. Rice U alum. Founder of https://t.co/1bunUtLnV5. Will sequence your dog’s DNA ... for science!
24 Jan
Ever shattered an orange using liquid nitrogen? That's how we get DNA out of ticks in our new @FrontiersIn article frontiersin.org/articles/10.33… @UMassMedical @broadinstitute @karlssonlab
We have a lot of ticks. 1000s & 1000s of ticks. People send them to us as part of our #citizenScience #tick disease study ProjectAcari.org. The problem? getting the DNA out.
We want to use high-throughput #DNA sequencing to find out everything we can about each individual #tick - its species, its intestinal #microbiome (they have one too!), and if it carries dangerous pathogens.
Read 20 tweets
14 Jan
#scientist/#artists: can you help? Made 130 new mammal genomes for @genome_gov @scilifelab @broadinstitute #200Mammals project (#opendata @NCBI). Highlighting each species (list in thread) on new website - need photos! (will credit). DM me. Pls retweet #ScienceAlly @PAGXXVIII
Looking for portrait type photos for each species "profile". Listed by common name below. Full list w scientific names at broad.io/200Mammals (also interested in photos/stories about huge effort / communities involved in collecting #DNA samples. Genome seq is easy part!)
Read 13 tweets
3 Dec 19
We have a new paper out today in @Trends_Ecol_Evo (open access). "The History of Farm Foxes Undermines the Animal Domestication Syndrome" @Greger_Larson @UMassMedical @broadinstitute @karlssonlab sciencedirect.com/science/articl…
It all started with an unplanned visit to a museum on Prince Edward Island by the late Dr. Raymond Coppinger, and ended with us questioning a widely accepted theory known as the domestication syndrome. @culturesside
culturesummerside.com/international-…
The (animal) domestication syndrome is the idea that, when an animal species is domesticated, a suite of changes in behavior and appearance all occur together. It was first described by none other than Charles Darwin.
Read 15 tweets