Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #refactoring

Most recents (3)

for that first iteration of the code, simple don't mean shortcut:

simple != easy
simple != hacky
simple != rushed
simple != poorly written

even the first cut, MVP, needs to be changeable, testable, clear, expressive, etc

#TDD #technicalDebt #refactoring
the "make it work" part (K.Beck) always gets mistaken to mean, hack at the code, squeeze, force-fit, finagle, the easiest and quickest thing that'll get the managers, customers, users off our back.

but we just end up on the wrong side of karma

2/3
it just adds high interest technical debt, and need to refactor out:

- initial understanding, with deeper insight into the feature
- tightly coupled, low cohesion, incoherent, viscous, rigid, fragile, immobile code

#highInterestTechnicalDebt
#technicalDebt

3/3
Read 3 tweets
sometimes the kind of refactoring that clears the way for easier extension, is not a refactoring toward this or that design pattern, but a refactoring to support a deeper conceptual understanding of a functional use case/ user scenario

#conceptualContours #ddDesign
oh you refactor refactor 😅
study and understand a user scenario or business process; then model and design their concepts

think of principles like high cohesion and low coupling, but in terms of concepts first, then classes and code mechanisms

#ddDesign #softwareDesign
Read 8 tweets
I'm only halfway through Bertrand Meyer's 2014 book, "Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly", but it's already proven its worth as a lucid, unrestrained appraisal of #Agile principles and methodologies. Here are a few passages that resonated with me...
"#XP's insistence that [pair programming] should be the absolute rule [...] makes little sense conceptually, as it neglects the role of programmer personality (some excellent developers like to concentrate alone and will resent having to be paired) [...]"
"Starting any significant software project (anything beyond a couple of months and a couple of developers) without taking the time to write some basic document defining core requirements is professional malpractice."
Read 19 tweets

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