Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #nufc

Most recents (20)

Newcastle United’s 2017/18 financial results reflect their promotion after a single season in the Championship. Managing director Lee Charnley said, “A 10th placed finish in our first season back in the Premier League was a fantastic achievement.” Some thoughts follow #nufc
#NUFC promotion brought the club back to “a healthy financial position”, moving from £47m loss before tax to £23m profit, as revenue more than doubled from £86m to a record £178m and no repeat of prior year £32m exceptional costs: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts.
#NUFC £93m revenue growth very largely driven by broadcasting’s £79m increase to £126m, reflecting vastly higher TV money in the Premier League, while commercial also increased £13m (90%) to £28m, but match day flat at £24m. However, profit on player sales dropped £39m to £4m.
Read 48 tweets
Crystal Palace’s 2017/18 financial results covered their 5th consecutive season in the Premier League, when they finished “in a very creditable” 11th place. Roy Hodgson replaced Frank De Boer as manager in September 2017. Some thoughts in the following thread #CPFC
#CPFC posted a £35.5m loss before tax, compared to an £11.8m profit the prior year, mainly due to profit on player sales falling £32m to just £2m, though revenue grew £7.6m (5%) from £142.7m to a club record £150.3m. Loss after tax was £33.4m, thanks to a £2.1m tax credit.
#CPFC £8m revenue growth was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £4m (4%) increase from £117m to £121m, mainly due to increased prize money for finishing 11th, while commercial also increased £3.1m (21%) from £15.2m to £18.3m and match day was up £0.3m (2%) to £10.9m.
Read 38 tweets
Southampton’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 17th in the Premier League and reached the FA Cup semi-finals, much worse than previous season (8th place in PL, competed in the Europa League and got to the EFL Cup final). Some thoughts follow #SaintsFC
Although #SaintsFC directors described the season as “disappointing”, they were “pleased to report another year of positive financial performance.” This was the first season under the ownership of Lander Sports (UK), controlled by Chinese businessman Jisheng Gao.
#SaintsFC pre-tax profit fell from £42m to £35m, as revenue dropped 16% (£30m) to £153m, due to the poor performance on the pitch, though this was largely offset by profit on player sales increasing by £27m to £69m. Profit after tax was down from £34m to £29m.
Read 38 tweets
Aston Villa’s 2017/18 financial results covered their second season in the Championship with Tony Xia as chairman following relegation from the Premier League. They finished 4th, but narrowly missed out on promotion after losing in the play-off final. Some thoughts follow #AVFC
Following that defeat, #AVFC “experienced significant liquidity problems”, including a missed tax payment to HMRC, which led to a rescue by billionaire businessmen Nassef Sawiris and Wes Edens, who injected £68m of funding with NSWE SCS becoming the club’s controlling owners.
#AVFC loss increased by £21m from £15m to £36m, as revenue dropped £5m (7%) from £74m to £69m and profit on player sales fell £11m from £27m to £16m. On the other hand, the club received £3m compensation for HS2 rail project, which will go through part of the training ground.
Read 42 tweets
Leicester City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 9th in the Premier League and reached the quarter-finals in both domestic cups. Claude Puel replaced Craig Shakespeare as manager in October. Some thoughts in the following thread #LCFC
#LCFC profit before tax significantly decreased from a record £92m to £2m (profit after tax down from £80m to £1m), as revenue fell by around a third (£74m) from £233m to £159m, because there was no repeat of the unprecedented 2016/17 Champions League participation.
The #LCFC revenue decline was driven by broadcasting income’s £67m (35%) decrease to £124m, mainly due to £70m from the Champions League in the prior season. For much the same reason, gate receipts fell £4m (22%) to £13m, while commercial income was also £4m (15%) lower at £22m.
Read 39 tweets
Wolverhampton Wanderers 2017/18 financial results covered a successful season, when the club was promoted to the Premier League as champions after a six-year absence, led by head coach Nuno Espirito Santo under the ownership of Fosun International. Some thoughts follow #WWFC
#WWFC loss shot up from £23m to a breathtaking £57m, largely due to increased expenditure on players and wages plus an estimated £20m on bonuses and additional transfer fee payments following promotion.
#WWFC revenue rose 11% (£2.6m) from £23.8m to £26.4m, as commercial increased £1.4m (15%) to £10.6m and gate receipts were up £1.3m (20%) to £7.8m, but broadcasting was flat at £8.0m. Profit on player sales was £5.9m higher at £8.1m.
Read 39 tweets
Middlesbrough’s 2017/18 financial results covered the season after relegation from the Premier League when they reached the Championship play-offs by finishing 5th before losing in the semi-finals. Tony Pulis replaced Garry Monk as manager in December. Some thoughts follow #Boro
Following relegation #Boro moved from a pre-tax £6.9m profit to a £6.4m loss, as revenue halved from £121m to £62m, though profit on player sales was up £4m to £15m. After tax, the decline was even steeper (from £11.5m profit to £6.6m loss), due to prior year’s £4.6m tax credit.
#Boro £59m revenue decline was very largely driven by broadcasting’s £55m fall from £102m to £47m, as the £42m parachute payment was much lower than Premier League £99m distribution. Commercial also decreased £2.9m (26%) to £8.3m and match day was down £1.6m (18%) at £7.1m.
Read 33 tweets
Queens Park Rangers 2017/18 financial results covered a season the club described as one “of rebuilding and reflection”, as they finished 16th in the Championship, after which manager Ian Holloway left to be replaced by Steve McClaren. Some thoughts in the following thread #QPR
#QPR loss significantly increased by £32m from £6m to £38m, largely due to booking a £20m FFP fine (for previous misdemeanours); a £15m reduction in the parachute payment driving a £17m (35%) decrease in revenue from £48m to £31m; and profit on player sales down £7m to zero.
All three #QPR revenue streams were down. As well as broadcasting slumping £15.1m (43%) to £20.2m, due to the lower parachute payment, commercial fell £1.2m (17%) to £6.3m, while gate receipts were £0.3m (6%) lower at £4.9m.
Read 36 tweets
Deloitte have published the 22nd edition of their annual Football Money League, which ranks the world’s leading football clubs by revenue, this time covering the 2017/18 season. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Real Madrid £665m reclaimed top spot, while Barcelona £612m made it a Spanish “one-two” – the first clubs to break the £600m barrier. #MUFC £590m fell to 3rd, having been 1st last year. Bayern Munich £557m and #MCFC £503m retained 4th & 5th places, while PSG £480m were up to 6th.
There are no fewer than six English clubs in the top ten, including #LFC £455m, #CFC £448m, #AFC £389m and #THFC £379m (overtaking Juventus). Roma, Milan and #NUFC were new entrants to the top 20, replacing #LCFC, #SaintsFC and Napoli.
Read 31 tweets
Birmingham City’s 2017/18 financial results covered a season when they finished 19th in the Championship, only avoiding relegation on the final day, and had three managers: big-spending Harry Redknapp, Steve Cotterill and Garry Monk. Some thoughts in the following thread #BCFC
#BCFC loss before tax more than doubled from £16.4m to a barely credible £37.4m, primarily due to massive investment in the squad: wages rose £16.1m (71%) from £22.5m to £38.6m, while player amortisation increased by £5.0m from £2.6m to £7.6m.
The higher #BCFC loss arose even though revenue grew by 9% (£1.6m) to £19.1m and profit on player sales was up £1.9m to £2.1m. All revenue streams increased: broadcasting £0.6m (9%) to £7.6m, match receipts £0.6m (13%) to £5.1m and commercial £0.4m (6%) to £6.5m.
Read 37 tweets
I published a study last week on where Premier League clubs source their money and what they spend it on by reviewing the clubs’ cash flow statements over the last decade. Today I do a similar exercise on Championship clubs – where the picture is very different.
In the 10 years between 2008 and 2017 Championship clubs had over £2.8 bln of available cash with the vast majority of financing £2.5 bln coming from their owners (loans £1.9bln and shares £0.6 bln)
So an incredible 87% of Championship clubs’ cash came from owner financing with just 7% from operating activities. This is in stark contrast to the Premier League with 54% from operations and 42% from owners. There was also £41m from (net) player sales & £45m from bank balances.
Read 22 tweets
THREAD: 🏴 #PremierLeague strength of schedule breakdown 📊

We rank each side on how many points they can expect to pick up from the next six games using our xG model 👇
1. #ManCity – 14.3 xPoints
City will face sides with an average position of just above midtable over the next six games, looking at average of 2.38 xPoints per game.

#MCFC @City_Watch @City_Chief @SuperbiaProeIia @PicturedCity @City_Xtra @9320pod 👇
2. #LFC – 13.2 xPoints
Liverpool look set to continue their good start to the season. Despite facing #MUFC, we make the Reds’ trip to #WatfordFC their hardest fixture.

@AnfieldEdition @AnfieldHQ @TheRedmenTV @LFCData @anfieldonline @BassTunedToRed 👇
Read 21 tweets
#BristolCity recently published their 2017/18 financial results, which cover a season when they finished a respectable 11th in the Championship and had a memorable run to the Carabao Cup semi-final. Some thoughts in the following thread.
There was a substantial increase in #BristolCity loss before tax from £6.6m to £25.3m, despite revenue increasing £4.7m (22%) to £26m, mainly due to profit on player sales falling by £13.3m to just £0.3m and wages rising by £6.4m (30%) to £27.3m.
The good news was that all #BristolCity revenue streams were up: commercial by £2.2m (23%) to £11.6m; match day by £1.6m (32%) to £6.6m; and broadcasting by £0.9m (13%) to £7.7m.
Read 34 tweets
A long-suffering Newcastle United fan asked how their financial performance compared with Tottenham Hotspur since Mike Ashley bought the club in July 2007, so here’s a few thoughts in the following thread #NUFC #THFC
Both #NUFC and #THFC have focused on profit. #NUFC have essentially broken even during Ashley’s tenure with £4m aggregate profit, while #THFC have reported an impressive £215m. Worth noting that £188m of that came in last 4 seasons, when #NUFC had a £47m loss in Championship.
#NUFC revenue has fallen by £1m since Ashley’s arrival from £87m to £86m, deflated by the lower money in the Championship. In the same period, #THFC revenue has tripled, rising £203m from £103m to £306m. In fairness, #NUFC 2018 revenue will be much higher (£175-180m estimate).
Read 17 tweets
Parachute payments are made to clubs relegated from the Premier League in order to soften the blow of the significant reduction in revenue in the Championship, especially as many players’ wages remain at a high level. The following thread looks at how these payments work.
It is evident that parachutes have a major impact on the competitive balance in the Championship, as the 6 clubs with the highest revenue in 2016/17 all benefited from these payments, most notably the 3 relegated the previous season: #NUFC £86m, #NCFC £75m & #AVFC £74m.
Eight Championship clubs received Premier League parachute payments in 2016/17 with #NUFC, #AVFC and #NCFC getting £41m (up from £26m in 2015/16 thanks to the new TV deal), followed by #QPR £31m, then #CardiffCity, #FFC, #Royals & #WAFC, all £16m.
Read 14 tweets
Although the 2016/17 financial results for the Championship are now a season out-of-date, they are the most recent published by the clubs, so people might still be interested in the comparisons as the new season kicks-off. Some thoughts in the following thread.
In contrast to the Premier League, only 6 clubs in the Championship made money, led by #NFFC £32m & #BarnsleyFC £13m. In this very competitive division most clubs over-extend in a bid to reach the lucrative top flight. Largest losses at 2 promoted clubs: #NUFC £47m & #BHAFC £39m.
Some clubs’ figures impacted by significant exceptional items, so #NFFC (£40m) and #ReadingFC (£9m) were boosted by loan write-offs. In contrast, promotion bonuses adversely affected #HTAFC £12m, #NUFC £10m and #BHAFC £9m. Newcastle also booked £22m onerous contract provisions.
Read 26 tweets
Leeds United’s 2016/17 financial results covered a season when they finished 7th in the Championship under former head coach Garry Monk, thus just missing out on the play-offs #LUFC
2016/17 also saw Massimo Cellino’s three-year reign come to an end, as fellow Italian Andrea Radrizzani first bought a 50% stake in December 2016 before taking 100% ownership in May 2017. He reportedly paid £45m to acquire #LUFC.
#LUFC reported a £1m profit, around £10m better than the previous season’s £8.9m loss, mainly due to £6.1m increase in profit on player sales to £8.9m, though revenue also rose £4m (13%) to £34.1m.
Read 39 tweets
Blackburn Rovers’ financial results for 2016/17 covered “a season to forget for #Rovers fans”, as the club was relegated from the Championship to League One with manager Owen Coyle replaced by Tony Mowbray. The good news is that they have immediately bounced back in 2017/18.
#Rovers loss worsened by £2.3m from £1.5m to £3.8m, mainly due to £7.1m (32%) reduction in revenue to £14.9m and £6.0m fall in profit on player sales to £10.4m, offset by cost cuts: wages £3.4m (13%) to £22.0m, other expenses £4.8m (51%) to £4.5m & player amortisation £1.8m.
Main reason for what #Rovers Finance Director Mike Cheston described as “a significant drop in income” was the loss of parachute payments £10.5m, though the blow was softened by £4.3m solidarity payments. Match day and commercial slightly declined, by £0.2m & £0.1m respectively.
Read 35 tweets
Newcastle United recently published financial results for the 2016/17 season, when they won the Championship to secure immediate promotion back to the Premier League after relegation from the top flight in 2015/16. Some thoughts in the following thread #NUFC
#NUFC relegation “had a huge impact on the club’s financial results”, moving from pre-tax £4.2m profit to £46.7m loss, as revenue dropped by almost a third from £126m to £86m, though loss inflated by £32m exceptional items: £10m promotion bonus & £22m onerous contracts provision.
Main reason for #NUFC £40m revenue decrease was £25m reduction in broadcasting, due to lower TV money in Championship, though commercial and match day also fell £13.6m and £1.3m respectively. Largely offset by £39m increase in profit on player sales from £3m to £42m.
Read 44 tweets
#NUFC loss of £90.9m confirmed before gains on player sales for Sissoko, Wijnaldum etc reduced that by £42.2m
Cash flows from player trading (as some deals on credit) show net cash cost of £11.1m in 2016/17 for 2016/17. Net borrowings from Mike Ashley/MASH Holdings £15m
#NUFC matchday income down 10% despite higher attendances & more matches in #Championship due to lower ticket prices & prawn sandwich sales. Commercial income halved due to loss of #EPL central commercial deals & TV down 35%
Read 12 tweets

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