Discover and read the best of Twitter Threads about #arthistory

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Today is #NationalDogDay! Lets examine what roles our 4-legged friends have played in #DisHist!
Artistic representations of dogs accompanying #blind singers, beggars etc from across the world suggests that they have often worked and lived alongside #disabled handlers..1/ The blind man wears patched clothing and seems to be a beggar: he is led by a skinny dog with its ribs showing. The blind man appears to be holding a stick to guide him as well.A medieval color illustration from the Book of Hours shows a blind man receives sight from Christ while his dog looks on.
In this #earlymodern illustration of the Dance of Death, Death cuts the rope that links the blind man and his dog: “I cut you off from your guide.”
The blind man responds, saying, “I cannot take a step without my dog (hund).”
#DisHist #NationalDogDay..2/ The engraved illustration shows Death on the left as a skeleton, confronting a man with a hat and cloak, who appears to be a blind and is led by a dog. Death is using scissors to cut the rope used to lead the dog.
For more on #DisHist and good doggos in medieval illustrations, read @drkmurch's blog here:

kristamurchison.com/medieval-guide…

...3/
Read 9 tweets
July 16, 2019 marks a milestone in the history for scholarly practice and publishing for #museums because of @GettyMuseum @gettypubs . #digitalarthistory #digpublishing #thread
@GettyMuseum @GettyPubs The Corpus of Ancient Vases (CVA) is significant especially as it among the first by an internationally leading art museum to utilize the #CreativeCommons 4.0 International Attribution License for a publication creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.…. #openglam Screenshot of CC-BY License at Getty CVA Publication
The contents of this digital publication, subject to the license and terms of conditions, may be used with attribution to @GettyMuseum, including for commercial purposes. This extends to third-party applications like @internetarchive @Wikimedia @creativecommons. #openglam
Read 13 tweets
When cheap postage stamps came out in the 1800s suddenly people could send Christmas Cards.
Since the medium was new, the visual language didn't really exist yet.
Their symbolism is all over the map and it's fantastic.

#MerryChristmas #History #VisualArt
Notice the 'themes' of the cards are recognizable: root veggies, roast, snow, gathering together, feasting, tiny people like elves, birth and rebirth... Even though the combinations and individual items are almost nonsensical.
#anthropology
Sadly, the now familiar tropes of late-Victorian "Christmas" (the tree, candles, tufts of snow, Santa...) asserted themselves relatively quickly due to mass printers cornering the market. Images like dead robins, a pagan symbol of luck, all but vanished by early 1900.
Read 4 tweets

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