Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #histmed

Most recents (14)

It's time for a #histmed #medthread about the discovery of microbes!

To say that mankind has a complicated relationship with the microscopic world would be an understatement, since a major selling point of many products is that they kill 99% of it.
For what it’s worth, there’s an awesome meme about the bacterial one percenters who somehow make it through the Lysol and Listerine apocalypse (this one is from itsthetie.com)
By the way, this #medthread is meant as a companion for Micrographia, the latest episode of @BedsideRounds (bedside-rounds.org/episode-48-mic…), since you can’t really see pictures through the radio.
Read 23 tweets
1/ Why are EKG waves named starting with the letter P? What happened to letters A through O?

I’m guessing you’ve probably never wondered this, but if you’re curious, here’s a brief historical #medthread / #tweetorial on how the EKG waves got the names they did.
2/ The first electrical tracings of the heart were obtained in 1887 by A.D. Waller, a British physiologist and physician, who used a Lippmann capillary electrometer to capture the tracings.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P…
3/ As a physiologist, Waller labelled the two waves on his initial tracing V1 & V2 based on their site of anatomic origin- the ventricle. He would continue, often rather adamantly, to refer to the electrical waves as A, V1, & V2 throughout his career.

sciencedirect.com/science/articl…
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(1/14) THREAD ON BLOODLETTING 👇 for #WorldBloodDonorDay. When King Charles II suffered a sudden seizure on the morning of 2 February 1685, his personal physician had just the remedy. He quickly slashed open a vein in the King’s left arm and filled a basin with the royal blood.
(2/14) Over the next few days, the King's physicians gave enemas and urged him to drink various potions, including boiled spirits from a human skull. Charles was bled a second time before he lapsed into a coma and died.
(3/14) Even without his doctors’ ministrations, the King may have succumbed, yet his final days were certainly not made any easier by the relentless bloodletting and purging. By the time of Charles II’s death, however, bloodletting was standard medical practice.
Read 14 tweets
The end of another semester of engaging students with @WikiEducation at @MissouriSandT @sandtcasb in #HistSCI means another tweet thread about this super fun project.
49 students, 32 articles, 40K words added, +285K views so far. I love their work! Take a look!
I'm going to group them. First group-- #WomenInSTEM #WomeninHistory
Students found that, uh oh, it's HARD to find reliable sources on women in science! This didn't stop them, though. They pushed through and learned some new research skills.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annie_S._… is 1 product.
Tycho's sister, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophia_Br… was another article that needed work. The women who worked on this one had to find all sources on Tycho then sift through for the 2-3 pages about Sophia. Thank goodness for good #librarians at S&T who were patient and helpful!
Read 29 tweets
It’s time for another #histmed Tweetorial -- this time I'm going to talk about the pesky definition of a fever, and where the 98.6 F average body temp came from!

Full disclosure: will use C AND F for temp, but no K or R.
FYI this is a complementary Tweetorial to @tony_breu's amazing one on why we have night sweats
Let’s start with a case!

A 29 year-old woman presents with a week of cough, myalgias, and chills. Her temperature is 99.9 F (37.7C). She tells you, “This is a fever for me because I run low.”
Read 31 tweets
(1/18) A Brief History of Coronary Angioplasty and the Roots of the Interventional Cardiology Field -- a #Tweetorial

#Cardiotwitter #FOAMed #ACCFIT #histmed @ACCCardioEd

Courtesy of @PopmaJeffrey & @ACCinTouch
(2/18) Dr. Werner Forssman (🇩🇪) performs 1st human #RHC (1929) by inserting a 65cm urologic catheter into his own antecubital vein and walking up to the X-ray department for imaging. Reportedly, he did this repeatedly! He left urology for primary care & shared @NobelPrize (1956).
(3/18) Dr. Fariñas (🇨🇺) performs aortography via femoral🔪 cut down (1941). Dr. Euler (🇩🇪) performs thoracic angiography by direct aorta puncture via esophagus (1949). Drs. Cournand & Dickinson (🇺🇸) open 1st US #cath lab (1945), publish extensively, and shared @NobelPrize (1956).
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(1/7) THREAD 👇Photo of an unidentified victim of the TITANIC being embalmed on the deck of the Mackay Bennett, which was one of four ships chartered by the White Star Line to collect bodies shortly after the disaster. The ship and its crew were able to recover over 300 bodies.
(2/7) When it set sail, the Mackay Bennett carried with it 100 coffins, 100 tons of ice, and 12 tons of iron bars which were used to bury badly decomposed bodies at sea. Passenger bodies in “satisfactory condition” were embalmed.
(3/7) When possible to identify: those of first class passengers were placed in coffins, while those of second and third class passengers were wrapped in canvas. Crew members were simply placed into the ice-filled hold.
Read 7 tweets
I just hit 40K! Welcome followers, old & new. Over the next few days, I’ll be tweeting 40 FAVOURITE HISTORY OBJECTS, starting with #40: a medieval skull fused with chainmail. The soldier died at the Battle of Visby in 1361 in Gotland, Sweden. He was buried in his armour.
#39 in my 40 FAVOURITE HISTORY OBJECTS: the Beauchêne skull, or exploded skull. It’s a type of anatomical preparation invented by the French anatomist Claude Beauchêne in the 19th century. This stunning example was created by Ryan Matthew Cohn.
#38 of my 40 FAVOURITE HISTORY OBJECTS: the world's oldest complete example of a human with metastatic cancer. Researchers from Durham University & the British Museum discovered evidence of tumors in this 3,000-year-old skeleton found in the Sudan in 2013: livescience.com/44269-oldest-m…
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(1/12 )THREAD 👇👇 Gather around: today’s tale is about self-sacrifice, bubonic plague, and the resilience of the human spirit. Let me tell you about EYAM: THE PLAGUE VILLAGE.
(2/12) On 1 November 1666, a young farmer named Abraham Morten took one final, agonizing breath. He was the last of 260 people to die of bubonic plague in the remote village of Eyam in Derbyshire.
(3/12) His fate had been sealed in September, 1665. George Viccars—a local tailor in Eyam—received a consignment of cloth from London, not realizing that it was playing host to fleas that were carrying the bubonic plague. Viccars was dead within a week.
Read 12 tweets
(1/6) THREAD 👇Photo of an unidentified victim of the TITANIC being embalmed on the deck of the Mackay Bennett, which was one of four ships chartered by the White Star Line to collect bodies shortly after the disaster. The ship and its crew were able to recover over 300 bodies.
(2/6) When it set sail, the Mackay Bennett carried with it 100 coffins, 100 tons of ice, and 12 tons of iron bars which were used to bury badly decomposed bodies at sea. Passenger bodies in “satisfactory condition” were embalmed.
(3/6 ) When possible to identify: those of first class passengers were placed in coffins, while those of second and third class passengers were wrapped in canvas. Crew members were simply placed into the ice-filled hold.
Read 7 tweets
Time for a Tweetorial! Though this will only be partially #histmed and mostly about philosophy. Inspired by @chrischiu -- so let’s talk about Occam’s Razor and Hickam’s Dictum!
But before we get going, let’s start with a little pre-test. Case #1. A young man presents with acute onset of severe fevers and chills, rhinorrhea, headache, confusion, and neck stiffness. What does he have?
And case #2, a middle aged woman presents to clinic with a nocturnal cough which she has had for a number of years. What is the most likely diagnosis?
Read 27 tweets
1/ No history of vaccination should begin with Jenner. The practice of inoculation is a necessary precursor to any history of vaccination, but often gets left behind, diminished or derided. Not to mention Benjamin Jesty. #historyisnotGreatMen #histmed #histSTM (thread)
2/ Smallpox has been with us possibly since the Neolithic Revolution. And at least since the 16th century, variolation (or insufflation (blowing dried smallpox matter into the nose) was routinely practiced as a preventive in China. And that is based on written records alone.
3/ In India from the 17th century onwards, there is written evidence of variolation, or dipping a sharp iron needle into dried smallpox matter and puncturing the skin in a small circle, usually on the upper arm. Practiced during the spring, variolation used 'pocky matter'....
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Hey #medtwitter, it’s time for another #histmed #FOAMed Tweetorial! I’m giving a couple of lectures this fall, and in the spirit of #FOAM I’m going to (try my best) to do a Tweetorial for each, so anyone can benefit/watch me flounder/vehemently disagree with me.
So thank you to @BostonChiefs, and let's talk about semiotics and the development of the physical exam!
First, an opinion poll. Do you think that the physical exam as it is practiced today is useful for care of our patients? When I poll people, I’ve noticed dramatic response differential between training levels.
Read 47 tweets
We’re taking a closer look at conflict and compromise in American history.
@NationalHistory Day students explored that topic in exhibits, and are sharing their exhibits on the floor. A young woman shows of her National History Day exhibit about the Berlin Wall.
Take a closer look at objects from our collection that show conflict and compromise in American history with our curators. Mallory Warner shows off artifacts from the Medical Science collection with other staff in the background.
Some of our curators looked at aspects of famous conflicts, like the Civil War. Curator Joan Boudreau explored the history of printing during the American Civil War. Learn more here: s.si.edu/2JMiV0a An image from Smithsonian Libraries showing a Printing office during the Civil War
Read 23 tweets

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