Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #historykethread

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#HistoryKeThread After Britain and Oman had signed the Moresby Treaty in 1822, two British ships under the command of Captain William Fitzwilliam Wentworth Owen were dispatched to the Indian Ocean to survey the East African coast and Arabia.
The captain's mandate was to monitor and stamp out any slave trade activity in the region. Owen was a man so fervently committed to the cause of ridding the world of slavery that he sailed to Muscat on his ship, HMS Leven, to harangue Seyyid Said about the horrors of slave trade.
The other ship under his command, HMS Barracouda, paid a visit to Mombasa to stock up on supplies. The Barracouda sailed into Mombasa harbour on December 4th 1823.
Read 25 tweets
#HistoryKeTrivia #HistoryKeThread Many of you will know that the East African Standard is Kenya’s oldest newspaper, having been founded in 1902.
In those early 20th century years, there were also less known but fairly well acclaimed weeklies. We can tell you of two, both of which were interestingly founded not by Britons but Americans.
Globetrotter was one of them. Its founder and editor was one David Garrick Longworth.
Read 7 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: Then British Governor of British East Africa, Col. Sir James Hayes Sadler (2nd right), rides the train from Mombasa with his guest, Sir Winston Churchill (r), then Secretary of the Colonies, in 1907.
Sir Churchill, 33, had just begun his tour of East Africa.
The visit was a morale booster somewhat for Sadler, who months back had faced calls from right wing settlers to resign from office.
Read 10 tweets

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#HistoryKeThread When Vasco da Gama Came Calling
Just around early March in 1498, Portuguese sailors led by Vasco da Gama sailed north from the Cape of Good Hope.

It is recorded by Portuguese historians that as they did so, they bullied any boats they came across, something that blotted the visitors’ image to locals.
Indeed, word of the Portuguese bad manners spread across the East African coast. In fact, by the time the Portuguese landed in Mombasa on Saturday 7th April 1498, they were considered hostile visitors.
Read 15 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: It is pointing out a few things regarding Mwariama as seen on this video.
A few people on my FB page have concluded that Mwariama was “possessed”, or was high on weed or something of the sort.

I will not pretend I know the reason why Mwariama in this clip has an uncanny stare like that of a possessed man.

However.....
....many Mau Mau fighters emerged from the forest along with their adaptations. Having been used to the dark in the forest, many would stare with their eyes wide open as a result of adaptation.
Read 7 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: Mzee's Life In England

This is a note that Mzee Jomo Kenyatta wrote whilst living in England to dedicate his book, My People of Kikuyu, to his landlord, Mr. A.G. Linfield.
Mr. Linfield is seen here (left) with Mzee when he paid his former tenant a visit at State House, Nairobi, in 1965.
Although there isn’t much recorded about Mzee Kenyatta’s life in England, where he lived, studied and worked for much of the period between 1929 and 1946, we will attempt to give a peek at his time in that country.
Read 38 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: I’ll tell you a few things about these pictures.

They are 1940s photos of a girls’ school, Loreto Convent Lumbwa (Kipkelion), which was run by Loreto catholic sisters from Msongari in Nairobi.
See, when World War 2 broke out, the colonial authorities wanted the grounds and buildings of Loreto Convent Msongari School, Nairobi, be occupied by the British army’s Women Service Corps.
And so the school administrators were asked to look for alternative grounds for their school. These they found more than 120 miles away, at Lumbwa. Majority of the exclusively white students at Msongari were therefore moved to Lumbwa for the duration of the war.
Read 6 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: Ronald Gideon Ngala
On Christmas Day in 1972, the country was shocked to learn of the death via a road crash of the Minister for Power and Communications, Hon. Ronald Gideon Ngala.
Mr. Ngala had thirteen days earlier, on 12th December 1972, been involved in a road accident near Konza. His official car rolled as he was being driven to Mombasa from Nairobi following festivities to mark Jamhuri Day.
Read 20 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: Traditional ornaments of the Agîkûyû.
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Older men of the Agîkûyû community cut their hair short at a certain stage of growth, whilst young girls left a circular-like patch of hair on the top of their heads.
The men wore a piece of goat skin fastened on the right shoulder. They also wore a heart-shaped bit of leather that hung down the back, suspended by a thin string worn around the neck. This piece of leather was turned up to protect the head when it rained.
The women on the other hand wore an apron of tanned and dressed goatskin fastened around the waist, and which dropped down the length of their thighs.
Read 4 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: The Making of Kenya In Berlin

In October of 1886, European powers Britain and Germany sat down in Berlin to sign the Anglo-German Agreement. A subsequent ratification was done in 1890 and became known as the Heligoland treaty.
Ahead of this Berlin meeting, the Germans had signed up a number of treaties with various inland communities around Mt. Kilimanjaro, and even as far as Witu (Lamu mainland), whose fort is seen in the background of this photo.
These were areas that were generally considered to be under the Sultan of Zanzibar, Seyyid Barghash, whom they ignored.
Read 11 tweets
#HistoryKeThread When The Concorde Called On The Home Of The Pride
In 1988, British Airway and Air France staged commemorative flights around the world on Concorde jets.
Nairobi was one of the stops of the 23-day around-the-world tour. The Kenyan government, intending to make hay out of the tour, laid down the red carpet for the passengers, who had each forked out up to $26,000 for the world tour tickets.
Read 11 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: Early 1900s Kamba In The Eyes Of An American Author
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Previously, I wrote about American author’s Elmer Davies’ observations of the Agîkûyû when he visited East Africa in the period leading to 1904. These he noted in the book Western Field, a magazine that featured stories about the hunting exploits of various American hunters...
...both at home and overseas.

Elmer gives us a glimpse of how the Kamba were martially organized during raids by other communities, notably the Maasai.
Read 11 tweets
#HistoryKeThread There is plenty to remember retired President Moi for. Some memories cast him in favourable light; others, bad.

But since today is his day, thanks to a recent court ruling, let me tell of when years ago the court made his day, too.
In July 1998, the High Court convened to rule on the petition of Democratic Party's (DP) Presidential contestant, Mr. Mwai Kibaki. The DP leader had accused President Moi of rigging himself in during the 1997 general elections.
The case was dismissed after the court ruled that Mr. Kibaki's lawyers did not personally serve the incumbent (Moi) with copies of the petition. But the truth of the matter was that Kibaki's lawyers were denied personal access to President Moi by presidential guards.
Read 4 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: Seen here conferring with then President Moi, Mr. Burudi Nabwera is a former diplomat, MP, Asst. Minister and later not only Secretary General of KANU in its heydays, but also a Minister for State.
Last year, the alumnus of Makerere University released his biography, ‘How It Happened’, a book that should be a good read for anyone interested in the politics of Kenya during the single-party era.
On 7th of October 1990, Mr. Nabwera caused a stir when he announced that the government would not prosecute anyone for the murder of former minister Robert Ouko. The report by Scotland Yard’s detective John Troon, Nabwera argued, had not named any killers.
Read 4 tweets
#HistoryKeThread An American’s Observation Of Life Among The Agîkûyû

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Published in San Francisco, United States, Western Field was an American west coast monthly sports hunter magazine.

The magazine featured stories about the hunting exploits of various American hunters both at home and overseas.
One such adventurer was Elmer Davies, who spent some time among the Wakamba, Wataveta and the Agîkûyû in the period until sometime in early 1904.
Read 24 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: The Wadavida (Taita) Of Yore

In 1890, author Thomas Stevens authored the book, Scouting for Stanley.
The book is an account of the time Thomas spent in East Africa, where he had been sent to join in the search for legendary explorer Henry Morton Stanley.
In April of 1898, he camped at Ndara Hill among the Wataita. Here, a Rev. Wray of the Church Mission Society strived to teach the Wataita with much difficulty about the gospel of Christ. Perhaps this difficulty is what led Rev. Wray to dabble in farming.
Read 11 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: When Colonial Officials Adopted Locals As Mistresses

Hell hath no fury like a randy colonial officer stationed miles away from conjugal comfort.
In the early colonial years, the Governors' subordinates were initially men taken over from Imperial British EA Company (IBEAC). Later on, a professional class of colonial civil servants was recruited to take up the many administrative positions opening up in the colony.
Many of the officers had hardly gone beyond the age of 30.

As such, they invariably found themselves sexually starved and lonely. That is, if they didn't have African mistresses.
Read 19 tweets
#HistoryKeThread

Krapf’s Tough Crusade

In July, 1846, pioneering missionary Ludwig Krapf struggled to attend to his ailing, bed-ridden wife.

Krapf had suffered a debilitating fever and so had his wife, Mrs. Dietrich Krapf, who was in a worse state....
She had days earlier given birth to a baby girl at their budding Rabai mission.

Hours to her death, she asked Krapf to bury her right there at Rabai, saying she needed her remains to "constantly remind the passersby of the great object which...
...had brought the servants of the church of Christ to their country...."

Krapf would much later write that his wife "wished to be preaching to them by the lonely spot which encloses her earthly remains."
Read 16 tweets
#HistoryKeThread:

After Kinoo, westwards along the Nairobi-Nakuru highway is a place called Karûri. It was named after Agîkûyû chief Karûri wa Gakure, who actually hailed from Kangema in present-day Murang'a county.
Chief Karûri made trading trips from his village, trudging with his caravan along the edge of the Aberdares towards Kikuyu mostly, and at times Kijabe and Naivasha.
Interestingly, Field Marshal Mbaria Kaniu followed the same route from Kangema to lead the #MauMau massacre at Lari.
Read 22 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: In his book, The Making Of A Colony, Lord Cranworth made comparisons between various communities in Kenya.

The comparisons were made between 1908 and 1912, when the book was published.
He had fond things to say about the Luo, but wasn’t half as flattering in his analysis of, say, the Agîkûyû or the Kamba.

In his observed opinion, the lakeside community was made up of hard working men.
Unlike the Agîkûyû, whom he said left a lot of the hard work to their womenfolk, the Luo man was industrious, happy to get his hands dirty on strenuous chores. This, according to him, was the reason why the average Luo man had a tall and muscular demeanour.
Read 19 tweets
#HistoryKeThread: The Handshake In Kano

We know that the Uganda Railway was from 1896 called so because Kisumu, which was the destined railhead, was part of Uganda.
Even as part of then Uganda, large swathes of western Kenya as we know them today were collectively referred to as the Nandi Protectorate.
On 1st April 1902, the Nandi Protectorate, incorporating Kisii and Luo Nyanza, Luhyaland and greater Nandi country, was transferred to East Africa Protectorate. The resulting province was given the name Nyanza, although I am not sure how the name “Nyanza” came about.
Read 22 tweets
#HistoryKeThread #MzeeKenyattaMemorial

Sometime in 1976, James Kanyotu, the time the Head of Kenya's Special Branch, summoned an urgent meeting between him, AG Charles Njonjo, and the Head of Civil Service, Geoffrey Karîîithi. The meeting was held at Kanyotu's residence.
The meeting at Redhill had been triggered by Dr. Bernard's worrisome diagnosis of the man who had led Kenya since independence.
Kanyotu's sharp instincts had impelled him to act. He knew something was amiss. On the eve of the meeting between the trio, a dinner was hosted in honour of Dr. Barnard. Kanyotu was in attendance.
Read 32 tweets
#HistoryKeThread At around the time of this thread, at 1030HRS twenty years ago, on 7th August 1998, guards at the rear entrance of the United States of America embassy building in downtown Nairobi waved down a truck for routine inspection. It was halted as its occupants...
...tried to force their way into the rear entrance of the embassy building, situated at the busy junction of Nairobi’s Haile Selassie and Moi Avenues.

A brief argument ensued between embassy guards and the truck’s “arab-looking men”, who insisted they had a package to deliver...
...and needed to access the basement of the building.

Amidst the argument, a small blast went off.
Read 35 tweets
1/17 #HistoryKeThread Feature On The Wakamba
2/17 Charles Dundas was a British administrator serving in ukambani around 1910.
3/17 This is what he once wrote of the Kamba:
Read 18 tweets

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