Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #bloodysunday

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Edmond Pettus was born #OTD in 1821 in Limestone County, Alabama. He served as an officer in the Confederate Army and as a US senator after the War. He was also active in the Ku Klux Klan, serving as its Grand Dragon in Alabama. He is the namesake of the Edmund Pettus Bridge.
Born into an enslaving family, Pettus built a successful law career before enlisting in the Confederate Army when war broke out. While most of his home region of northern Alabama did not support secession, Pettus did. He was a pro-slavery ideologue steered by white supremacy.
During the War he rose to the rank of Brig. General and was captured as a POW three times. He was pardoned by Andrew Johnson on October 30, 1865. Pettus returned to Selma after the War and resumed his law practice.
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#tdih 1965 People began march from Selma to Montgomery in protest of police murder of Jimmie Lee Jackson and violation of const'l rights to vote. Attacked by state troopers.

Read long history of organizing & repression, incl. with HS students ⬇️ #SNCC zinnedproject.org/news/tdih/bloo…
Jimmie Lee Jackson, civil rights activist & Baptist church deacon, was shot by state troopers in Marion, Ala. in Feb., during a voting rights march.

His murder was catalyst for Selma to Montgomery march, attacked by troopers on #BloodySunday. #tdih zinnedproject.org/news/tdih/jimm…
Textbooks focus on segregation with CRM -- but students should learn that demands were also for end to police violence. Incl. when African Americans exercising right to vote often brutally attacked by police.

Below is grades 7+ lesson. #BlackLivesMatter zinnedproject.org/materials/riot…
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Journalist Murray Sayle wrote this piece about #BloodySunday just 5 days after the murders. It was spiked by Sunday Times editor Harold Evans, but fifty years on remains an astonishingly accurate account of what the Army was up to. lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v24/…
Perhaps it was telling that it took a man from a colonised country (Australia) to recognise the British Army account for the tissue of lies that it was. And it was an unforgivably supine decision of Evans to not run the piece. Sayle did the right thing and resigned
Evans decision to withhold Sayle's research from the Widgery Tribunal doubtless also made the whitewash easier, though there was the troubling question of protecting sources. How different the course of The Troubles might have been.
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1/ This is the BBC News Special broadcast on Sunday, 30th Jan 1972.
It is 11mins long so I've had to split it over several tweets
Part one
#BloodySunday50
2/ Part two. BBC News Special broadcast on
Sunday, 30 January 1972 #BloodySunday50
#BloodySunday
3/ Part three. BBC News Special broadcast on
Sunday, 30 January 1972 #BloodySunday50
#BloodySunday
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The #BloodySunday march has just started in Derry
Irish Taoiseach @MichealMartinTD and Foreign minister @simoncoveney on their way to the #BloodySunday memorial.
#BloodySunday50 #Derry 🇬🇧🇮🇪
The heartbreaking names of #BloodySunday victims are being read out
#BloodySunday50 #Derry 🇬🇧🇮🇪
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Mezzo secolo dopo, quelle lacrime di sangue e dolore non si sono asciugate. Gerry Duddy, 64 anni, prova a trattenerle. Charlie Glenn, 68, proprio non ce la fa.

Il mio reportage da #Derry: "Chiediamo giustizia per il #BloodySunday" 🇬🇧🇮🇪

repubblica.it/esteri/2022/01…
#BloodySunday50
1. Gerry Duddy davanti al murales che rappresenta la morte di suo fratello Jackie, 17 anni, nel Bloody Sunday del 1972 (foto di Antonello Guerrera) Image
2. Ecco Charlie Glenn, 50 anni dopo: ossia quel ragazzo al centro del murales di #Derry con gli occhiali, mentre regge Jackie Duddy morto durante il "Bloody Sunday" di cinquant'anni fa (foto di Antonello Guerrera) #BloodySunday50 #BloodySunday 🇬🇧🇮🇪 @repubblica Image
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NOW: The #SulongUP Student Summit 2021 begins.

Organized by the UP OSR and UPLB USC, this summit will cover topics such as the current conditions in the ST region and some parts of the UP system.

#UPStudentSummit2021 Image
In her opening remarks, UPLB USC Vice-Chair Ma. Shaira Lei Daludado asserted that even though the students are not part of the workforce, they are still affected by the socio-economic effects brought about by the pandemic.

#SulongUP
#UPStudentSummit2021 Image
Daludado emphasizes the importance of upholding the students’ democratic right to academic freedom and #LigtasNaBalikEskwela, and for the admin to heed to the needs and calls of the students.

#SulongUP
#UPStudentSummit2021
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THREAD: As the nation remembers #BloodySunday and the violent scenes on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, Republicans in state legislatures are fighting to resurrect the dark history of Jim Crow, and Georgia is on the front lines of GOP voter suppression. #gapol brennancenter.org/our-work/resea…
From attempts to criminalize those handing out food and water to voters waiting in long lines, to efforts dismantle the Black church tradition of Souls to the Polls, these bills, like those in the era of Bloody Sunday, are targeting Black and brown voters. nytimes.com/2021/03/06/us/…
Advocates, voters, and faith leaders are speaking out against bills like #HB531 and #SB241 that prolong an age-old legacy of racist voter suppression. On the anniversary Bloody Sunday, the urgency of passing #HR1 and #HR4 cannot be overstated. ajc.com/opinion/opinio…
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"This is the first commemoration of #BloodySunday without John Lewis. John Lewis was our moral compass, our North Star...He left us this past year, but he didn't leave us without directions & instructions. He told us to vote like never before. And we did." --@Sifill_LDF #Selma56
"That day...Georgia elected for the first time since Reconstruction a Black United States Senator, and GA also elected for the first time in its history a Jewish United States Senator...They are symbols of what we can do when we marshal our strength and determination to vote."
"What Black voters have faced for centuries, when white supremacists have found themselves to be losing power, was finally seen by the entire country on January sixth. And that means we have a lot more work to do than many people understood." --@Sifill_LDF
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56 years ago ... 600 marched to be seen, to be heard, to be valued. They were harassed, beaten, & bloodied. The nation responded w/ the passage of the VRA, yet today legislatures across the nation are passing laws to limit the rights once again. #WeWontGoBack 1/
Similar to then, there is a looming question today for Democrats & Republicans in Congress- what will you do in the face of injustice?

HR1/HR4 puts an end to attempts to suppress the rights of voters & honors the hurt, harm, & sacrifices of so many like my hero John Lewis. 2/
I hope folks can put aside the pettiness & partisanship to do what is right. However if the GOP decides to not move forward, Democrats MUST act and do what is necessary to protect the rights of all voters in the nation. #WeWontGoBack #ForThePeopleAct 3
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Thread. 1. Biden’s #BloodySunday Order an Important Step in Promoting Voter Access civilrights.org/2021/03/07/bid… via @civilrightsorg
2. I think most of us could use a refresher on #BloodySunday. That includes me. I found a good detailed description at the Encyclopedia of #Alabama.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-1876 ""Bloody Sunday" refers to the March 7, 1965, civil rights march"
3. The march was supposed to go 'from Selma to the capitol in Montgomery to protest the shooting death of activist Jimmie Lee Jackson. The roughly 600 marchers were violently driven back by Alabama State Troopers, Dallas County Sheriff's deputies, and a horse-mounted posse"
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Today is the anniversary of #BloodySunday, the day 600 people began a march in Selma after police killed an unarmed black man.

At the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were beaten & gassed by police. Amelia Boynton, knocked unconscious. A young John Lewis, fractured skull.
The peaceful march was to confront Alabama’s governor about police abuses of power & the denial of Black people’s voting rights. They were only given more violence, more oppression.

Nevertheless, they persisted. Bloody Sunday was just the first of the Selma to Montgomery marches
More marches followed w/ the right to vote taking center stage. And the fight continues today against those who want to make it harder for some Americans to vote.

#HR1 & #HR4 (aptly named after John Lewis) are needed to restore hard-won protections.

brennancenter.org/our-work/analy…
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55 years ago, brave women and men marched from Selma to Montgomery, risking their lives to demand full and equal participation in our democracy. Because of them, today Congress and state legislatures and city councils all over the country look a little more like America.
But today we find ourselves fighting modern-day poll taxes and literacy tests. We're witnessing the systematic dismantling of the voting rights the footsoldiers of Selma, including my friend @repjohnlewis, were beaten & bloodied for. We can't allow their sacrifices to be in vain.
On this anniversary of #BloodySunday, let's tell Mitch McConnell: stop blocking #HR4.

It's time to restore the most fundamental right in our democracy - the right to vote.
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#OTD in 1965 brave activists attempted a 54-mile march from Selma, AL to Montgomery, AL for #votingrights.

But upon crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge, state troopers with billy clubs & tear gas assaulted the men & women.

This day became known as #BloodySunday. ImageImageImageImage
Even injured, they were committed to completing the march.

The heinous violence led @NAACP_LDF to file & win a lawsuit against the AL Governor, which afforded the marchers federal protection for a subsequent march.

You can read the march plan here: naacpldf.org/ldf-at-selma-5…
#BloodySunday, the protected march that took place weeks later, & the fearless leaders of the civil rights movement are credited for the passage of the #VotingRights Act of 1965.

The #VRA tore down the barriers to the ballot box for Black Americans. 🗳️
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On this anniversary of #BloodySunday we thank God for civil rights leaders like @repjohnlewis.
And we reject the racism from the @BernieSanders camp who refer to black voters as low info voters! Because we’re in the south, we have NEVER had the luxury of being low info! #Selma
And we will #NeverForget
#BernieBros are still pummeling black people for their vote! We don’t owe our vote to a cult leader with supporters who don’t respect the man who fought for our right to vote with his very blood!
#retweet
#NeverForget
#BernieBros have no respect for our civil rights heroes and will try to lecture us on civil rights! These are our heroes⬇️, not privileged white cult leaders who didn’t even work or vote until they were 40!
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"Vote Or Die"—Banner at Edmund Pettus Bridge annual crossing in Selma, Alabama, says it all. Suffering from pancreatic cancer, civil rights icon @repjohnlewis (whose skull was broken by white police during the 1965 march for voting rights) is there today. #NotGoingBack #VoteBlue
@repjohnlewis Rep. John Lewis will participate in today’s 55th commemoration of the #BloodySunday march across the Edmond Pettus Bridge. Voting rights activists, including Lewis, were beaten by police when they crossed the bridge to march to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965. ajc.com/news/state--re…
@repjohnlewis 🔥"Vote like you've never ever voted before! Vote to redeem the soul of America"—civil rights icon @RepJohnLewis, suffering from stage 4 cancer, doing more than his share to inspire Pettus Bridge marchers on #BloodySunday anniversary, to use our tremendous voting power or lose it
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Sunday service has begun at Brown Chapel AME Church ⛪️

On March 7, 1965, churchgoers led by @repjohnlewis marched from the pews of Brown Chapel to the Edmund Pettus Bridge—and unknowingly into the terror of what became known as #BloodySunday.

#Selma55 #LDFatSelma Image
LDF Deputy Director of Litigation Leah Aden recognizes the contributions that Judge John Nixon made to the civil rights movement.

#LDFatSelma #Selma55 Image
“We are lifting up Judge Nixon because...the judge’s life represents exactly what we need in this moment—non-Black allies who appreciate the contributions of Black people to the realization of this country’s principles...who make choices that risk their own power & authority.” ImageImage
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