Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #middleages

Most recents (6)

@CatacombSociety It's starting - will stay on as long as I can before teaching classes this p.m. @Ist_Svizzero #sharingcatacombs
@CatacombSociety @Ist_Svizzero PhD candidate Caroline Bridel speaks about work on iconography and expression of identity at the grave. She defines "sharing" in space (proximity) and sharing of tomb, legally possible for all in #Rome, just law of propriety in terms of possession.
#SharingCatacombs
@CatacombSociety @Ist_Svizzero Bridel moves into topic of shared tomb design, architecture and objects, decorations (although we don't in fact know if the original developers of the "pagan" hypogeum at Vigna Randanini were in fact pagan - @archeoappia!).
Read 30 tweets
Matilda of Canossa in Modern(ish) Myths: @GooseIsland makes a beer named "Matilda" which may just seem like a fun name choice until you learn it's the brewery's homage to Orval and their use of Brettanomyces yeast. 1/
The connection isn't immediately clear unless you're familiar with the trappist ale. Founded in 1931, the brewery sits within the old walls of the Abbey Notre Dame d'Orval which was founded in the first quarter of the 11th century (though the site was previously occupied). 2/
You might be thinking at this point: how the heck does this involve Matilda of Canossa? Orval Brewery cites a fascinating foundational myth regarding the water source they have consistently used for their brewing 3/
Read 11 tweets
What do we teach when we teach "Medieval Europe"?
Do we teach Europe to set up Historical #Comparison?
OR to teach a Global (or, Alex West @siwaratrikalpa's much more coherent Hemispheric) #MiddleAges?
Here's how I see the two options...
(obvs others, I'm a Byzantinist after all)
My students discuss CWickham's intro in
Medieval Europe (2016; Review: I like the book)
CW argues for "Medieval Europe" as artificial category with value in setting up historical #comparison.
There's a cleverness to that.
But here's my problem, as explained to my students...
There is no comparison.
Practically speaking.
To do a comparison, you don't need to just find a region with some big similar stats (geog, pop, resources), you need to find something similarly studied, with comparable bibliographies.
MAYBE, in not too long, "Medieval China"?
Read 10 tweets
18th JUNE: ST ELIZABETH OF SCONAUGE

~thread~
1. Three monasteries in Germany bear the name of Sconauge: one of Cistercian monks near Heidelberg, founded by Buggo, bishop of Worms in 1135; another of nuns of the same Order in Franconia;
#StElizabethOfSconauge #June18th2020 Image
2. a third of monks of the Order of St Bennet in the diocess of Triers, four German miles from Bingen, was founded by Hildelin, a nobleman, who, in 1125, took himself the monastic habit, and was chosen first abbot. Not far distant he built a great nunnery of the same Order
3. and name which is now extinct, though the three former remain to this day.

Soon after the foundation of this house, when regular discipline flourished there with great edification to the church, St Elizabeth, who from her infancy had been a vessel of election,
#June18th
Read 5 tweets
10th JUNE: ST LANDRY

~thread~
1. St Landry (Landericus) of Paris was a bishop of Paris. He built a hospital dedicated to St Christopher, which later became the Hotel-Dieu de Paris. He died in 661.

The following are excerpts about St Landry from the book
#StLandry #Christianity Image
2."The Golden Legend or Lives of the Saints" by Jacobus de Voragine, Archbishop of Genoa, 1275, originally in #Latin, which apparently was the most widely read book (after the Bible) during the late Middle Ages:
#Bible #CatholicChurch #Christian #MiddleAges #medievaltwitter #book
3. St Landry was right glorious bishop of Paris. God that guided him brought him to Paris and there he was the first bishop, and there he ordained clerks and officers to serve the church. He was the twenty-seventh bishop after St Denis. He sat in the chair of the church
Read 9 tweets
Around 3000 BCE in eastern #Europe, a Proto-Balto-Slavic #language started to diverge from #ProtoIndoEuropean.

The #Slavic branch of the #IndoEuropean #languages began about 2,000 years later when Proto-Slavic deviated from Proto-Balto-Slavic.

[Image: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Balt…] Source: The Indo-European L...
As the #Slavic-speaking area expanded during the first millennium CE (striped area on map), Proto-Slavic transitioned to Common Slavic. The #language underwent minor changes that occurred mostly uniformly across eastern #Europe, thereby maintaining mutual intelligibility. A map of eastern Europe sho...
Around the year 1000 CE #CommonSlavic began to split into the South, West, and East branches to which all modern #Slavic #languages belong.

Roughly 315m people speak a Slavic #language, mostly in Eastern #Europe (including the #Balkan peninsula), #CentralAsia, and #Siberia. A map of Europe highlightin...
Read 359 tweets

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