Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #MCFC

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Everton’s 2018/19 financial results covered a season when they finished 8th in the Premier League for the second year in a row. Marco Silva replaced Sam Allardyce as manager in May 2018 #EFC
As a technical point, it’s worth noting that #EFC changed their accounting close date from May 31st to June 30th, so the 2018/19 accounts covered a 13 month period with little impact on turnover, but an additional month of expenses, which adversely impacted the bottom line.
#EFC loss shot up from £13m to a club record £112m, as revenue fell slightly (1%) to £188m, still second highest in club’s history, despite dropping out of the Europa League, and profit on player sales fell £68m to £20m, while player investment meant expenses increased by £46m.
Read 50 tweets
Deloitte have published the 23rd edition of their annual Football Money League, which ranks the world’s leading football clubs by revenue, this time covering the 2018/19 season. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Barcelona £741m overtook Spanish rivals Real Madrid £667m to claim top spot for the first time, becoming the first club to break through the £700m barrier. #MUFC £627m and Bayern Munich £582m retained 3rd and 4th ranking, while PSG £560m (5th) and #MCFC £538m (6th) swapped places
There are no fewer than five English clubs in the top ten, also including #LFC £533m, #THFC £459m, and #CFC £452m. However, #AFC £393m dropped two places to 11th, their lowest position since 2000/01. Lyon and Napoli were new entrants to the top 20, replacing Milan and #NUFC.
Read 39 tweets
Chelsea’s 2018/19 financial results covered a season when they finished 3rd in the Premier League, thus qualifying for the Champions League, won the Europa League and reached the League Cup final. Coach Maurizio Sarri replaced by Frank Lampard in July. Some thoughts follow #CFC
#CFC swung from £67m profit before tax to a £102m loss a huge £169m deterioration. Although revenue slightly increased by £3m (1%) to a record £447m, the damage was done by profit on player sales falling £53m to £65m and expenses rising by a hefty £119m. Loss after tax was £97m.
Commercial income increased £15m (9%) from £165m to £180m, but there were reductions in the other revenue streams, mainly due to impact of playing in Europa League instead of Champions League: match day down £7m (10%) from £74m to £67m and broadcasting £4m (2%) lower at £200m.
Read 44 tweets
UEFA have now published the final payments to clubs for 2018/19 European competitions. In the following thread, I will first look at the Champions League distribution, then the Europa League and finally payments by country (with a focus on the Big Five leagues).
In 2018/19 each of 32 clubs qualified for Champions League group stage got €14.5m plus €2.7m for a win and €900k for a draw. Additional prize money for each further stage reached: last 16 €9.5m, quarter-final €10.5m, semi-final €12m, final €15m and winners €19m.
#FCBarcelona had the highest 2018/19 Champions League payment of €118m, but English clubs received four of the top six distributions: winners #LFC €111m, runners-up #THFC €102m, #MUFC €93m and #MCFC €93m. #Juventus were 4th with €96m and #PSG 7th with €86m.
Read 41 tweets
Now that the Champions League group stage is over, I thought it might be interesting to look at how much money the clubs have already received. Spoiler alert: it’s a hell of a lot. Some numbers in the following thread.
The amount distributed to clubs in UEFA Champions League (group stage onwards) has risen €681m (54%) from €1.269 bln to €1.950 bln in the current cycle. This is split: participation €488m (25%), performance €585m (30%), TV pool €292m (15%) & coefficient ranking €585m (30%)
In 2019/20 each of the 32 clubs qualified for the Champions League group stage gets €15.25m plus €2.7m for a win and €900k for a draw. Additional prize money for each further stage reached: last 16 €9.5m, quarter-final €10.5m, semi-final €12m, final €15m and winners €19m.
Read 26 tweets
Manchester City’s 2018/19 financial results covered an “extraordinary” season when they won the domestic treble of Premier League, FA Cup and Carabao Cup, though were eliminated in the Champions League quarter-finals by Tottenham. Some thoughts in the following thread #MCFC
#MCFC profit before tax was flat at £10m, despite revenue rising £35m (7%) from £500m to a record high of £535m, as the revenue growth was offset by costs increasing by the same amount. Profit on player sales was also unchanged at £39m.
#MCFC revenue growth of £35m was entirely due to broadcasting, which increased £42m (20%) from £211m to £253m with Champions League up £31m (57%) to £86m and domestic TV up £11m to £167m – due to a combination of success on the pitch and new deals.
Read 49 tweets
#ManchesterUnited’s long-standing relationship with Chevrolet, at £64 million, is the most lucrative shirt sponsorship deal in the Premier League. From the US automotive brand’s perspective, the agreement looks less attractive in view of #MUFC’s brand value declining since 2018
@utdxtra @utdarena @fcbusiness @utdreport @sistoney67 @MUFR_ @MUnitedFR @FlexUTD @UnitedPeoplesTV #ManUnited is the Premier League club most often perceived as having a rich heritage and history, coming behind only the top Spanish clubs and #Bayern Munich.
These factors are the driving force behind the rewarding partnerships that the brand attracts – at first look Chevrolet
@utdxtra @utdarena @fcbusiness @utdreport @sistoney67 @MUFR_ @MUnitedFR @FlexUTD @UnitedPeoplesTV seems an unusual sponsor, considering its target markets compared to the markets that Manchester United gives access to – but it is the associations with globally recognised heritage that makes the #sponsorship worthwhile. The role that shirt sponsorships can play for commercial
Read 36 tweets
Bayern Munich 2018/19 accounts cover a mixed season. Domestically, they won the Bundesliga for the 7th season in a row, securing the league and cup double for the 12th time. However, they crashed out of the Champions League in the last 16. Some thoughts follow #FCBayern
#FCBayern profit before tax increased from €46m to €75m (profit after tax €52m). Revenue (per Bayern’s definition) rose €93m (14%) to €750m including €90m profit on player sales. The board described the figures as “outstanding”, as both revenue and profit set record highs.
Excluding player sales, #FCBayern revenue rose €31m (5%) from €629m to €660m, mainly due to TV, up €34m (20%) to €211m, though commercial was also up €8m (2%) to €357m. On the other hand, match day down €11m (11%) to €92m. Profit on player sales €62m higher at €90m.
Read 42 tweets
#Juventus 2018/19 accounts cover a season when they won the league (for the eighth year in a row), but were eliminated in the Champions League at the quarter-final stage by Ajax. Head coach Max Allegri left at the end of the season. Some thoughts in the following thread.
#Juventus pre-tax loss widened from €10m to €27m (€40m after tax), despite revenue growing €83m (20%) from €411m to €494m & profit from player sales rising €33m (35%) to €127m, due to significant cost growth of €130m. Revenue (club definition) up €117m to record €621m.
All #Juventus revenue streams increased. Commercial income rose €41m (28%) to €187m (largely the Ronaldo factor); match day was up €14m (25%) to €71m; broadcasting was €6m (3%) higher at €207m; and player loans shot up €22m to €30m.
Read 47 tweets
#Ajax 2018/19 accounts cover their most successful season in years when they won the Dutch league and cup double (for the first time since 2002) and reached the Champions League semi-final with a dazzling brand of football. Some thoughts in the following thread.
#Ajax profit before tax shot up from €3m to €69m (€52m after tax), largely due to revenue more than doubling from €93m to a record €199m (thanks to the CL exploits) and profit on player sales rising from €39m to €73m. The price of success was expenses increasing by €74m.
#Ajax €106m revenue growth was very largely due to the Champions League run with all three streams increasing: broadcasting surged €76m from €13m to €89m; match day rose €20m (63%) from €31m to €51m; and commercial was €11m (22%) higher at €60m.
Read 44 tweets
Manchester United are the first Premier League club to publish 2018/19 financial results, covering a disappointing season when they finished sixth in the league and were eliminated in the Champions League quarter-finals by Barcelona. Some thoughts in the following thread #MUFC
#MUFC profit before tax was up slightly from £26m to £27m, as revenue rose £37m (6%) to a record £627m, but the wage bill also increased £36m (12%) to £332m. After tax club went from £38m loss to £19m profit, as prior year was impacted by non-cash write-off due to US tax reform.
#MUFC first English club above £600m revenue. Almost all growth was in broadcasting, up £37m (18%) to £241m, due to Champions League participation (and new rights agreement). Commercial and match day flat at £275m and £111m respectively. Profit on player sales £8m higher at £26m.
Read 45 tweets
A previous thread explained the differences between a football club’s profit and loss account and its cash flow statement, as it is important to understand where the money has been spent. This thread will look at how this works for each of the 20 Premier League clubs in 2017/18.
#AFC went from £52m operating profit to £42m operating loss, due to lower revenue after failing to qualify for the Champions League, compounded by higher wages and player amortisation plus Wenger pay-off. However, £120m profit on player sales resulted in £70m profit before tax.
#AFC cash flow boosted by favourable £58m movement in working capital (increase in creditors). Spent £29m (net) on players (purchases £110m, sales £81m). Paid £20m for Emirates loan (£11m interest & £9m debt) plus £12m tax. Net cash inflow of £51m was highest in Premier League.
Read 42 tweets
One of the questions most frequently asked by football fans is “Where’s all the money gone?” The answer is only partly found in a club’s profit and loss account, so we need to also look at the cash flow statement to get the full picture. Some thoughts in the following thread.
A club’s profit and loss account is easy to understand, as it is basically revenue less expenses (mainly player wages), but this is an accounting profit based on the accruals concept, which can be very different from actual cash movements.
This is important, as the main reason that football clubs fail is cash flow problems. It does not matter how large your revenue is (or your profits are), if you do not have the cash to pay your players, suppliers or indeed the taxman, then you will find yourself in trouble.
Read 39 tweets
Given the importance of broadcasting income to football clubs, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the differences between the Big 5 European leagues, both in terms of the money received and the distribution methods. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Most of the Premier League TV money is distributed equally: 50% of the domestic deal, overseas deals and commercial revenue. Merit payment (25% of domestic) is based on league position, while facility fees (25% of domestic) are based on number of times club shown live on TV.
As a result, #LFC actually earned most TV money from the Premier League in 2018/19 with £152m, despite finishing behind #MCFC £151m in the league, as they were broadcast live on 3 more occasions than City. The three relegated clubs averaged around £100m.
Read 25 tweets
We get every Premier League player to sit down on camera and say how they want their name pronounced - and there’s LOADS I did wrong. So here’s a thread so you don’t make the same mistakes I did!
First of all - Norwich City’s Teemu Pukki. His first name is actually pronounced ‘TAY-mu’ #ncfc
How about Chelsea’s #USMNT star Christian Pulisic? His surname is ‘puh-LISS-ick’, no Eastern European style ‘itch’ on the end #CFC
Read 11 tweets
There is much talk about the so-called “Big Six” pulling away from the rest of the Premier League financially, but is this actually true? This thread looks at this question from the perspective of revenue, wages and total player costs #AFC #CFC #LFC #MCFC #MUFC #THFC
For the purpose of this analysis, we will take the 7th highest club in terms of revenue and wages for each season between 2010 and 2018. This means that the 7th placed club is not always the same. For example, for the last 4 seasons’ revenue this was #EFC, #LCFC, #WHUFC & #NUFC.
The highest revenue in the 2018 Premier League was #MUFC £590m, followed by #MCFC £503m, #LFC £455m, #CFC £448m, #AFC £389m, #THFC £379m and #EFC £189m. The highest growth since 2010 came at #MCFC with £378m (or 300%).
Read 20 tweets
Football is finally back. Premier League Predictions thread: #PL
20. Steve Bruce is just such an underwhelming appointment. ASM and Joelinton have a lot of potential but relying on them this early in their PL careers seems a risk. If Newcastle do stay up, I have a feeling they’ll get Arab owners soon. The fans would deserve it. #NUFC
19 Crystal Palace. Without Batshuayi and AWB a gaping hole in the team has been left. Relying on a Ayew and Camarasa (he’s decent) isn’t the brightest decision. What kind of mood will Zaha be in? This and Hodgsons experience may be the last hope for Palace. #CPFC
Read 22 tweets
In preparation for the upcoming 2018/19 Premier League season, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the transfer spend over the last decade, including the growing impact on debt. The analysis is split between 3 periods: last 3 years, last 5 years and last 10 years.
The transfer fees spend is taken from the clubs’ cash flow statements, as this is the only completely accurate source of data. However, it is worth noting that this does not always represent the full cost of transfers, due to the (increasing) use of stage payments.
In the very few cases where a cash flow statement was not available, e.g. if a club only published abbreviated accounts while they were in lower leagues, I have taken data for those years from the Transfermarkt website.
Read 24 tweets
As the 2018/19 Premier League season approaches, I thought that it might be interesting to look at the impact of the new three-year TV deal on clubs’ revenue, particularly the changes in the distribution system for the overseas TV deals. Some thoughts in the following thread.
As a reminder, in 2018/19 each club received equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34m, overseas TV £43m and commercial income £5m. Each league position was worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live was worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
Therefore, each club received a total of £82m from equal payments with the only differences in Premier League TV distribution due to: (a) league position, ranging from #MCFC £38m to #HTAFC £2m; (b) live TV games, from #LFC £33m to £12m for #AFCB, #HTAFC, #SaintsFC and Watford.
Read 26 tweets
As Arsenal fans nervously await the outcome of this summer’s transfer window, I thought it might be interesting to look at why the club is facing more financial challenges these days. Some thoughts in the following thread #afcb
On the face of it, #AFC are doing fine, having reported profits for 16 consecutive years, adding up to a grand total of £393m, averaging £25m a year. Furthermore, Arsenal’s profits in the last two years were a healthy £70m in 2017/18 and £45m in 2016/17.
In fact, #AFC £70m profit before tax in 2017/18 (the most recent published accounts) was actually the fifth highest ever registered in the Premier League, though it is worth noting that this was comfortably surpassed by two rivals that season: #THFC £139m and #LFC £125m.
Read 40 tweets
After Saturday’s final, the estimates for this season’s Champions League revenue for Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur can be updated. We can also look at the incredible amounts of TV income earned by English clubs in 2018/19. Some analysis in the following thread #LFC #THFC
#LFC earned an additional €4m for winning the competition (for the sixth time), bringing their total to €111m (£98m), while #THFC remain at €102m (£90m). As a reminder, #MUFC and #MCFC received €93m (£83m) and €93m (82m) respectively.
#LFC 2018/19 Champions League revenue of €111m (£98m) is €30m (£26m) higher than €81m (£72m) they earned in 2017/18, having won the trophy against “only” reaching the final. It includes: participation €15.3m, prize money €60.0m, UEFA coefficient €23.3m & TV pool €12.7m.
Read 16 tweets
After last night’s Europa League final, the estimates for this season’s Europa League revenue for Arsenal and Chelsea can be updated #CFC earned an additional €4m for winning the competition, bringing their total to €44m (£39m), while #AFC remain at €36m (£32m).
However, #CFC 2018/19 Europa League revenue of €44m (£39m) is €21m (£19m) lower than the €65m (£58m) they earned in the 2017/18 Champions League. It includes: participation €2.9m, prize money €18.3m, UEFA coefficient €3.4m & TV pool €19.1m.
Despite reaching the final, #AFC 2018/19 revenue of €36m (£32m) is €2m (£1m) lower than the €38m (£33m) they earned for getting to the semi-final in 2017/18. It includes: participation €2.9m, prize money €14.3m, UEFA coefficient €3.4m and TV pool €15.6m.
Read 9 tweets
The Premier League has published its TV revenue for the 2018/19 season, ranging from £97m for #HTAFC to £152m for #LFC, who earned more than league winners #MCFC £151m, due to more matches broadcast live. Some thoughts in the following thread.
Each club receives equal shares for 50% of domestic TV £34.4m, overseas TV £43.2m and commercial income £5.0m. Each league position is worth £1.9m (merit payment), while each match broadcast live is worth £1.1m (on top of £12.2m for a minimum of 10 games).
#LFC Premier League TV money increased by £6.5m from £145.9m to £152.4m in 2018/19, due to a £3.6m higher merit payment (for finishing 2nd, compared to 4th the previous season) and £2.4m more from overseas TV deals. Benefited from most live TV games: 29 vs. #MCFC 26.
Read 14 tweets
Last week I estimated how much English clubs would earn from the 2018/19 Champions League. Today I take a look at this season’s Europa League revenue for Arsenal and Chelsea #AFC #CFC
Although total Europa League revenue has significantly increased (by 40%) in 2018/19, two points are worth noting: (a) this is lower than the 54% Champions League increase; (b) the impact of the new UEFA coefficient (though only 15% of total distribution, compared to 30% in CL).
As a result, both #AFC and #CFC are estimated to earn less than last year. #CFC is obvious, as they were in the Champions League in 2017/18, but #AFC is due to the impact of UEFA coefficient & TV pool. As it stands (prior year in brackets):

#AFC €36m (€38m)
#CFC €40m (€65m)
Read 16 tweets

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